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English Monk in Thailand....


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Hello Para

 

Thank you for making this interesting thread, i for one am going to follow it...

 

I have never been a monk, (did entertain the idea for a while some years ago) but i have been/do meditate in longer periods every day, and generally try to live my life after the motto "treat other people the way you would like them to treat you" which means i am generally always friendly and polite.

 

I am non religious, because i do not believe that religion really works.

From my knowledge all religions have participated in war, and i do not condone war of any kind.

 

I dont really have any questions, so i will leave that up to others.

Thanks again

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Furry just asked this question:

 

"Second a quick question about Karma. You have said it only comes back around to you in your next life. Are you saying it won't come back to you during this life, or that it cannot? It seems to me that what you put out into the universe is going to come back around, in this life or the next, but sometimes it comes back sooner than later"

 

If I may I would like to quote the following:

 

"Kamma classified according to time at which results are produced:

a) One that ripens in the same lifetime.

b) One that ripens in the next lifetime.

c) One that ripens in successive births."

 

 "These three are bound to produce results, as a seed to sprout.  Just as a seed needs conditions and help to sprout, so do these kinds of Kamma."................. 

 

Understanding one's Destiny by K.M.M Swe Published by May-Su-Thin-Nu & Brothers Maw. 2006.

 

That is just the start of one of the chapters on Kamma.   So as Para said it can come back to you in this life. 

 

 

What I said in post #44 replying to you was

 

Depends on how much good/bad karma you have built up! Sure it can come back in this life if its deserved.

 

As they say what goes around comes around.....

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Hello Para

 

Thank you for making this interesting thread, i for one am going to follow it...

 

I have never been a monk, (did entertain the idea for a while some years ago) but i have been/do meditate in longer periods every day, and generally try to live my life after the motto "treat other people the way you would like them to treat you" which means i am generally always friendly and polite.

 

I am non religious, because i do not believe that religion really works.

From my knowledge all religions have participated in war, and i do not condone war of any kind.

 

I dont really have any questions, so i will leave that up to others.

Thanks again

 

You don't have to ordain to be a Buddhist and by the sounds of it you already lead a Buddhist life which is all that matters.

 

As for meditation I struggle as I pretty much destroyed my body through steroid abuse as associated damage many years ago. Alkl this BS about having to sit in the full lotus i scrap I sit on a chair nice and comfortable.

 

I had the honor of being taught meditation by a excellent Monk and he said to meditate for 45 minutes at a time. The first 15 minutes should be walking meditation as that quietens the head down the best. Follow that by 30 minutes of sitting the first 15 your head will still be busy but after then the final 15 should be productive.

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You don't have to ordain to be a Buddhist and by the sounds of it you already lead a Buddhist life which is all that matters.

 

As for meditation I struggle as I pretty much destroyed my body through steroid abuse as associated damage many years ago. Alkl this BS about having to sit in the full lotus i scrap I sit on a chair nice and comfortable.

 

I had the honor of being taught meditation by a excellent Monk and he said to meditate for 45 minutes at a time. The first 15 minutes should be walking meditation as that quietens the head down the best. Follow that by 30 minutes of sitting the first 15 your head will still be busy but after then the final 15 should be productive.

Lol... that lotus position is not for me either, had some knee injuries in my time, and often i cant bend my knees (mostly the right one) to that level without it hurting a lot.

 

I find that sitting with a straight back, and both feet solidly planted on the ground works well...

Will consider trying meditating like that... i mean while walking first, that i have never tried.

Just noticing my own breathing, and gently refocusing on that whenever i notice the mind wandering have been good/best for me.

 

At times i have had some very lucid dreams (call them trances if you like) while meditating, i bet you have too.

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Lol... that lotus position is not for me either, had some knee injuries in my time, and often i cant bend my knees (mostly the right one) to that level without it hurting a lot.

 

I find that sitting with a straight back, and both feet solidly planted on the ground works well...

Will consider trying meditating like that... i mean while walking first, that i have never tried.

Just noticing my own breathing, and gently refocusing on that whenever i notice the mind wandering have been good/best for me.

 

At times i have had some very lucid dreams (call them trances if you like) while meditating, i bet you have too.

 

I never tried it either till I was shown. Its so much better as you concentrate on the actually walking which stops your mind wandering. Sure focusing on your breath of the rising and falling of the abdomen is fine but walking is so much better.

 

Ajan Chah said once if you have not worn out your meditation walking path to be knee deep you are still a beginner!

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A friend wrote to me in a PM, i am sure he dont mind me showing you, but will keep him anonymous, he can tell you himself who he is.

What he wrote is in italic, and the rest is my thoughts on the subject.

 

I guess that actually brings a question to mind: What does buddhism say about worrying?

 

"Mate, at the end of the day I have found that there is no real need to worry too much.

Something will come up and the path to take will appear when it appears."

 

That indeed is very true, too bad not more people understand this.

Worrying doesnt get you anything but worries and perhaps early wrinkles... :-)

I have found that things generally work them selfs out when left alone, or in other words of i dont worry about it, it tends to go away...

 

Whenever i have a situation or problem come up, i look at it, do what i feel i can do, and let it do whatever it wants, no sense in worrying how it goes.

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Worrying like doubt are pointless.

 

Learning to simply live in the day as right now is the only real thing there is. Yesterday is past and tomorrow yet to come only today is real. This really helped me as I have a couple of really big problems around me right now and I found if I just focused on living now then life was a lot easier.

 

As with most bits of sound advice they are easily said but sometime hard to follow.

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I never tried it either till I was shown. Its so much better as you concentrate on the actually walking which stops your mind wandering. Sure focusing on your breath of the rising and falling of the abdomen is fine but walking is so much better.

 

Ajan Chah said once if you have not worn out your meditation walking path to be knee deep you are still a beginner!

 

So just a question on the walking technique.

 

Are you saying that you should walk a set path or have a walking path you always use, instead of walking a different path every time??

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So just a question on the walking technique.

 

Are you saying that you should walk a set path or have a walking path you always use, instead of walking a different path every time??

 

I normally walk 10 paces forward turn and walk back depends on the size of the space I have. I know in my kuti I could just manage 8 very small steps each way.

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Many get together s and bar crawls are organised by members here on the board.

 

I don't know if any others would be interested but i would probably join in if there was a meeting where someone like you could try to explain a bit more about the Buddhist way. Not looking for a meeting to turn anyone over to Buddhisme, but more to get some more understanding.

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Many get together s and bar crawls are organised by members here on the board.

 

I don't know if any others would be interested but i would probably join in if there was a meeting where someone like you could try to explain a bit more about the Buddhist way. Not looking for a meeting to turn anyone over to Buddhisme, but more to get some more understanding.

 

 

LMFAO you wanna lesson on Buddhism while mongering!

 

I'm game for a beer will see what happens regarding the topic of conversation.

 

Cheers for the invite.

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This is a great topic, and my hat is doffed to you, I too am drawn to Buddhism, I have been a spiritualist for many years, and from what I have learnt they are very closely connected, both are classified as ways of life rather than religions, both are concerned with the afterlife and Nivarna. I am married to a Thai lady and her devotion to Buddhism is reflected in what you say, all of the female members of the family are devout, the males do, when it suits them, usually when there is a celebration and free drinks. I have found the monks to be most friendly and as you state always wanting to learn and practice their English, sadly my Thai is too small to communicate, this I am going to rectify. 

Tipping? Not having spoken to a monk on this, but I am sure if we Desire to say thank you to someone by gifting a little money then this would be seen as good karma, unless we are knowingly feeding a habit. 

I think your outlook and expierience is worthy of being shared, of course not everybody is going to agree with you, I applaud and envy you.

Mike

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Very interesting thread, Para!

 

I was not raised to be an overly religious person, although my mother has become very active in her church as she has gotten older.  Regardless of the debate on whether it is a religion, I find the principles of Buddhism very interesting.

 

I will be back in Thailand in late October/early November, and had a few relatively basic questions:

 

I read somewhere that it is inappropriate to visit a wat in shorts, and that long pants should be worn.  Typically, I do not travel to Thailand with pants; just shorts; however, this next trip will be an exception, as I will be attending a convention and will need more "business attire" for it.  Because of my concerns re the appropriateness of my attire, I have not visited the inside of any wats, until my last trip (I was wearing shorts and frankly I do not even know if it was a wat - freinds took me there as part of some sightseeing in Udon Thani).  

 

Is it okay to go to a wat dressed more casually or do I need to wear long pants?

 

I am very curious about visiting a wat on my next visit and possibly being blessed by a monk.

 

I see many of the girls with the little string/bracelets - is that part of being blessed?  

 

How does one go about getting blessed and what does it generally entail?  Should I make a donation to the wat?  If so, could you provide me with guidelines on that?

 

I was thinking I would just have a girl take me to a local wat and guide me through it, but any info/advice you could give me would be appreciated.

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This is a great topic, and my hat is doffed to you, I too am drawn to Buddhism, I have been a spiritualist for many years, and from what I have learnt they are very closely connected, both are classified as ways of life rather than religions, both are concerned with the afterlife and Nivarna. I am married to a Thai lady and her devotion to Buddhism is reflected in what you say, all of the female members of the family are devout, the males do, when it suits them, usually when there is a celebration and free drinks. I have found the monks to be most friendly and as you state always wanting to learn and practice their English, sadly my Thai is too small to communicate, this I am going to rectify. 

Tipping? Not having spoken to a monk on this, but I am sure if we desire to say thank you to someone by gifting a little money then this would be seen as good karma, unless we are knowingly feeding a habit. 

I think your outlook and expierience is worthy of being shared, of course not everybody is going to agree with you, I applaud and envy you.

Mike

 

 

Thanks for the kind words Mike.

 

Buddhism is often confused with being a religion as outwardly it could look that way. Thing is we don't have a God to pray to only a man born over 2500 years ago that had the wisdom to help people with his words today. The Dhamma (Buddhist teachings), mindfulness and intention all form the basis of what I feel is a correct and respectful way to live your life.

 

Thai's by nature are incredibly weary of Monks girls more so girls but as you have found if you take the time to approach one they will gladly talk to you just remember its not the done thing for a Monk to start a conversation which is why you will generally see them walking with their eyes cast down.

 

The Vinnaya (Monks rules) states a Monk can not directly receive money (this will rattle a few cages!) which is why you will see Monks being given envelopes with money inside. I have had all types give Alms to me some extravagant Bangkok Thai's and then the old girl who would give rice every day. For me I loved the old girl as she would wait with a smile on her face every morning to make an offering whereas sometimes I felt the Bangkok lot were doing it for show almost like they were trying to buy good karma. That is SOME Bangkok people not all.

 

As for tipping. As long as what you are offering is from the heart and not in the hope of getting something back a Monk will be happy to receive anything. I once had a Thai buy my washing powder and softener in 7-11 !

 

I really don't care if people find me, my experiences or this thread an issue my ego is not that delicate and if I can help just 1 person then IMO its all worth it.

 

Please don't envy me I have made some seriously bad choices in my life being a Monk was one of the rare good ones!

 

With metta.

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Very interesting thread, Para!

 

I was not raised to be an overly religious person, although my mother has become very active in her church as she has gotten older.  Regardless of the debate on whether it is a religion, I find the principles of Buddhism very interesting.

 

I will be back in Thailand in late October/early November, and had a few relatively basic questions:

 

I read somewhere that it is inappropriate to visit a wat in shorts, and that long pants should be worn.  Typically, I do not travel to Thailand with pants; just shorts; however, this next trip will be an exception, as I will be attending a convention and will need more "business attire" for it.  Because of my concerns re the appropriateness of my attire, I have not visited the inside of any wats, until my last trip (I was wearing shorts and frankly I do not even know if it was a wat - freinds took me there as part of some sightseeing in Udon Thani).  

 

Is it okay to go to a wat dressed more casually or do I need to wear long pants?

 

I am very curious about visiting a wat on my next visit and possibly being blessed by a monk.

 

I see many of the girls with the little string/bracelets - is that part of being blessed?  

 

How does one go about getting blessed and what does it generally entail?  Should I make a donation to the wat?  If so, could you provide me with guidelines on that?

 

I was thinking I would just have a girl take me to a local wat and guide me through it, but any info/advice you could give me would be appreciated.

 

Neither of my parents were slightly religious I kinda stumbled across Buddhism after living here a few years.

 

Wearing shorts is fine mate its like 90 here most of the time! I would suggest no vests especially ones that say 'Same Same' or 'Chang' on them ;-)

 

I am very curious about visiting a wat on my next visit and possibly being blessed by a monk.

 

I would suggest giving Alms in the morning and getting a blessing that way its always been my favorite. To have a blessing at a temple is possible but you are dependent on what the Monks are doing when you want the blessing.

 

I see many of the girls with the little string/bracelets - is that part of being blessed?

 

Yep its like a reminder that you have made an offering.

 

How does one go about getting blessed and what does it generally entail?  Should I make a donation to the wat?  If so, could you provide me with guidelines on that?

 

Remember a Monk is totally dependent on the community to survive hence the Monks blessing them when they do. You can make a donation to the Wat but I would recommend giving something to the Monks blessing you. Again I would really recommend giving Alms in the morning for your blessing then feel free to visit a temple later.

 

All temples welcome lay people in to join them for breakfast (8am) and lunch (11:30) where you can eat with the Monks. Might be a bit intimidating but you will be welcomed.

 

If you cant find a girl to take you give me a shout and I will.

 

Hope that helps.

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Interesting Para, thanks.

Suffering is born out of joy and one's joy is someone else's suffering.

Same as you lose only what you have had, it is part of life - gaining or losing.

If you believe in fate, karma etc easier to live with loss.

God bless.

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We are all entitled to our opinions only the insecure feel the need to impart theirs on others.

 

If this thread make you so angry I am sure there are many more that wont.....

 

""We are all entitled to our opinions only the insecure feel the need to impart theirs on others.""

 

could not agree more... going to have to remember this line... thanks!

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I normally walk 10 paces forward turn and walk back depends on the size of the space I have. I know in my kuti I could just manage 8 very small steps each way.

 

What is a kuti ? 

 

Googled it and it has several meanings,  in your case is it a small cabin type room ?  sleeping quarters ? 

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Thanks for sharing Para!

 

So, do you still consider yourself a Monk?  What are you up to in Pattaya these days?

 

Would love to meet you next time I am in the same town, will PM you.

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Fascinating thread and thanks for sharing your wisdom.

 

For the most part, I agree with the 4 truths and the 8-fold path. Most makes sense to me and seems like it would be beneficial to my life as well as those around me if I were to try to live this path.

 

However, there are a couple of things with Buddhism that just don't make sense for me. Mainly, how is it known that we live many lives and that our present situation is partially determined by our previous life(s?) I guess I just can't believe that karma from this life will affect our next life or that karma from my previous lives has played a part in my current position. Is there a way to prove this or at least a case to be made? From a philosophical point of view I really like Buddhism and think it adds a lot of wonderful thought to our world.

 

Again, thanks for the topic!

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Interesting Para, thanks.

Suffering is born out of joy and one's joy is someone else's suffering.

Same as you lose only what you have had, it is part of life - gaining or losing.

If you believe in fate, karma etc easier to live with loss.

God bless.

 

I kinda see it differently. Joy is an emotion and a pleasant one at that. IMO suffering comes from attachment to the feeling joy gives so when there is no joy the craving starts along with suffering. I know it sounds like I am splitting hairs stay with me. It also applies to all emotions both good and bad. Take love for example its feel great when you are in it and hurts like hell when you are not, yes? Anger, resentment, jealousy all emotions which is attached to cause suffering.

 

Learning not to attach to any emotion and simply accept it means when it isn't there there is no craving so no suffering. This way the attachment becomes the problem not the emotion so regardless of the current emotional state you are in as long as you realize it will come and go at will then you learn to simply accept without attachment.

 

Out of all the Buddhist stuff I learned this was the hardest for me to grasp but has proven to be easily the most important thing.

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""We are all entitled to our opinions only the insecure feel the need to impart theirs on others.""

 

could not agree more... going to have to remember this line... thanks!

 

In Buddhism there is no 'I', 'me' or 'mine' as the goal is to extinguish the ego. Pretty hard to do when someone is rattling your cage but it makes for a far simpler life.

 

Glad you liked it. 

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What is a kuti ? 

 

Googled it and it has several meanings,  in your case is it a small cabin type room ?  sleeping quarters ? 

 

Sorry should of made it clear. A kuti is a Monks hut. Here is a picture of my old kuti.

 

 

30092011079.jpg

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