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English Monk in Thailand....


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There is a forrest monastery in Ubon Ratchathani where foreigners can attend/stay for a few days . The monastery is dedicated to Ajahn Chah, a famous Thai monk and wiseman. You can not contact them by mail or phone, but you have to write them a letter and tell them why you want to stay in .

 

http://www.watpahnanachat.org/

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this is the most useless question ive seen yet.

 

tweedle-dee without expanding this post could be considered useless as well.

 

Elaborate on your opinion and lets discuss it......

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No, they are not meant to be taken literally. I'd have thought that was fairly standard.

 

 

The joy of Buddhism is it’s a path of learning through experience and practice rather than from reading and reciting.

Pepe has given an answer very close to what I would.

 

I'm no expert but let me attempt to 'enlighten' you! And before you take that literally it was ironic :)

 

 

 

LOL! Thank you our Enlightened skunk….. ;-)

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Na, many are worse. I will say I have heard that it is not a aproved, nor disaproved vocation.

 

On the 1 hand if she is doing it to support her kids-parents-grandparents sorta a OK thing.

If however it is for drugs and booze, not a good thing.

 

Just what i have heard.........

 

I heard the same thing :-)

 

Its all about intention rather than action.

 

A girl working to help her family is doing a bad job but with the correct intention so attains positive karma from it. However a girl working to party and do drugs while ignoring her family’s needs is doing a bad job with the wrong intention not good IMHO.

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So I am back in London working back for the same investment back in the same building as I was when I left the UK 12 years ago. I work with guys I knew back then who knew the old me and have to admit I feel very strange. I am now the preverbal square peg in a round hole.

 

I have done so much and changed beyond measure but time here seems to of stopped with people doing exactly what they were all them years ago. Whilst the road I have walked has been incredibly hard it’s also rewarded me beyond belief.

 

Acceptance with non attachment has been the foundation of being able to relocate back into 'normal' life. The only difference is I am now playing the game appearing to comply with the BS demands society puts on you allowing me to be free and enjoy seeing what was in such a clearer light......

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So I am back in London working back for the same investment back in the same building as I was when I left the UK 12 years ago. I work with guys I knew back then who knew the old me and have to admit I feel very strange. I am now the preverbal square peg in a round hole.

 

I have done so much and changed beyond measure but time here seems to of stopped with people doing exactly what they were all them years ago. Whilst the road I have walked has been incredibly hard it’s also rewarded me beyond belief.

 

Acceptance with non attachment has been the foundation of being able to relocate back into 'normal' life. The only difference is I am now playing the game appearing to comply with the BS demands society puts on you allowing me to be free and enjoy seeing what was in such a clearer light......

 

I feel like I understand how you feel but not to the extent of your alienation after 12 years, of course.

 

About seven years ago, I took a year and a half off work to travel – not exactly on a spiritual quest, but it was a bit of a ‘find yourself’ sabbatical. I gave up my flat, sold almost everything and took off with a backpack and a five continent, 20 stop RTW ticket (which of course ran out after 12 months, so I busked it from there). Had a lot of great experiences, getting to know many cultures and meeting great people. For most practical purposes, I was ‘off the grid’ aside from the odd ‘cheerio, I’m alive’ sent to family from internet cafes (no phone, no laptop, no facebook etc). I read a book a week too!

 

You learn a lot about yourself, travelling alone – self-sufficiency and independence, a surprising amount of confidence and capability.

 

I remember when I got home, the first things that struck me was how clean and orderly all the streets were, and how few people were on them (compared to the developing countries I’d spent most of my time in). It was disorienting. The next thing that struck me was the TV news – it made me irritable to watch it, I couldn’t watch it at all actually. It was so full of ‘first world problems’ and trivia and it was all so parochial. After that, my family, friends and colleagues, who it seemed to me had all marked time while I was away, and again, were full of worries about money and the stuff they owned, getting more stuff, gossip and office politics, and just bullshit in general. People seemed quite stressed, even angry, about the most trivial things too.

 

The adjustment takes along time. For many months I lived in a granny flat (like a bedsit) and wore the same clothes from my backpack I’d worn for 18 months before – I just had no need of the stuff from my previous life, or new gizmos. I was quite content and self-contained. I don’t think the Desire to break free will ever leave me – I’ve got away two or three times a year every year since I returned, just to stay sane – not just mongering – I’ve been to Malaysia, Indonesia a few times, Myanmar, East Timor and the Philippines too. I found a good way to cope was to be always planning my next little escape.

 

Maybe a coping mechanism is to plan your next escape!

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@dancaholic nice pictures cheers for sharing.

 

How's the rain is your phone still playing up? ;-)

back in the aussie desert so now its the sun mate its melting the components the rain did not get.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I feel like I understand how you feel but not to the extent of your alienation after 12 years, of course.

 

About seven years ago, I took a year and a half off work to travel – not exactly on a spiritual quest, but it was a bit of a ‘find yourself’ sabbatical. I gave up my flat, sold almost everything and took off with a backpack and a five continent, 20 stop RTW ticket (which of course ran out after 12 months, so I busked it from there). Had a lot of great experiences, getting to know many cultures and meeting great people. For most practical purposes, I was ‘off the grid’ aside from the odd ‘cheerio, I’m alive’ sent to family from internet cafes (no phone, no laptop, no facebook etc). I read a book a week too!

 

You learn a lot about yourself, travelling alone – self-sufficiency and independence, a surprising amount of confidence and capability.

 

I remember when I got home, the first things that struck me was how clean and orderly all the streets were, and how few people were on them (compared to the developing countries I’d spent most of my time in). It was disorienting. The next thing that struck me was the TV news – it made me irritable to watch it, I couldn’t watch it at all actually. It was so full of ‘first world problems’ and trivia and it was all so parochial. After that, my family, friends and colleagues, who it seemed to me had all marked time while I was away, and again, were full of worries about money and the stuff they owned, getting more stuff, gossip and office politics, and just bullshit in general. People seemed quite stressed, even angry, about the most trivial things too.

 

The adjustment takes along time. For many months I lived in a granny flat (like a bedsit) and wore the same clothes from my backpack I’d worn for 18 months before – I just had no need of the stuff from my previous life, or new gizmos. I was quite content and self-contained. I don’t think the desire to break free will ever leave me – I’ve got away two or three times a year every year since I returned, just to stay sane – not just mongering – I’ve been to Malaysia, Indonesia a few times, Myanmar, East Timor and the Philippines too. I found a good way to cope was to be always planning my next little escape.

 

Maybe a coping mechanism is to plan your next escape!

 

Sinbad I am so with you. I travelled for years before hitting Thailand and finding a path I enjopyed. Before I left I had a lot of trpphy pocessions now I have none difference is like you found having none of the BS actually makes you realise how little you really need right?

 

I find myself significantly happier now than I can ever remember some has to be from Buddhism but some is also from the life I have been able to live.

 

Older and wiser or just been there seen that!

 

Have a great weekend guys.

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  • 2 months later...

Para,

 

This is the most amazing thread I have followed since I have been in Thailand which is five years. It has taken a few days to go through to absorb the wisdom and 'way of life teachings.' I can relate to a lot of the Buddhist 'ways of life' and practicing some unknowingly. I am in a lucky situation where I have my health and my occupation gives me a lot of time off to travel but now settled in Thailand.

 

I haven't stepped foot in the UK for 5 years now and have little intention of doing so. So I know how you feel being away from LOS. Glad to hear that your legal thing is over and it went your way. It will be good to have you back in LOS and would love to meet you as I have 101 questions regarding Buddhism. Hope you find blighty ok for now and return to LOS

 

Best endeavor's in all that you pursue.

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Para,

 

This is the most amazing thread I have followed since I have been in Thailand which is five years. It has taken a few days to go through to absorb the wisdom and 'way of life teachings.' I can relate to a lot of the Buddhist 'ways of life' and practicing some unknowingly. I am in a lucky situation where I have my health and my occupation gives me a lot of time off to travel but now settled in Thailand.

 

I haven't stepped foot in the UK for 5 years now and have little intention of doing so. So I know how you feel being away from LOS. Glad to hear that your legal thing is over and it went your way. It will be good to have you back in LOS and would love to meet you as I have 101 questions regarding Buddhism. Hope you find blighty ok for now and return to LOS

 

Best endeavor's in all that you pursue.

 

Hey Phil

 

Thanks for the kind words I think I/we have been lucky that the trolls quicky got bored leaving it to a few who really helped shape and guide this thread.

 

I am hoping it wont be so long till I am back kinda getting it in the neck from Mrs Para! Things here have changed so much and trying to rebuild a life here is hard but slowly getting there.

 

Wanna share anything with us or ask any questions?

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Hi Para,

 

That was a quick reply. Got no questions as of yet as I am slowly going through the info already supplied so I can ask pertinent questions. You sound quite intelligent so I don't want to ask dumb questions. One thing I would like to know is there any Wot where a farang can go and stay. Not as a monk but as a visitor to educate himself or, perhaps, through intrigue about Buddhism in general. Obviously regarding the discipline in the Wot.

 

That Troll earlier on in the post sound's a pain in the a...e or where the sun don't shine. He sounded typical of the sort of person who does not know when to be quiet and listen. I had a 'sort of' Christian upbringing! Even in the Bible it says "even a fool is considered wise when he is silent". That came to mind. Similarly, I was bought up in a rough area of Liverpool and made my own way. You had too.

 

When do you think you will return to LOS. I work offshore on a 6on6off weeks ratio. It would be good to team up and have a chin wag. Often so many questions can get answered in a short space of time.

 

Here is a question that maybe yes or no related to Buddhism. I have been in Jomtien for approx. 5 years now and have never seen a monk ride a scooter. Seen them as a passenger. Is this to do with material possesions and the 'letting go' of 'ego', etc. The reason being I have a Yamaha Mio 115cc on the go. Only 500 kM on it. If I could spend some time learning the Buddhist ways I would donate to that Wot in way of a donation for board, etc. Would this be OK with the Abbot or not. That's if they could use it.

 

Keep warm in the UK the cold spell is due soon. We used to fiddle our meters to keep warm. The birds used to sit on our roof to get warm.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hey Phil

 

Man not a good show hey a quick reply to your first post then how many weeks to get back to you!

 

One thing I would like to know is there any Wot where a farang can go and stay. Not as a monk but as a visitor to educate himself or, perhaps, through intrigue about Buddhism in general. Obviously regarding the discipline in the Wot.

 

In theory ANY Wat will welcome you the problem is the language barrier. I am assuming you have a Thai partner/friends so going with them will make life significantly easier. My old Temple was in Bang Khai, Rayong about 45 minutes from Pattaya where both the Abbot and senior Monk spoke almost perfect English which would add significant value to a visit. Also my Abbot used to teach Dhamma and meditation in English.

 

Have a look at http://www.littlebang.org/ its run by an English Monk who has been ordained in Thailand for over 17 years. His Dhamma knowledge is superb and obviously no language barriers.

 

‘That Troll earlier on in the post sound's a pain in the a...e or where the sun don't shine.’

 

Unfortunately he was only interested in trying to prove himself right and any answers to his questions were ignored as they often went against his crusade. Thing is I believe we all need to be questioned about or decisions to ensure we are on the right path. I have no problem with non-Buddhists posting questions and joing in as long as they are constructive. I am sure they are many who have dropped by that are not Buddhist!

‘When do you think you will return to LOS. I work offshore on a 6on6off weeks ratio. It would be good to team up and have a chin wag. Often so many questions can get answered in a short space of time.’

 

Kinda tough question and one I get daily from the wife! Coming back to the UK with only a sports bag of belongings and having to integrate back into ‘normal’ life is hard at times but its slowly getting there. As soon as I know a date I will let you know.

 

‘Here is a question that maybe yes or no related to Buddhism. I have been in Jomtien for approx. 5 years now and have never seen a monk ride a scooter. Seen them as a passenger. Is this to do with material possessions and the 'letting go' of 'ego', etc.’

 

Yep, pretty close. Monks are not allowed processions its to allow them to better understand suffering and non attachment.

 

‘The reason being I have a Yamaha Mio 115cc on the go. Only 500 kM on it. If I could spend some time learning the Buddhist ways I would donate to that Wot in way of a donation for board, etc. Would this be OK with the Abbot or not. That's if they could use it.’

 

Kinda tough question. No Abbot/Temple would ever expect anything let alone something as big as a motorbike donation. Most temples have laypeople that help out and offer transport when needed. A donation to the Temple often helps with the running costs but is again never expected. I would suggest finding a Temple you feel comfortable in and spending a bit of time there. You can always sponsor a lunch we used to LOVE when someone brought KFC in for us!

 

I hope this has helped and again sorry for taking so long to reply.

 

Para

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Para,

 

Good to hear from you. Have just been in Jomtien for the last 4 weeks. Had to do a two week traing course which luckily I passed the exams. On my way to Saudi Arabia which is like going back 1,000 years in time. Got some books about Bhuddism but I expect they maybe confiscated by the Saudi customs. We have the internet onboard so I will be on Pattaya Addicts quite alot.

 

Take care of yourself and look forward to this thread. I have learnt so much about Bhuddism in general.

 

Phil

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