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PattayaFirstTime

Power Converter help.

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PattayaFirstTime

I bought a power converter with me, it's not a big expensive one its a bestek converter, I use it for my cpap, phone charging and laptop.   Before this trip I upgraded my laptop to a gaming laptop as I remember being bored some days and figured i'd play games with friends. Well it works fine for 90% of what I do but on games that make my laptop run at max I guess the power draw is too strong for this converter and it shuts itself off as a precaution from getting too hot, and then my laptop only runs for about an hour before it's fully drained..

I'm wondering if anyone knows any good places out here in pattaya to buy a converter that can convert the US 110v to whatever Thailand uses and is able to handle higher power or uh... for heavier use I guess? I would like to be able to game well without having to unplug my laptop, game 50 minutes then stop and have to plug in to charge it.  I'm in pattaya for another 3 months minimum due to the current issues so I am hoping to get a stronger converter. I know i'll need it regardless for the future as well if I go anywhere else.

I was thinking of checking tukcom if they have all the places open yet, or maybe power buy in central but i'm unsure of how I would even describe what I need to them, it has to convert the voltage i believe not just an adapter for the plug or my stuff could fry.

Just wondering if anyone has had any similar issues or any experience in buying a good power converter out here. Any help would be appreciated.

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rainman333
Posted (edited)

what brand is your laptop? most laptop you can plug in directly without using power converter since their adapters already handle it (ie, most mac and dell laptops with oem plugs don't need power converter)

Edited by rainman333

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Ru4Real

Would be surprised if you can't just plug it in without a converter.

Not sure if @dragonrider bought one or not but pretty sure I remember reading in his thread he was looking for one. @Garzan is also into gaming I believe so thinking he's got a decent rig. Perhaps one of those gents can point you in the right direction if you really need to buy one.

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vivid2
Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, PattayaFirstTime said:

I bought a power converter with me, it's not a big expensive one its a bestek converter, I use it for my cpap, phone charging and laptop.   Before this trip I upgraded my laptop to a gaming laptop as I remember being bored some days and figured i'd play games with friends. Well it works fine for 90% of what I do but on games that make my laptop run at max I guess the power draw is too strong for this converter and it shuts itself off as a precaution from getting too hot, and then my laptop only runs for about an hour before it's fully drained..

I'm wondering if anyone knows any good places out here in pattaya to buy a converter that can convert the US 110v to whatever Thailand uses and is able to handle higher power or uh... for heavier use I guess? I would like to be able to game well without having to unplug my laptop, game 50 minutes then stop and have to plug in to charge it.  I'm in pattaya for another 3 months minimum due to the current issues so I am hoping to get a stronger converter. I know i'll need it regardless for the future as well if I go anywhere else.

I was thinking of checking tukcom if they have all the places open yet, or maybe power buy in central but i'm unsure of how I would even describe what I need to them, it has to convert the voltage i believe not just an adapter for the plug or my stuff could fry.

Just wondering if anyone has had any similar issues or any experience in buying a good power converter out here. Any help would be appreciated.

I bought and used a power converter on my 1st trip 13 years ago, and it worked fine for everything I brought with me.  But I soon realized that virtually all of my devices were made to work on either voltage.  My laptop, iPad, iPhone, camera, electric shaver, electric toothbrush, and even my Kindle are designed to work on either voltage.  I've made 25 additional trips to LOS, and never needed the converter again.  Every electrical outlet that I've seen in hotels in Thailand will accept either the US or Asian plug.

Just look at the label near the cord or plug, and if it says "Input:  AC 100V-240V  50/60 Hz" you're good to go.  

Hope this helps.

Edited by vivid2

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PattayaFirstTime
14 minutes ago, vivid2 said:

Just look at the label near the cord or plug, and if it says "Input:  AC 100V-240V  50/60 Hz" you're good to go.  

I tried to look up the laptop specs itself, someone said the laptops might have a converter built in, didn't find anything under the laptop or in the manual, under the laptop it only says 19.5v-9.23a  dc rating.. but I looked at the power brick and that does say 100-240v 2.34va 50-60Hz. So I could use it right on the thai plugs? I just don't want to fry the pc but if that is the case like you say then thank you! You definitely helped me.

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PattayaFirstTime
34 minutes ago, rainman333 said:

what brand is your laptop? most laptop you can plug in directly without using power converter since their adapters already handle it (ie, most mac and dell laptops with oem plugs don't need power converter)

It's a predator triton 500. the one with a 2060 card. Going to try plugging it in directly like mentioned here a couple of times and giving it a shot. Was just worried i'd fry it and that would be expensive.

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dragonrider

Yes, pretty much anything you would normally travel with will run on 220v as well as 110v. I have an Asus monitor that for some reason, instead of having one of those power brick things that will do both voltages, plugs directly into the wall from the monitor. I have a 110v converter for that.

I also brought with me several pieces of American cookware - a quesadilla maker, a deep fryer, an infrared grill that only run on 110V (and that draw mucho power). After trying two huge (and expensive) 5000 watt converters, both of which have died, I bought this from Amazon US. Cost $10 to ship to Thailand:

51HYBhIAFAL._AC_SX679_.jpg.702042518af8524390cc6a769803876f.jpg

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07PQ15626/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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vivid2
I tried to look up the laptop specs itself, someone said the laptops might have a converter built in, didn't find anything under the laptop or in the manual, under the laptop it only says 19.5v-9.23a  dc rating.. but I looked at the power brick and that does say 100-240v 2.34va 50-60Hz. So I could use it right on the thai plugs? I just don't want to fry the pc but if that is the case like you say then thank you! You definitely helped me.

Bingo. The power brick is what matters, and yours is designed to work worldwide.

Virtually all manufacturers used to make different models with different voltages and different plugs for markets around the world, until some smart folks decided to re-engineer their products to work almost anyplace without converters. I think this whole trend accelerated with the laptop and smartphone market.

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NSAFun

Having worked in electronics for the last 30+ years, I can tell you that almost all electronics devices are now designed to be dual voltage (110-240V) for cost and inventory management reasons, starting around 2000 (I believe it started with mobile phones and quickly moved to laptops). Companies find it much more cost effective to have a single power supply SKU with different power cords/plugs for localization purposes. It also helped that in 2001, supply chain engineers figured out the total cost of ownership of a single power supply (albeit with multiple replaceable power cords) was much better than the alternative.

Most heat generating devices, however, are still designed for different voltages - something designed for 110V requires a different resistance to generate the same amount of heat.

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Encora

I have a 240-110 transformer, which you are welcome to, not sure of the capacity, used to run set of studio flash units. Weighs a ton.
PM me if you want it.

 

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Recce
8 hours ago, PattayaFirstTime said:

I tried to look up the laptop specs itself, someone said the laptops might have a converter built in, didn't find anything under the laptop or in the manual, under the laptop it only says 19.5v-9.23a  dc rating.. but I looked at the power brick and that does say 100-240v 2.34va 50-60Hz. So I could use it right on the thai plugs? I just don't want to fry the pc but if that is the case like you say then thank you! You definitely helped me.

You can go ahead and use it without a convert er based on the specs on the power block. You may need an adapter for the plus to fit a thai outlet.. I just don’t remember which type outlets are most common.

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Garzan
10 hours ago, PattayaFirstTime said:

I tried to look up the laptop specs itself, someone said the laptops might have a converter built in, didn't find anything under the laptop or in the manual, under the laptop it only says 19.5v-9.23a  dc rating.. but I looked at the power brick and that does say 100-240v 2.34va 50-60Hz. So I could use it right on the thai plugs? I just don't want to fry the pc but if that is the case like you say then thank you! You definitely helped me.

From what you write, you have no need at all for a power converter with your laptop. With all the electronics I've used in Thailand over the past nine years, I've only come across two things that needed a power converter; an Xbox 360 and a Phillips Sonicare toothbrush. Both of those things are 110 VAC only, and the Xbox 360 was fairly impressive at letting me know it didn't like Thai wall power. :-) 555 But even so, all that fried on the Xbox 360 (Xbox One is world rated so is fine) was the power brick. All that happened with the Phillips was the power base would not recharge the toothbrush. The solution for both was to buy 220 VAC rated bases/bricks. 

What you need to look at with your electronics is the label on the power supply for whatever it is. The label will have rated input voltage ranges. On your laptop, it's 100-240 VAC 50-60 cycles. I think you'll find that is fairly common. I was really surprised that my old Xbox didn't use a world rated power brick. So long as 220 VAC 50 cycles is included in the range of input power on your device, it will be safe to plug in to a Thai wall socket. 

However, don't be like me and assume. :-) Read the power supply information data, and you and your equipment will be fine.  

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PattayaFirstTime

Thank you to all the replies, I tested it yesterday directly to a thai outlet and it worked just fine, no issues thus far. Though a bit strange seeing the plug not go all the way into the outlet some metal still sticking out but it's working so eh. 

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forcebwithu
4 hours ago, NSAFun said:

Having worked in electronics for the last 30+ years, I can tell you that almost all electronics devices are now designed to be dual voltage (110-240V) for cost and inventory management reasons, starting around 2000 (I believe it started with mobile phones and quickly moved to laptops). Companies find it much more cost effective to have a single power supply SKU with different power cords/plugs for localization purposes. It also helped that in 2001, supply chain engineers figured out the total cost of ownership of a single power supply (albeit with multiple replaceable power cords) was much better than the alternative.

Most heat generating devices, however, are still designed for different voltages - something designed for 110V requires a different resistance to generate the same amount of heat.

I believe motors are also designed for a country's voltage and Hz?

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NSAFun
I believe motors are also designed for a country's voltage and Hz?

You are correct - my apologies for missing that - motors are as well. I am sure there are a few other devices - just did not remember any off the top of my head!

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