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I have been reading up on Buddhism. Tbh i always seen Buddhism as just another religion where you live your life by a set off RULES but thats not totally the case!

 

I find it very interesting. I feel it makes you question yourself. I am going to read up on it more and make a visit to a Buddhist monastery next year near my home.

 

Any off you UK based guys made this part off your life? 

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Thanks for being so open on your post. I have been fortunate to of been taught Vipassana and Brahma vihara philosophy and meditation and use it every day in life.     Hi Sophia, Buddhism is a way

All jokes aside,  IMO Buddhism probably gets it right as a workable philosophy for the living of one's life.   It's all the hierachical nonscence and authoratitive doctrines that I find unneccessary

I have been reading up on Buddhism. Tbh i always seen Buddhism as just another religion where you live your life by a set off RULES but thats not totally the case!   I find it very interesting. I fe

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I was seriouslly involved with a TG in the 70's when posted to Thailand and looked into Buddhism.

 

From what I read old Buddha himself was averse to Idol worship and being any sort Icon himself.

 

It was human beings who raised the Buddha to God-like status, and so the deity worship prevalent in LoS and other SE Asian countries, to a lesser extent with the trendies in the west as well.

 

IMHO Buddhism was intended to be more of a philosophy than yet another religion; simplified it's about tolerance; acceptance of one's own finite mortality; self-realisation(whatever that is), and the old Golden Rule of "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you"  (Sado-masochists understandably excluded).

 

But no, all that's too easy; let's include a hierachy, all sort of Gold icons, lots of drums and mantra chanting, prayer wheels, reincarnation, sanctification via abstinence, and magic charms and blessings !    555555

 

Human beings will always over-complicate the simplest of concepts.

 

I wonder if the TG's are aware that ol Buddha himself was an Indian ?  

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I was seriouslly involved with a TG in the 70's when posted to Thailand and looked into Buddhism.

 

From what I read old Buddha himself was averse to Idol worship and being any sort Icon himself.

 

It was human beings who raised the Buddha to God-like status, and so the deity worship prevalent in LoS and other SE Asian countries, to a lesser extent with the trendies in the west as well.

 

IMHO Buddhism was intended to be more of a philosophy than yet another religion; simplified it's about tolerance; acceptance of one's own finite mortality; self-realisation(whatever that is), and the old Golden Rule of "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you"  (Sado-masochists understandably excluded).

 

But no, all that's too easy; let's include a hierachy, all sort of Gold icons, lots of drums and mantra chanting, prayer wheels, reincarnation, sanctification via abstinence, and magic charms and blessings !    555555

 

Human beings will always over-complicate the simplest of concepts.

 

I wonder if the TG's are aware that ol Buddha himself was an Indian ?  

 

 

Interesting. You never followed it through and made it part off your life?

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I read a smallish variety of Buddhist writings in my younger days, there are a number of Buddhas. There are the 28 Buddhas described in the Buddhavamsa and not only these, according to the Avatamsaka Sutra(Flower Ornament Scripture), Gautama Buddha taught that he had previously existed in innumerable incarnations throughout past ages into pre history even, but yes the Gautama Buddha and his teachings are the ones most commonly referenced when we reference The Buddha, you'll note different statues in different places make Buddha appear fat or thin, young or old.

A lot of the teachings of The Buddha are actually heavily influenced by contemporary thoughts and philosophies of what is considered (at least by me anyway) a very philosophical time in India these include Jainism. Buddhism and Jainism are two branches of the sramana tradition that still exist today. Mahavira and Gautama Buddha were contemporaries, and according to the Pāli Canon, Gautama was aware of Mahavira's existence as well as the communities of Jain monastics.

 

A very interesting time and some great meditational literature (a profuse amount even) came about at that time, a lot of it seems to have been gathered together a couple hundred years after Gautama Buddha passed on and was possibly not exactly "original" to him but fascinating all the same.

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Interesting. You never followed it through and made it part off your life?

 

Hello mate, I never embraced Buddhism completely, but the elements that appealed to me yes;  tolerance; acceptance of one's own finite mortality; and the old Golden Rule.  

 

Understandably I fail miserably now and again !  555555

 

I've come to believe over the years that we human beings are too hard on ourselves.

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I read a smallish variety of Buddhist writings in my younger days, there are a number of Buddhas. There are the 28 Buddhas described in the Buddhavamsa and not only these, according to the Avatamsaka Sutra(Flower Ornament Scripture), Gautama Buddha taught that he had previously existed in innumerable incarnations throughout past ages into pre history even, but yes the Gautama Buddha and his teachings are the ones most commonly referenced when we reference The Buddha, you'll note different statues in different places make Buddha appear fat or thin, young or old.

A lot of the teachings of The Buddha are actually heavily influenced by contemporary thoughts and philosophies of what is considered (at least by me anyway) a very philosophical time in India these include Jainism. Buddhism and Jainism are two branches of the sramana tradition that still exist today. Mahavira and Gautama Buddha were contemporaries, and according to the Pāli Canon, Gautama was aware of Mahavira's existence as well as the communities of Jain monastics.

 

A very interesting time and some great meditational literature (a profuse amount even) came about at that time, a lot of it seems to have been gathered together a couple hundred years after Gautama Buddha passed on and was possibly not exactly "original" to him but fascinating all the same.

 

Did you come across anything with reference to fucking TG's ?

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Did you come across anything with reference to fucking TG's ?

Kinda, my first serious girlfriend at the time (i was about 17) was half Thai (half Jamaican) her mum was an unbelievable flirt (looked a lot like the photo's I've seen of coconut Noi), one of the reasons I was reading up on Buddhism in the first place, she broke my heart so to speak, wish I'd known then about Thai girls and Pattaya, it would have made it much easier to get over her, had to settle on Wales and welsh (Rhyl) girls instead.

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Any off you UK based guys made this part off your life? 

 

Yes, I'd like to think so, anyway. Every morning for the last 3 years, every morning and sometimes through the day I say to myself, "Buddha within me, I give up, you do it." I'm going to give it about 20 more years to see if it works all the time!!

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Interesting. You never followed it through and made it part off your life?

I took quite a bit of it to heart, studied meditation and still practice it to this day, I find it helps with controlling my heart rate and blood pressure (along with the tablets, ha), it did appeal to me, all that inner calm and such but i am  also cognizant of other philosophies and live my life by my own strictures based upon the whole of my intellectual investigations (I have always had a gnawing curiosity), plus the sum of my experiences so far (and hopefully well into the future) with life and people, etc

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Buddhism, more precisely Vipassana meditation saved my life. Its not easy growing up as an autistic person of Indian origin in good ole' Dixie, Buddha's teachings help me cope and accept my situation for what it is. Seriously Siddharta Gautama was the most extraordinary person who ever existed.

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Hello mate, I never embraced Buddhism completely, but the elements that appealed to me yes;  tolerance; acceptance of one's own finite mortality; and the old Golden Rule.  

 

Understandably I fail miserably now and again !  555555

 

I've come to believe over the years that we human beings are too hard on ourselves.

 

I think us humans make life too difficult in general!

 

 

I thought this was fantastic!

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Kinda, my first serious girlfriend at the time (i was about 17) was half Thai (half Jamaican) her mum was an unbelievable flirt (looked a lot like the photo's I've seen of coconut Noi), one of the reasons I was reading up on Buddhism in the first place, she broke my heart so to speak, wish I'd known then about Thai girls and Pattaya, it would have made it much easier to get over her, had to settle on Wales and welsh (Rhyl) girls instead.

 

I was a late starter myself, my first full on sexual experience was with the mother of a younger boy at my School; years later when I met her quite by accident.

 

She was in her mid 40's and I only 20, she was drop dead gorgeous and liked the younger men.

 

We played for a few months or so, it was the best education possible for a young bloke !   5555555

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Buddhism, more precisely Vipassana meditation saved my life. Its not easy growing up as an autistic person of Indian origin in good ole' Dixie, Buddha's teachings help me cope and accept my situation for what it is. Seriously Siddharta Gautama was the most extraordinary person who ever existed.

 

Geezus mate you've had a tough run, my hats off to you for emerging in triumph over your disability. 

 

There but for the grace of whatever gods, go all of us.

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Geezus mate you've had a tough run, my hats off to you for emerging in triumph over your disability. 

 

There but for the grace of whatever gods, go all of us.

 

Thanks man I appreciate it, I am still very socially awkward but my disability (Nonverbal Learning disorder...converges with Aspergers) has given me an extremely high verbal IQ (99.99 percentile), I recently found this out and am in the process of learning Mandarin and Spanish. I guess everything has a silver lining eh?

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Yes, I'd like to think so, anyway. Every morning for the last 3 years, every morning and sometimes through the day I say to myself, "Buddha within me, I give up, you do it." I'm going to give it about 20 more years to see if it works all the time!!

 

How does that work? Is it like "Serenity now"?

 

serenity-now-544af7f25308d.gif

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Buddhism and how it is followed by Thais is fascinating.

I don't want to get too involved, but in very simplistic terms, Thais see "respect for their Mama and Papa" as the most important aspect of Thai Buddhist Practise. I am generalizing.

But, what I have learnt is that this 'rule' is one that can make or break any relationship with a Thai Lady.

Cheers,

H888

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Any off you guys recommend a good book on Buddhism?

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The Art of Living: Vipassana Meditation as Taught By S.N. Goenka by William Hart

 

I got this book 2nd hand so only cost pennies a good many years back (about 10 i think), despite what the title says, it is not really about meditation, if you are wanting to learn meditation there are plenty better, however it does have some interesting discussion points to meditate upon and some interesting Buddhist basic principals are discussed.

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Any off you guys recommend a good book on Buddhism?

Thanks for your question MunterHunter. By having to think about this, you have made me realize how foolish my life has been.

So thank you.

A really good book which has been made into a Movie,

It is called 'Peace is Every Step' by Thick Nhat Hanh. I would highly recommend this very easy to read book.

I haven't seen the Movie.

 

The Dalai Lama is the Buddhist Equivalent to Buddhism, as the Pope is to Catholicism/Christianity.

I was privileged to meet the Dalai Lama and spend time with him

in Dharamsala India. I also stayed with his brother when I was doing voluntary Medical Work at the Delek Hospital.

 

I can't remember the name of the book that Daniel Coleman wrote.....except for one very good book called 'Emotional Intelligence'.

Here is a link you may find useful https://hbr.org/2015/05/what-the-dalai-lama-taught-daniel-goleman-about-emotional-intelligence

 

Buddhism is a way to live life simply and respectfully.

 

Richard Gere played a very big role in promoting Buddhism in America and in fact bringing the Dalai Lama to 'The West'.

Here is a further link that may be beneficial...http://www.lionsroar.com/richard-gere-my-journey-as-a-buddhist/

 

If you want any info, please PM me.

Cheers,

H888

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This is my Copy of the book by Thick Nhat Hanh. Years ago I bought as many copies as I could and gave it to my friends. It has some very simple, practical and profound teachings. Reading the cover alone will give you some insights.

Sorry. But it's hard to rotate the photo on my iPad.

 

image.jpg

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Thanks for the info.

 

There is a buddhist centre near my home. They have a introduction day thing followed by a 1day/6 week course on meditation. Think im gonna go for that also.

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I don't consider Buddhism to be a religion but a philosophy. It is non-judgemental and I like the emphasis on living in the moment. The Buddhism practised by the Thai's is different to Tibetan Buddhism and is influenced by Hinduism. Centuries ago, as Captain Corageous has said, men got involved and used the popularity of Buddhism to promote their own ambitions and to control. They made "Rules" and set themselves up as the leaders of the religion in much the same way as the Romans did with Christianity.

if you ignore all that bullshit and stick to the principles it is a beautiful and peaceful philosophy. I never say I am a Buddhist as I don't like labels but I try to stay in contact with the philosophy and it helps me through the bad times.

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I don't consider Buddhism to be a religion but a philosophy. It is non-judgemental and I like the emphasis on living in the moment. The Buddhism practised by the Thai's is different to Tibetan Buddhism and is influenced by Hinduism. Centuries ago, as Captain Corageous has said, men got involved and used the popularity of Buddhism to promote their own ambitions and to control. They made "Rules" and set themselves up as the leaders of the religion in much the same way as the Romans did with Christianity.

if you ignore all that bullshit and stick to the principles it is a beautiful and peaceful philosophy. I never say I am a Buddhist as I don't like labels but I try to stay in contact with the philosophy and it helps me through the bad times.

Tibetan Buddhism when scrutinized is not at all what you might expect,  Just looking at the state of Buddhism before the Chinese occupation for instance and even looking at the disputes and practices of today's various sects in Tibet will take the shine off of it's artificial luster of peaceful enlightenment.

The Dalai Lama heads the Gelug sect (or school if you prefer) there are 3 other schools (I think, maybe more?)  that have come to blows before now and do not really get along, The Dalai Lama also practices the tradition of consulting Nechung during the New Year festivals (and whenever else he feels like) to "get advice" usually about changing a Buddhist ethic or principle. It has always looked to me as if the Dalai Lama wants to return Tibet to a strict Theocracy, which it was before the Chinese moved in, a very strict, caste ridden, feudal theocracy, very corrupt and not as enlightened as portrayed by the Hollywood adherents, although not as bad as revisionist Chinese would have you believe, probably somewhere in the middle.

 

As with most things in life you should read these teachings with an open mind and place them into context with what your experience and your "heart" says is right for you and your way of living, take what you need but don't believe everything that is said is equally applicable to your own "inherent nature" (some of the past life advice for instance, consequences and affects due to reincarnated personality traits and consequences,etc), that is a fools road to disillusionment.

There is plenty of good to be learned, which is why It resonates with me more than Judaic religious teachings and I find it combines well with my classical philosophers teachings, don't be fussed to much if your left hand is higher than your right or not when meditating, look to the spirit of the thoughts not the stricture of the belief.

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Thanks man I appreciate it, I am still very socially awkward but my disability (Nonverbal Learning disorder...converges with Aspergers) has given me an extremely high verbal IQ (99.99 percentile), I recently found this out and am in the process of learning Mandarin and Spanish. I guess everything has a silver lining eh?

 

Indeed, I have a now 30 year old Son who almost died at birth (one of twins) and he grew up with a learning disorder.

 

He struggled through schooling but emerged a wonderful young man, very compassionate, well mannered and well liked by everyone that knows him. 

 

So after schooling he started work with the local council and completed an Applied Science Diploma in Horticulture, then decided to try the Private Security Guard industry.

Gets a contract with the State Railways as a night security guard, decides to qualify as a security guard Dog specialist, then buys a young German Shepherd Dog and trains him.  

Meanwhile over the years he works out and build his physique up.

 

A couple of years experience later he applies for a postion with the State Corrections (Prison Guard) department, and gets the job. 

Transitions to Armed Response Team in the system, Dogs, Shotguns and Glocks.  

 

Then he meets a Girl who makes it happen for him, so he decides to pack in the career; gets his heavy Rig Truck license and starts earning $48 an hour driving night shifts.

 

So he and his girlfriend decide to lease a couple of Trucks and go into the overnight Freight business.

 

That was 3 years ago, they now employ 4 drivers full time and have 5 year contract with the Toll corporation, in addition to buying their own House.

 

So much for his learning disability;  FROM LITTLE THINGS BIG THINGS GROW.

 

YOU my friend can achieve more than anyone lacking your so called disabilities.

 

Why ?

 

Because you understand and accept the struggle.      

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