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phnom penh to pattaya


dudebrah
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anyone done it by bus ? or taxi ? any tips ?

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I flew then took a cab yo S-ville Taxi driver was good luckily. The vehicle in front of us nearly stopped for a cat running across the Rd. They have a law that you cannot use a headlight during the day, but up to you at night. My ride back to airport was during the day and much more relaxing and faster.

I considered the bus but it was 2 12 hr day's. vs 1 8 hr day that was actually 12 Hrs.

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PP-Poipet/Aranyaprathet-Pattaya:

 

The most comfortable way by road is a very early morning taxi ... just keep going along Monivong, past the New Market which you can see to your right, toward Canadia Bank, the one very high building in town, (it's before Canadia), and you'll see the taxis adjacent to the pavement and just a few meters off Monivong. The earlier you can get a taxi the better; share is $15-20 a seat, with pot luck on if or when others arrive to fill the taxi.

 

If you can leave by taxi before 5 you can get to the border relatively quickly as you avoid all the 6am-8am morning rush hour traffic congestion in Phnom Penh and outskirts which really slows down the buses' departure. But the taxi driving is hairy, and as well the drivers are constantly fielding phone calls from people in Poipet wanting to book a ride back into PP in the afternoon).

 

If it's coming up to 5.30am, and it looks like the taxi is not going to fill or you're still the only one, then get yourself by motorbike taxi immediately to the post office, about 2-3 minutes away, and you'll see Paramount Bus depot down one of the very short side streets heading to the river (standing on the post office steps it's the little road to the right).

 

NB: do NOT let the taxi driver lock any of your luggage in his boot, as that will trap you with him ... I always travel with just a small satchel so I'm OK, but the standard Khmer taxi-driver trick is to leave you with no other alternative but to sit and wait and wait until other passengers show.

 

Paramount is the first bus out and so it avoids the worst of the traffic.

 

When you get through the border, go to the motorbike taxis and ask to go to Aran's bus station. Opposite the 7/11 (which is the first thing you'll see), is the ground floor apartment which served as the old bus terminal for Aran-PP. The lady there has obviously lost the bus stop-off business, but even better she's now the agent for the mini-van run which is far more regular than the bus service and way, way, way faster and more comfortable. It's more expensive than the bus but still a steal, maybe about 250 baht.

 

Or, short and simple, book well ahead on Air Asia and fly for about the same price but hours faster !!

MY 99 CENT KINDLE: ... 1974 TRAVEL IN THAILAND, CAMBODIA AND SOUTH VIETNAM : http://www.amazon.co.uk/EXPLAINING-CAMBODIA-Part-Torn-Jagged-ebook/dp/B00L0LC8TO

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PP-Poipet/Aranyaprathet-Pattaya:

 

The most comfortable way by road is a very early morning taxi ... just keep going along Monivong, past the New Market which you can see to your right, toward Canadia Bank, the one very high building in town, (it's before Canadia), and you'll see the taxis adjacent to the pavement and just a few meters off Monivong. The earlier you can get a taxi the better; share is $15-20 a seat, with pot luck on if or when others arrive to fill the taxi.

 

If you can leave by taxi before 5 you can get to the border relatively quickly as you avoid all the 6am-8am morning rush hour traffic congestion in Phnom Penh and outskirts which really slows down the buses' departure. But the taxi driving is hairy, and as well the drivers are constantly fielding phone calls from people in Poipet wanting to book a ride back into PP in the afternoon).

 

If it's coming up to 5.30am, and it looks like the taxi is not going to fill or you're still the only one, then get yourself by motorbike taxi immediately to the post office, about 2-3 minutes away, and you'll see Paramount Bus depot down one of the very short side streets heading to the river (standing on the post office steps it's the little road to the right).

 

NB: do NOT let the taxi driver lock any of your luggage in his boot, as that will trap you with him ... I always travel with just a small satchel so I'm OK, but the standard Khmer taxi-driver trick is to leave you with no other alternative but to sit and wait and wait until other passengers show.

 

Paramount is the first bus out and so it avoids the worst of the traffic.

 

When you get through the border, go to the motorbike taxis and ask to go to Aran's bus station. Opposite the 7/11 (which is the first thing you'll see), is the ground floor apartment which served as the old bus terminal for Aran-PP. The lady there has obviously lost the bus stop-off business, but even better she's now the agent for the mini-van run which is far more regular than the bus service and way, way, way faster and more comfortable. It's more expensive than the bus but still a steal, maybe about 250 baht.

 

Or, short and simple, book well ahead on Air Asia and fly for about the same price but hours faster !!

 

Thanks Oldie ! great info

 

btw are you sure Air asia fly's from PP to Bangkok ?

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btw are you sure Air asia fly's from PP to Bangkok ?

 

definatly.... :GoldenSmile1:

I have a Problem..... I just can't decide if its a good problem or a bad problem...

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I've done it a couple of times. Once by taxi to Sihanoukville, boat (No road then) to Koh Khong then bus Khlong Yai to Pattaya. Another time I went by bus to Siem Riep, then a great boat ride to Battambang followed by a taxi to Aranyaprathet. It all depends on if you are in a hurry or not but these routes allow for some great breaks in your journey as stopovers. The route by boat via Battambang can actually be faster and more comfortable tham to the border from Siem Riep by road depending on the season (rainy or not).

         ความจริงเป็นสิ่งที่ไม่ตายแต่คนพูดความจริงอาจจะตาย                 

The truth is immortal but people who speak it aren't - Thai proverb

Karl's Thailand - My YouTube Channel

 

 

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The easy/boring way is to buy a bus ticket to Pattaya - $35 from a kiosk at Night Market last time I did it, but it is a fair trek.

 

The big bus to the border is OK. They stop just before at a restaurant and pre-process your paperwork, which works well. Some folk think it's a con and witter on, but just relax and have a cheap snack and drink and all will be well. Some Russians even got a taxi down rather than wait and it was funny to see them standing in line in the sun as we were ushered straight through.

After you cross into Thailand you're in the mini buses and it depends on your luck as they juggle the numbers going to Pattaya/Bangkok/wherever. It probably takes best part of 12 hours for the whole trip.

I only did it that way once and thereafter always finished up at Sihanoukville. Only about $8 down from PP, chill for a few nights and then $25 back to Pattaya - Basically the same trek as from PP but a bit shorter to the border.

 

Flying always sounds better - and is - but timewise you've got the taxi to PNH airport and taxi BKK to Pattaya plus check-in time and general waiting about.

Cost is obviously higher and don't forget to add the $25 airport tax.

 

Oldie's way sounds interesting - must read it again.

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I've done it a couple of times. Once by taxi to Sihanoukville, boat (No road then) to Koh Khong then bus Khlong Yai to Pattaya. Another time I went by bus to Siem Riep, then a great boat ride to Battambang followed by a taxi to Aranyaprathet. It all depends on if you are in a hurry or not but these routes allow for some great breaks in your journey as stopovers. The route by boat via Battambang can actually be faster and more comfortable tham to the border from Siem Riep by road depending on the season (rainy or not).

 

I have heard about the ferry service from sihanookville to Koh kong ot trat , but some travel sites say its no longer in operation ,

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I have heard about the ferry service from sihanookville to Koh kong ot trat , but some travel sites say its no longer in operation ,

I'm not surprised to be honest. There is now a road between the two places, when I last travelled that particular route the speedboat was the only option. The boat would be slow and expensive and noisy by comparison and no doubt there was a huge dip in demand once the road was completed. The boat ride on the other route though, from Siem Riep to Battambang was quite interesting as it twists its way through the mangrove swamps of the Tongle Sap.

         ความจริงเป็นสิ่งที่ไม่ตายแต่คนพูดความจริงอาจจะตาย                 

The truth is immortal but people who speak it aren't - Thai proverb

Karl's Thailand - My YouTube Channel

 

 

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I have heard about the ferry service from sihanookville to Koh kong ot trat , but some travel sites say its no longer in operation ,

I'm not surprised to be honest. There is now a road between the two places, when I last travelled that particular route the speedboat was the only option. The boat would be slow and expensive and noisy by comparison and no doubt there was a huge dip in demand once the road was completed. The boat ride on the other route though, from Siem Riep to Battambang was quite interesting as it twists its way through the mangrove swamps of the Tongle Sap.

 

Ah bless - the good old days.

 

I'm a relative newbie, but I think the bridges were finished three or more years ago and the speedboats became redundant almost straight after.

 

That road is a breeze now and some of us have done it on the scoots of course.

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Dr.Winston O'Boogie

 

 

Posted Yesterday, 07:09 PM

 

View Postdudebrah, on 29 June 2010 - 11:53 AM, said:

I have heard about the ferry service from sihanookville to Koh kong ot trat , but some travel sites say its no longer in operation ,

 

I'm not surprised to be honest. There is now a road between the two places, when I last travelled that particular route the speedboat was the only option. The boat would be slow and expensive and noisy by comparison and no doubt there was a huge dip in demand once the road was completed. The boat ride on the other route though, from Siem Riep to Battambang was quite interesting as it twists its way through the mangrove swamps of the Tongle Sap.

 

 

This forum sets off so many little memories I've buried but never recall....

Those Sihanoukville-Koh Kong boats, which started up in about the mid-late 1990s, were awful, primarily because they were river boats and not designed for the ocean. They were hellish at times, but for many years they were the only feasible route to Thailand other than the exorbitant, monopolized air route. Once the new road was built AND sealed then nobody wanted the boats.

 

Winston's talk of mangroves recalls my first crossing to Thailand, in Khmer New Year, 1992. Forgive a reminiscence, but it explains why I now willingly tolerate the long road journeys.

Cambodia had just reopened, and having waited 17 years to return I was just about first back in, but I had bugger all money. Got a basic job, and come New Year in April I decided I needed a taste of pattaya. At the time foreigners were not allowed outside Phnom Penh without a permit, but I decided to chance my arm.

 

There was no land travel to the border in those days, and in fact no authorized land border crossings, just the airport as the only entry-exit point. I heard there was a boat to Koh Kong leaving at about mid-day from Srey Ambil, which is a tiny inland river port some way off the mid-point turnoff halfway between Phnom Penh and Sihanoukville, so I got myself there, and boarded a ship.

 

About eight Khmer passengers and the crusty sea captain and his 1-2 man crew and some cargo set off in a wooden fishing boat, through mazes of very narrow waterways with vegetation often brushing the vessel, and it was mystically like something out of Apocalypse Now.

 

But then in early evening we hit the open sea. Holy Bejeezus, it was now like something out of Perfect Storm. We got pounded, bashed and whacked and tossed, and the captain was hollering and screaming and at one point about midnight in a rage he even blazed off a machine gun at the sky (a kind of Khmer custom -- don't ask !!)...

 

We survived the night and pulled wearily into Koh Kong. There was a young pimp on board with a couple of girls he was running into Thailand and he invited me to come along as "I know a way in". I agreed, largely because I had the hots for one of the girls, whose hairy armpits held me mesmerized.

 

However, the police grabbed me as we disembarked, and marched me into the adjacent station, the result being the pimp took one look at that and shook his head at me and disappeared. The cops asked if I knew I was not allowed out of Phnom Penh and I pleaded ignorance. Then the chief looked at me with narrowed eyes and asked if I planned to try to cross illegally into Thailand and I assured him I'd just come to see the beautiful Koh Kong.

 

The place was an absolute dive, way beyond Third World, more into Fourth or Fifth, and I checked into a grotty little wooden shack on stilts over the water which at least had some girls, and gave up on thoughts of Thailand. Note, this was not the Koh Kong town attached to the mainland that travelers pass through today: ... I was on the actual island.

 

Next morning I wandered the few hundred meters back to the port's jetty with my little bag, intending to return to Phnom Penh (again, this is not the port area of the later Koh Kong-Sihanoukville boats).

A guy on a longboat took one look and asked me if I wanted to go to Thailand. I glanced at the neighboring police station, which could see absolutely everything entering and leaving by sea, and it was empty because this was now the first official day of New Year. 'OK' I said on the spur of the moment and jumped in after changing some dollars into baht from someone hanging round.

 

My boatman was heavily hooded, with just eye slits to look through, and after only a short distance he pulled into land and pointed to a track leading up a hill. I began clambering up, and had absolutely no idea which country I was now in until I eventually crested and found a Thai lady selling sticky rice and mango under a big shady tree beside a road.... Heaven !!

 

And a vehicle was about to depart for Klong Yai so I got in and thought ' That was just TOO easy' ... and it was, because after only a matter of a kilometer or so a couple of heavily-armed Thai soldiers stepped out and waved us down, and to the left I saw a sizable Thai military base. I knew I was going to get done for crossing illegally, and froze in the middle of the back seat. But all I got to see of the soldiers' faces were their chins as they gave a cursory glance at the uniformed Thai sailor slumped lazily to my left against the window and waved us through.

 

I had a great couple of days in Pattaya, except that now I had to somehow get back through the military base, find a way across the water, and then evade the all-seeing Khmer police. I actually hadn't thought that far ahead when I'd impulsively jumped into the long boat, but I sure as hell mused on it now. First stroke of luck was I went past a place advertising runs to Cambodia! This was a big new thing for guys in Pattaya as Cambodia was this whacky place they couldn't imagine, so someone had done a deal with the Khmer authorities to run these foreigners in, and all those farang would enter without any paperwork, see Koh Kong for a couple of hours, then leave; all without any documentation occurring, just so those Westerners could say they had been to Cambodia.

 

Whacko. So that would get me past the Thai soldiers, and it did, but the guide explained to me that all the Westerners would hand their passports to those Khmer police at the jetty, then be given their passports back one at a time as they re-boarded the boat to return to Thailand. That was unfeasible for me, so I left the vehicle thereafter because the furious Khmer cops would be eagerly waiting to nab me.

 

So I wandered down to a little jetty and thought that even if I could get a boat of any kind back in, the cops would still see me. I sat there helplessly for about ten minutes, time which I would have spent pondering options if I'd been able to think of any, but just then a little vessel went past, saw me, and pulled in. The guy spoke a little English and I explained my problem but he just laughed and said "I am the king of Koh Kong. Come with me .. I stop at my house on the waterfront, not at the jetty." Sure enough we pulled in and moored at his house, probably a hundred or so meters before the police station.

 

I thanked him profusely and then I had to walk past the police to some lodgings, carrying my little bag, and I felt the cops' eyes burning into me as I went past, but they couldn't say anything as they had neither seen me leaving for Thailand nor arriving from there.

 

But I certainly never contemplated that again. I had fluked it all the way in and out, and even in Pattaya I'd had a moment as I used a travelers' cheque and watched the female money changer repeatedly going through my passport trying unsuccessfully to find my entry stamp before finally she mercifully gave up and handed over the baht.

 

Postscript: on the boat back to Phnom Penh, there was the pimp and the girls! They'd been caught trying to cross over, and he'd been heavily fined, and they'd all only just been released from 3-4 days in jail, so if I'd gone with them as originally agreed I would have got done. The pimp was so pissed off that I'd made it but he hadn't.

Edited by oldie

MY 99 CENT KINDLE: ... 1974 TRAVEL IN THAILAND, CAMBODIA AND SOUTH VIETNAM : http://www.amazon.co.uk/EXPLAINING-CAMBODIA-Part-Torn-Jagged-ebook/dp/B00L0LC8TO

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I'm not surprised to be honest. There is now a road between the two places, when I last travelled that particular route the speedboat was the only option. ...................

 

This forum sets off so many little memories I've buried but never recall....

Those Sihanoukville-Koh Kong boats were awful, primarily because they were river boats and not designed for the ocean. ........in Khmer New Year, 1992. Forgive a reminiscence, but it explains why I now willingly tolerate the long road journeys.

........................... Holy Bejeezus, .............................at one point about midnight in a rage he even blazed off a machine gun at the sky (a kind of Khmer custom -- don't ask !!)...

 

I agreed, largely because I had the hots for one of the girls, whose hairy armpits held me mesmerized.

....................................................

 

Holy Beejeezus indeed!

 

Amazing tale brilliantly told Sir!

Have you written your autobiography yet?

 

To think we witter on about how hard that road trip is.

Excuse me Mods but I think this Post deserves a place all of it's own, for fear of anyone missing it in here.

Oldie - I hope those 2 nights made it worthwhile and don't wait too long before you give us some more from way back when. I'd love to hear about what you got up to in Phnom Penh in 1992.

 

Thanks.

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Yes, great story Oldie. My own first trip wasn't until 96 and I flew. I really can't remember if a legal land crossing was an option for farangs back then (Maybe at Aranyaphrathet?). The first time I crossed by land at Hat Yai/Khlong Lek was 2001 and overland from Vietnam in 2002.

         ความจริงเป็นสิ่งที่ไม่ตายแต่คนพูดความจริงอาจจะตาย                 

The truth is immortal but people who speak it aren't - Thai proverb

Karl's Thailand - My YouTube Channel

 

 

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Thanks Oldie ! great info

 

btw are you sure Air asia fly's from PP to Bangkok ?

Air Asia is a timesaver/$$ saver,especially if you get one of their fare sales.I've done it twice and no flight was more than 50% full.

"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline - it

helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but

at the very least you need a beer."

-Frank Zappa

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Thanks for the kind words Edge.

 

Most of my truly whacky stuff would relate to 1974-5, but if you want something else from Phnom Penh of about 1992 then search titles for 'Careful, she might have crazy thai boyfriend' and I made a couple of submissions there.

MY 99 CENT KINDLE: ... 1974 TRAVEL IN THAILAND, CAMBODIA AND SOUTH VIETNAM : http://www.amazon.co.uk/EXPLAINING-CAMBODIA-Part-Torn-Jagged-ebook/dp/B00L0LC8TO

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Thanks for the kind words Edge.

 

Most of my truly whacky stuff would relate to 1974-5, but if you want something else from Phnom Penh of about 1992 then search titles for 'Careful, she might have crazy thai boyfriend' and I made a couple of submissions there.

 

I'll certainly go and look for your Thai BF posts, as your turn of phrase cracks me up.

 

I like Cambodia a lot. I've come to it very late - 2007 - but even now I think you can still get a feel for what happened there. I've been to S21 four times and twice spoken with the lady across the road who was 17yo when she and her family were marched out.

If you were there '74/75 that sounds pretty dangerous, never mind whacky!

I've watched the Killing Fields movie several times, but I'd love to hear what you were doing there and how things were from your perspective.

After the above tale I've no doubt you've got a lot more from back then. :GoldenSmile1:

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  • 2 months later...

I went by Sorya bus from Phnom Penh to Battambang, stopped over for 2 nights, then continue the journey to Bangkok.

 

The Sorya bus is OK, but slow. It took 5 hours from Phnom Penh to Battambang. It stopped 2 time for toilet and lunch, and several times for passengers on and off on the way. The journey to Poipet is better, less stop.

 

Does any bus company run an express bus, non-stop to cities from PP?

Is Capitol, Paramount, GST etc better/faster than Sorya bus?

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I went by Sorya bus from Phnom Penh to Battambang, stopped over for 2 nights, then continue the journey to Bangkok.

 

The Sorya bus is OK, but slow. It took 5 hours from Phnom Penh to Battambang. It stopped 2 time for toilet and lunch, and several times for passengers on and off on the way. The journey to Poipet is better, less stop.

 

Does any bus company run an express bus, non-stop to cities from PP?

Is Capitol, Paramount, GST etc better/faster than Sorya bus?

 

The Topic is about Phnom Penh to Pattaya, so I don't think he'd want to go via Battambang, Poipet and Bangkok, epic a jourmey though it may well be.

 

The bus ticket from PP - Pattaya is about $35 and it's big bus to the border then minibuses.

 

I don't know for sure, but I don't think any of the Cambodian buses pass through the border, in which case all those journeys to cities in other countries would involve changing buses.

I stand to be corrected as I haven't gone into Laos or VietNam by bus.

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Dr.Winston O'Boogie

 

 

Posted Yesterday, 07:09 PM

 

View Postdudebrah, on 29 June 2010 - 11:53 AM, said:

I have heard about the ferry service from sihanookville to Koh kong ot trat , but some travel sites say its no longer in operation ,

 

I'm not surprised to be honest. There is now a road between the two places, when I last travelled that particular route the speedboat was the only option. The boat would be slow and expensive and noisy by comparison and no doubt there was a huge dip in demand once the road was completed. The boat ride on the other route though, from Siem Riep to Battambang was quite interesting as it twists its way through the mangrove swamps of the Tongle Sap.

 

 

This forum sets off so many little memories I've buried but never recall....

Those Sihanoukville-Koh Kong boats, which started up in about the mid-late 1990s, were awful, primarily because they were river boats and not designed for the ocean. They were hellish at times, but for many years they were the only feasible route to Thailand other than the exorbitant, monopolized air route. Once the new road was built AND sealed then nobody wanted the boats.

 

Winston's talk of mangroves recalls my first crossing to Thailand, in Khmer New Year, 1992. Forgive a reminiscence, but it explains why I now willingly tolerate the long road journeys.

Cambodia had just reopened, and having waited 17 years to return I was just about first back in, but I had bugger all money. Got a basic job, and come New Year in April I decided I needed a taste of pattaya. At the time foreigners were not allowed outside Phnom Penh without a permit, but I decided to chance my arm.

 

There was no land travel to the border in those days, and in fact no authorized land border crossings, just the airport as the only entry-exit point. I heard there was a boat to Koh Kong leaving at about mid-day from Srey Ambil, which is a tiny inland river port some way off the mid-point turnoff halfway between Phnom Penh and Sihanoukville, so I got myself there, and boarded a ship.

 

About eight Khmer passengers and the crusty sea captain and his 1-2 man crew and some cargo set off in a wooden fishing boat, through mazes of very narrow waterways with vegetation often brushing the vessel, and it was mystically like something out of Apocalypse Now.

 

But then in early evening we hit the open sea. Holy Bejeezus, it was now like something out of Perfect Storm. We got pounded, bashed and whacked and tossed, and the captain was hollering and screaming and at one point about midnight in a rage he even blazed off a machine gun at the sky (a kind of Khmer custom -- don't ask !!)...

 

We survived the night and pulled wearily into Koh Kong. There was a young pimp on board with a couple of girls he was running into Thailand and he invited me to come along as "I know a way in". I agreed, largely because I had the hots for one of the girls, whose hairy armpits held me mesmerized.

 

However, the police grabbed me as we disembarked, and marched me into the adjacent station, the result being the pimp took one look at that and shook his head at me and disappeared. The cops asked if I knew I was not allowed out of Phnom Penh and I pleaded ignorance. Then the chief looked at me with narrowed eyes and asked if I planned to try to cross illegally into Thailand and I assured him I'd just come to see the beautiful Koh Kong.

 

The place was an absolute dive, way beyond Third World, more into Fourth or Fifth, and I checked into a grotty little wooden shack on stilts over the water which at least had some girls, and gave up on thoughts of Thailand. Note, this was not the Koh Kong town attached to the mainland that travelers pass through today: ... I was on the actual island.

 

Next morning I wandered the few hundred meters back to the port's jetty with my little bag, intending to return to Phnom Penh (again, this is not the port area of the later Koh Kong-Sihanoukville boats).

A guy on a longboat took one look and asked me if I wanted to go to Thailand. I glanced at the neighboring police station, which could see absolutely everything entering and leaving by sea, and it was empty because this was now the first official day of New Year. 'OK' I said on the spur of the moment and jumped in after changing some dollars into baht from someone hanging round.

 

My boatman was heavily hooded, with just eye slits to look through, and after only a short distance he pulled into land and pointed to a track leading up a hill. I began clambering up, and had absolutely no idea which country I was now in until I eventually crested and found a Thai lady selling sticky rice and mango under a big shady tree beside a road.... Heaven !!

 

And a vehicle was about to depart for Klong Yai so I got in and thought ' That was just TOO easy' ... and it was, because after only a matter of a kilometer or so a couple of heavily-armed Thai soldiers stepped out and waved us down, and to the left I saw a sizable Thai military base. I knew I was going to get done for crossing illegally, and froze in the middle of the back seat. But all I got to see of the soldiers' faces were their chins as they gave a cursory glance at the uniformed Thai sailor slumped lazily to my left against the window and waved us through.

 

I had a great couple of days in Pattaya, except that now I had to somehow get back through the military base, find a way across the water, and then evade the all-seeing Khmer police. I actually hadn't thought that far ahead when I'd impulsively jumped into the long boat, but I sure as hell mused on it now. First stroke of luck was I went past a place advertising runs to Cambodia! This was a big new thing for guys in Pattaya as Cambodia was this whacky place they couldn't imagine, so someone had done a deal with the Khmer authorities to run these foreigners in, and all those farang would enter without any paperwork, see Koh Kong for a couple of hours, then leave; all without any documentation occurring, just so those Westerners could say they had been to Cambodia.

 

Whacko. So that would get me past the Thai soldiers, and it did, but the guide explained to me that all the Westerners would hand their passports to those Khmer police at the jetty, then be given their passports back one at a time as they re-boarded the boat to return to Thailand. That was unfeasible for me, so I left the vehicle thereafter because the furious Khmer cops would be eagerly waiting to nab me.

 

So I wandered down to a little jetty and thought that even if I could get a boat of any kind back in, the cops would still see me. I sat there helplessly for about ten minutes, time which I would have spent pondering options if I'd been able to think of any, but just then a little vessel went past, saw me, and pulled in. The guy spoke a little English and I explained my problem but he just laughed and said "I am the king of Koh Kong. Come with me .. I stop at my house on the waterfront, not at the jetty." Sure enough we pulled in and moored at his house, probably a hundred or so meters before the police station.

 

I thanked him profusely and then I had to walk past the police to some lodgings, carrying my little bag, and I felt the cops' eyes burning into me as I went past, but they couldn't say anything as they had neither seen me leaving for Thailand nor arriving from there.

 

But I certainly never contemplated that again. I had fluked it all the way in and out, and even in Pattaya I'd had a moment as I used a travelers' cheque and watched the female money changer repeatedly going through my passport trying unsuccessfully to find my entry stamp before finally she mercifully gave up and handed over the baht.

 

Postscript: on the boat back to Phnom Penh, there was the pimp and the girls! They'd been caught trying to cross over, and he'd been heavily fined, and they'd all only just been released from 3-4 days in jail, so if I'd gone with them as originally agreed I would have got done. The pimp was so pissed off that I'd made it but he hadn't.

Great story Oldie, thanks for sharing. Sounds like you've had some grand adventures. Would love to have a beer and hear your stories if I get back to Cambodia.

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Great story Oldie, thanks for sharing. Sounds like you've had some grand adventures. Would love to have a beer and hear your stories if I get back to Cambodia.

 

I agree. Last he posted (in the Duch Trial thread) was that after about 18 years in Cambodia he was off back to the Australian mines, but hopefully he'll show up back here with more of his tales.

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