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Laow And Bpai Laow


pockets88
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Hi all i have being using rosetta stone to learn thai, it's biggest fault is that it does not explain things and you have to work it out for yourself

most of the time you do manage this but the use of bpai has me confused, in my books bpai means to go so why is it added to words like laow iwill give an exp

 

maa daai dern long jaak rot bpai laow

horse has walked down from vehicle,

 

i understand the use of daai for past tense and laow at the end to indicate the action is complete, here is another

 

puu ying daai bpert lin chak laow

woman has opened cash till

 

bpai has not being used this time, so how does it change the meaning?

it has also appeared with the word duai

 

nang suu lawm rawb bpai duai puu ying

a woman surrounded with books?

 

so how does this change a sentence?, and when do you use it?

i would be gratefull for any help on this

thanks

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bpai duai means go with or go also

 

bpai means go

 

bpai laow means go already

 

laow basically means already,

 

 

i think your asking it because some words appear different to literal translation

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Are you sure daai means 'has'? Can't be sure of the phonetic spelling but generally the word daai is a word that means 'can' or 'is possible'.

 

I tend to think of laew as a classifier for past tense.

 

baai - go

baai laew - already gone

 

"lin chak" ลิ้นชัก - Kinda thought that that word meant 'drawer'. Sure there wasn't another word after it like "ngern"

Edited by herds
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the word daai is a word that means 'can' or 'is possible'.

Dai can be used for past tense - " pom mai pai" means I'm not going - "pom mai dai pai" means I didn't go.

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Hi all i have being using rosetta stone to learn thai, it's biggest fault is that it does not explain things and you have to work it out for yourself

most of the time you do manage this but the use of bpai has me confused, in my books bpai means to go so why is it added to words like laow iwill give an exp

 

maa daai dern long jaak rot bpai laow

horse has walked down from vehicle,

 

i understand the use of daai for past tense and laow at the end to indicate the action is complete, here is another

 

puu ying daai bpert lin chak laow

woman has opened cash till

 

bpai has not being used this time, so how does it change the meaning?

it has also appeared with the word duai

 

nang suu lawm rawb bpai duai puu ying

a woman surrounded with books?

 

so how does this change a sentence?, and when do you use it?

i would be gratefull for any help on this

thanks

 

You don't ask simple questions do you :GoldenSmile1: I think that to explain just these few words fully would mean writing a book!

 

ไป

bpai

Usually means to go, it can also mean too much, it can add sense of continuation

You can also think of it as indicating movement away from ie เข้าไป kâo bpai and เข้ามา kâo maa both mean enter. In this case you can think of it in terms of go for Bpai and come for maa. Ie Go in and come in.

Chasing girls can be expensive

But it's more expensive if you catch one

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Are you sure daai means 'has'? Can't be sure of the phonetic spelling but generally the word daai is a word that means 'can' or 'is possible'.

 

I tend to think of laew as a classifier for past tense.

 

baai - go

baai laew - already gone

 

"lin chak" ลิ้นชัก - Kinda thought that that word meant 'drawer'. Sure there wasn't another word after it like "ngern"

yep your correct my mistake lin chak means draw and lin chak gep ngen is money till,

i t was a picture of a woman takeing or putting money into a till i think the reason i made that mistake is that i have noticed that sometimes thai's abbreviate long words and i jumped to conclusions

just finished a 14 hour night shift so i will say thanks to all and i will come back later with some more questions :Good_Post:

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Dai can be used for past tense - " pom mai pai" means I'm not going - "pom mai dai pai" means I didn't go.

 

Another small twist in the tale. To indicate past tense, mai dai must be placed before the verb.

Pom mai dai pai - I didn't go.

Pom pai mai dai - I couldn't go (unable to go).

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bpai duai means go with or go also

 

bpai means go

 

bpai laow means go already

 

laow basically means already,

 

 

i think your asking it because some words appear different to literal translation

if i do a literal translation it does not make sense i.e woman surrounded go with book that is why i thought bpai must have a different meaning when used this way

let me put the question another way, when do you use bpai laow and bpai duai in the sentance and when do you use just laow or duai is there some rules that you follow?

the use of bpai and maa for coming and going is simple compared to this

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Mai dii bpy- can't go or didn't go

 

dii - able or a past indicator

 

Always gets me confused especially when they start throwing laew into the sentence as well.

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Pai is used in many different ways apart of the obvious meaning "to go". It can mean to excess e.g "phaang pai"= Too expensive. It can also indicate an action that happened in the past i.e "Khaw ook pai laew" = He/she has left already. I think that these two are probably the least understood uses of the word.

         ความจริงเป็นสิ่งที่ไม่ตายแต่คนพูดความจริงอาจจะตาย                 

The truth is immortal but people who speak it aren't - Thai proverb

Karl's Thailand - My YouTube Channel

 

 

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nang suu lawm rawb bpai duai puu ying

a woman surrounded with books?

if i do a literal translation it does not make sense i.e woman surrounded go with book that is why i thought bpai must have a different meaning when used this way

 

As I said before - you ask difficult questions.

This sentence is a bit beyond my capabilities, are you sure of the structure?

 

I often fail miserably at sentence structure, but I would think that

 

ผู้หญิงล้อมรอบไปด้วยหนังสื

บางเล่ม

 

pôo yĭng lóm rôp bpai dûay năng-sĕu baang lêm

 

I could well be wrong here, so feel free to call me an idiot!

 

I will try to explain bpai dûay when used in similar sentences as I think I understand it.

 

Usually bpai dûay, when following a noun, means go together with, go along with etc.

But

When following a verb it can be taken as "Be verb Of/by...

 

For example เต็มไปด้วย .....dtem bpai dûay ....be full of...

 

ล้อมรอบไปด้ ....lóm rôp bpai dûay....be surrounded by

 

 

This is my take on it, the meaning changes when it follows a verb, but I have no reference to back this up, it's just my opinion.

Edited by Loong

Chasing girls can be expensive

But it's more expensive if you catch one

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I guess we all learn in different ways. Personally I've always just observed the ways that Thai people use the words and imitated, after a while that particular use of a word just seems to fall into place and I find that I can construct my own sentences in the same way. As I said earlier, IMO a lot of the confusion of the use of this word can be explained by the fact that it can also mean "to excess" or "too much".

 

Thai words only sometimes can be translated into English words and the meaning is the same 100% of the time. I've always found it more helpfull to not try to translate all the individual words in a sentence into English but rather to translate the overall meaning of the sentence.

         ความจริงเป็นสิ่งที่ไม่ตายแต่คนพูดความจริงอาจจะตาย                 

The truth is immortal but people who speak it aren't - Thai proverb

Karl's Thailand - My YouTube Channel

 

 

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Dr Winston,

you can help us here, how do you say the sentence "a woman surrounded with books" ...?

Chasing girls can be expensive

But it's more expensive if you catch one

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Dr Winston,

you can help us here, how do you say the sentence "a woman surrounded with books" ...?

I would say "phuying roop nangsuu" or even "phuying roop nangsuu pai" the "pai" emphasising that she is surrounded by the books.

         ความจริงเป็นสิ่งที่ไม่ตายแต่คนพูดความจริงอาจจะตาย                 

The truth is immortal but people who speak it aren't - Thai proverb

Karl's Thailand - My YouTube Channel

 

 

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Mee nag soo rorb rorb dtua poo ying = have the books around the woman

 

Not sure if this is right but this would be my guess at it

 

Got my head around bpy laew but bpy duay is a little more dicfficult

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Mee nag soo rorb rorb dtua poo ying = have the books around the woman

 

Not sure if this is right but this would be my guess at it

 

Got my head around bpy laew but bpy duay is a little more dicfficult

Yes, your way of saying it would certainly be more precise. I must admit that the "pai duay" used in the context that it appears in the sentence quoted in the OP doesn't make much sense to me either.

         ความจริงเป็นสิ่งที่ไม่ตายแต่คนพูดความจริงอาจจะตาย                 

The truth is immortal but people who speak it aren't - Thai proverb

Karl's Thailand - My YouTube Channel

 

 

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I would say "phuying roop nangsuu" or even "phuying roop nangsuu pai" the "pai" emphasising that she is surrounded by the books.

 

Sorry, I was rather hoping that you would let me know if this sentence makes sense or not, using bpai dûay

 

ผู้หญิงล้อมรอบไปด้วยหนังสื

บางเล่ม

 

pôo yĭng lóm rôp bpai dûay năng-sĕu baang lêm

Edited by Loong

Chasing girls can be expensive

But it's more expensive if you catch one

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Sorry, I was rather hoping that you would let me know if this sentence makes sense or not, using bpai dûay

 

ผู้หญิงล้อมรอบไปด้วยหนังสื

บางเล่ม

 

pôo yĭng lóm rôp bpai dûay năng-sĕu baang lêm

It does make sense if you think of it as meaning "with" i.e "a lady surrounded with some books". Much the same as you might say "deen thaaang duay khwaam phlootpai" = travel with safety (travel safely). The pai in the first sentence emphasises the fact that she is surrounded.

         ความจริงเป็นสิ่งที่ไม่ตายแต่คนพูดความจริงอาจจะตาย                 

The truth is immortal but people who speak it aren't - Thai proverb

Karl's Thailand - My YouTube Channel

 

 

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bpai is go, or to go, or can you go. Used slightly differently depending on the sentence.

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bpai is go, or to go, or can you go. Used slightly differently depending on the sentence.

 

Bpai is a lot more complex than that and it never means "Can you go" unless you can give an example of this useage. ?

Edited by Loong

Chasing girls can be expensive

But it's more expensive if you catch one

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As I said before - you ask difficult questions.

This sentence is a bit beyond my capabilities, are you sure of the structure?

 

I often fail miserably at sentence structure, but I would think that

 

ผู้หญิงล้อมรอบไปด้วยหนังสื

บางเล่ม

 

pôo yĭng lóm rôp bpai dûay năng-sĕu baang lêm

 

I could well be wrong here, so feel free to call me an idiot!

 

I will try to explain bpai dûay when used in similar sentences as I think I understand it.

 

Usually bpai dûay, when following a noun, means go together with, go along with etc.

But

When following a verb it can be taken as "Be verb Of/by...

 

For example เต็มไปด้วย .....dtem bpai dûay ....be full of...

 

ล้อมรอบไปด้ ....lóm rôp bpai dûay....be surrounded by

 

 

This is my take on it, the meaning changes when it follows a verb, but I have no reference to back this up, it's just my opinion.

 

this is the exact word order ผู้หญิงล้อมรอบไปด้วยหนังสื

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This is quite interesting for me this "bpy duay".

It is a lot more complex than I first thought. I can get usually get my head round words that don't translate into English but having big trouble with this one. Could we get a few more sentences as examples so I can see more examples of it in context? Cheers

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This is quite interesting for me this "bpy duay".

It is a lot more complex than I first thought. I can get usually get my head round words that don't translate into English but having big trouble with this one. Could we get a few more sentences as examples so I can see more examples of it in context? Cheers

I think that quoting just the two words "pai duay" together might be confusing the issue a little. Of course "pai duay" is a phrase that most Thai speakers will be familiar with, meaning; "go too" or "go together".

 

In this case, however I the "pai" just emphasises the previous words and the duay just means "with".

 

Simple examples of "pai" emphasising other words that spring to mind are; maak pai = too much, klai pai= too near or too far (depending on tone of course).

 

An example of duay being equivelent to the English word "with" is. deen thaang duay khwaam phlootphai= travel with safety.

 

Although I'd never come across that sentence before I found that it made sense to me once I stopped thinking of the words "pai duay" as being a phrase rather than two seperate words that just happen to follow on from each other.

         ความจริงเป็นสิ่งที่ไม่ตายแต่คนพูดความจริงอาจจะตาย                 

The truth is immortal but people who speak it aren't - Thai proverb

Karl's Thailand - My YouTube Channel

 

 

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I think that quoting just the two words "pai duay" together might be confusing the issue a little. Of course "pai duay" is a phrase that most Thai speakers will be familiar with, meaning; "go too" or "go together".

 

In this case, however I the "pai" just emphasises the previous words and the duay just means "with".

 

Simple examples of "pai" emphasising other words that spring to mind are; maak pai = too much, klai pai= too near or too far (depending on tone of course).

 

An example of duay being equivelent to the English word "with" is. deen thaang duay khwaam phlootphai= travel with safety.

 

Although I'd never come across that sentence before I found that it made sense to me once I stopped thinking of the words "pai duay" as being a phrase rather than two seperate words that just happen to follow on from each other.

thanks that is the answer i was looking for bpai/pai having a different use and not meaning exactly what is written , so i assume the same applys to bpai laow it is just emphasises that someting is done and finished

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I think that quoting just the two words "pai duay" together might be confusing the issue a little. Of course "pai duay" is a phrase that most Thai speakers will be familiar with, meaning; "go too" or "go together".

 

In this case, however I the "pai" just emphasises the previous words and the duay just means "with".

 

Simple examples of "pai" emphasising other words that spring to mind are; maak pai = too much, klai pai= too near or too far (depending on tone of course).

 

An example of duay being equivelent to the English word "with" is. deen thaang duay khwaam phlootphai= travel with safety.

 

Although I'd never come across that sentence before I found that it made sense to me once I stopped thinking of the words "pai duay" as being a phrase rather than two seperate words that just happen to follow on from each other.

here is another one with bpai หมวกใบนี้เป็นของผู้หญง

which i think says muak bpai nii bpen kawng puu ying this is a womans hat so if i understand what you are saying the bpai is driving home the point that this is a womans hat???????????

i hope im getting this otherwise i am going for a bottle of vodka :GoldenSmile1:

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