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DVT - How seriously do consider this?


LISBON

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Deep vein thrombosis"DVT"

To be honest although I knew of this I never really paid any attention to it. However, in the last few days I've learned a lot!

The BM's who know me, will appreciate that I'm not a fat unhealthy guy, quite to the contrary. Although in my middle 50's I take pride in my weight, appearance, diet and fitness. But here am I writing from my hospital bed.

 

So, here's the story so far;

I've been travelling to Asia for more years than I care to remember but now only manage my 3 annual trips to Patts. Shortly after my return home in May earlier this year I noticed that my daily run around Regent's park (London) was a little more difficult, especially on the inclines. Always concerned about my health I booked in to see my doctor. I told him that something wasn't quite right and I needed to find out what it was. After a few weeks I was back to normal, but during this period, I had had blood tests, x-rays and scans, even had the STD tests at the hospital to make sure it wasn't that. Every single test was clear. Doctor put it down to being dehydrated, so I started drinking a lot more water.

Over the next few months I noticed the odd few days where I was out of breath during strenuous exercise, but just carried on, that's my nature. No problems on my July trip everything was perfectly normal, had a superb time in Patts, my tgf as sweet as always

The next couple of months passed ok and soon we were in November and sitting in Heathrow airport waiting for my 3rd dream trip of the year to begin.

Again, thanks to my tgf and a few visits to Soi 6 I had another awesome trip.

On the last day though I did something I don't normally do, instead of trying to grab a few hours sleep, my gf and I stayed at a bar until 3am. My taxi arrived at August Suites 05.30 so absolutely no sleep, but knew there was a long flight waiting for me and with a few brandys should get some good sleep.

I eventually arrived back home at 22.00, I live about one hour from London.

Although absolutely shattered, first night I didn't get a good night's sleep, thought I was catching flu, next day felt rough all day with a stomach bug, couldn't eat. Went to bed early but got up to vomit quite severely at midnight, 2am woke up with pains in my legs after a quick massage (less the thaI girl to give it) the pain passed, back to sleep until 4am, same again but this time the massage doesn't work on my left leg, have to get up. Go down to watch tv, drink coffee and take several paracetamol. Decided that I needed a doctor, I was feeling really rough now. Surgery opened at 9.30, so 9 o'clock went up to the bathroom for the sss, on the way to the bedroom, things got worse, all I remember is sitting down on the floor because I couldn't make the bed, I woke up 30 minutes later, what the fuck! Got up walked to my bed and I started to go again! Anyhow, phoned the doctor who came to see me at home shortly after 12. She thought that I had picked up a virus on the plane and that I was suffering from dehydration. Funny, I seem to have heard that before! 2 days later my breathlessness was very apparent even on just walking up one flight of stairs. This is not good me thinks, I'm used to running 30 miles a week! So got my son to take me to evening surgery 6 o'clock appointment with the same doctor.

The outcome was to book me in for a blood test at the surgery the following day and then book me in for x-rays. Ok been through this before but maybe they'll find something this time!

Anyhow, sat watching tv later that evening, at about 9 o'clock there was a knock on the door, it was the doctor, she says that she had given this a lot of thought and and wasn't happy to leave it to the next day, she had arranged for me to go to the hospital immediately. She thought that there was a possibility that I had a blood clot on my lung, wow, life's full of surprises!

So arrived at the hospital around 22.00 had blood tests and x-rays. The hospital wouldn't allow me to go home, they were 80% sure it was a clot, but my general health and fitness appeared to be masking the problem.

Yesterday, 01 Dec, I went for a VQ scan of my lungs, wow, an amazing machine and the photos it produced, unbelievable. Anyhow, there was the proof in it's full glory, I was Just about surviving on one lung! I had more than one clot, shit really does happen.

The consultant said I'm lucky to be alive and without question, the state of my health saved me the day I passed out.

So, staying in hospital for about 7 days until my treatment has been introduced successfully, I will be on Warfarin (rat poison) to thin my blood. Unfortunately, my next trip to Pattaya March will have to be cancelled as the consulate says its too soon to be on a long-haul flight again, well you've got to get your priorities right, don't you? How long is a boat ride to Thailand?

Perhaps this has been a very boring read for many BM's but maybe for some it could help them from ending up in the same situation.

If I can offer any advice please read about dvt and how to avoid it.

 

Thanks for reading and apologies for any spelling mistakes, as I've listed this from my mobile phone.Lisbon

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I GOT IT ON MY FIRST TRIP 9 YEARS AGO FELL ASLEEP FOR 9 HOURS ON THE FLIGHT HOME , TOOK 6 MONTH TO GET OVER IT , BEEN BACK MANY TIMES NEVER SLEEP ON THE PLANE AND KEEP MOVING SOMETIMES FEELS LIKE I HAVE WALKED TO tHAILAND LOL

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wow bud, put on the lottery cause your one lucky guy, you go down with an embolisum there aint much chance of them bringing you back.

 

good to hear your alright bud and all the best with a speedy recovery

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What causes this

Tony Montana: What you lookin' at? You all a bunch of fuckin' assholes. You know why? You don't have the guts to be what you wanna be? You need people like me. You need people like me so you can point your fuckin' fingers and say, "That's the bad guy." So... what that make you? Good? You're not good. You just know how to hide, how to lie. Me, I don't have that problem. Me, I always tell the truth. Even when I lie. So say good night to the bad guy! Come on. The last time you gonna see a bad guy like this again, let me tell you. Come on. Make way for the bad guy. There's a bad guy comin' through! Better get outta his way!

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Just Google dvt there's a load about it

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Thanks mate, Yeh a full recovery is the only thing on my mind at the moment and then it's planning my next trip!

wow bud, put on the lottery cause your one lucky guy, you go down with an embolisum there aint much chance of them bringing you back.

 

good to hear your alright bud and all the best with a speedy recovery

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Just Google dvt there's a load about it

 

nO ..Im too lazy...........I demand to be told......................now

Tony Montana: What you lookin' at? You all a bunch of fuckin' assholes. You know why? You don't have the guts to be what you wanna be? You need people like me. You need people like me so you can point your fuckin' fingers and say, "That's the bad guy." So... what that make you? Good? You're not good. You just know how to hide, how to lie. Me, I don't have that problem. Me, I always tell the truth. Even when I lie. So say good night to the bad guy! Come on. The last time you gonna see a bad guy like this again, let me tell you. Come on. Make way for the bad guy. There's a bad guy comin' through! Better get outta his way!

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A recent study tried to reconstruct the conditions that lead to DVT but did the study on the ground. To cut a long story short they concluded that, coupled with long periods of inactivity in cramped circumstances, the increased risk of DVT whilst on long haul flights was down to the very poor air quality in the cabin! The increase in the occurence of DVT on flights was since the banning of smoking and the fact that airlines now don't divert as much power as they used to to the airconditioning systems because they don't percieve they have to becuase the air seems cleaner because of the lack of cigarette smoke. Hence they can save money by saving power and saving fuel.

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To those that say Flying Biz Class is a waste of Money Oh no it's not. Also got to love those DVT Stockings you can buy.

 

And do you have to cancel the March Trip Nah take a Cruise over to Thailand no need to Fly 5555

 

DVT's are bad news get well soon Matey

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To those that say Flying Biz Class is a waste of Money Oh no it's not. Also got to love those DVT Stockings you can buy.

 

And do you have to cancel the March Trip Nah take a Cruise over to Thailand no need to Fly 5555

 

DVT's are bad news get well soon Matey

 

Thanks for your wishes mate, unfortunately I'm still working, well, I will be after my recovery or else I would be booking a slow boat to Thailand. 5555

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It is more inspiring and you was blessed. Your fitness made it that smooth.

 

get well soon.

<img src=http://createcaptions.com/ca/im/gi%5E_%5Ehandwritten%5E_%5E1%5E_%5E0%5E_%5EThe+Unrated+Trip+8th+May%5E_%5E.gif border=0>

XTC in search for some Ecstasy TR <a href="http://www.pattayapeopleradio.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.pattayapeopleradio.com/archive/224/ppt_radio_link_120x150.jpg" alt="Pattaya People Radio Thailand" border="0" width="120" height="150" ></a>

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i always pop 300mg aspirin an hour before a long haul flight, and make sure i take a brief walk along the aisles every two hours whilst in flight, keeps the blood moving around and allows me to leech at the eva girls up close.

IF YOU STAND FOR NOTHING, YOU WILL FALL FOR ANYTHING

babydollsaddict.gif

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I worked for an airline in Public Relations, and we often dealt with DVT lawsuits. It is a real concern.

 

I always try to get an aisle seat, especially on long flights, so I can get up, stretch and walk a bit. If I find myself blocked in, I always try to do leg exercises (tensing and relaxing muscles) to keep the veins flexing and the blood flowing so it doesn't pool and clot. I think taking aspirin before a flight is also a good idea. (It doesn't take much to thin the blood, so don't overdo it.)

 

I would love to fly first class, so I could lie flat and sleep on my flights, but the wallet and the bank account won't let me.

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You were Lucky Lisbon... Thanks for giving us the awareness of DVT... You should get your blood checked every two/Three months to make sure .. Hope you will recover ASAP.... If you are going to Thailand next time, make sure your health is good before the flight.. Last March, I had bleeding Ulcer in my stomach, and was going to Thailand in April, My Doctor warned me that i wont be covered by the insurance if i get Ulcers again in Thailand because I had record of that illness few weeks previously... But i went ahead against Doctor orders , but end up sick in Guesthouse for 5 days in bed with existing Illness.. Was lucky that i was not needed at hospital when the Tablets(from Ireland) had worked... Back in Ireland in May, Was in Hospital again in October with the same illness, got four bag of blood transfusion.. So i have to watch my health for the first three months to travel to be eligible for insurance if get same illness in Thailand thereafter... Best of luck on your health

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Maybe this will help a few avoid DVT

 

 

DVT and flying

 

Medical papers have been published since the 1950s about a possible link between deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and air travel. However, it was the publicity surrounding 2 unexpected deaths from pulmonary embolism — a blood clot travelling from the legs to the lungs — after long-haul air travel in 2000 that sparked renewed interest in the issue and much public debate.

Each year, DVT occurs in about 1-2 of every 1,000 people in the general population and in up to one-third of people who have had major surgery. Scientific study to quantify the risk of DVT posed by air travel — although it is suspected to be small in most people — is ongoing.

In the meantime, if you’re planning to travel by air, it’s a good idea to be aware of DVT and its symptoms, and to follow the currently accepted advice aimed at helping to prevent DVT.

What is DVT?

 

DVT is a condition in which a blood clot or ‘thrombus’ forms in the deep veins of the legs.

The return of blood from these deep veins to the heart is made more difficult by the force of gravity and the relatively long distance that blood needs to travel back to the heart, compared with return from other parts of the body.

The veins in the legs therefore use the squeezing, pump-like action of the leg muscles — as occurs with normal walking — and a system of non-return (one-way) valves in the walls of these veins to help move blood back towards the heart.

If the blood flow from the legs to the heart is further hampered, for example, by a person not moving around for a long time, then blood can pool in the leg veins, sometimes leading to a clot forming inside the leg veins — so-called deep vein thrombosis.

What are the symptoms of DVT?

 

DVT can result in no symptoms, or it can cause swelling and pain in the affected leg, for example, pain in the calf when the foot is flexed upwards.

Although DVT is a serious condition, it is the relatively rare complications of DVT that can be life-threatening. One such complication involves a piece of the blood clot in the leg vein breaking away and travelling through the circulation to lodge in a small blood vessel elsewhere in the body, blocking blood supply in this area. This fragment of the original clot is called an embolus.

An embolus that lodges in a blood vessel in the lungs results in the life-threatening condition called pulmonary embolism (PE). Symptoms of PE include shortness of breath, chest pain and, in the extreme, collapse and death due to respiratory failure and lack of blood flowing from the lungs back to the heart.

How is DVT diagnosed?

 

Diagnosis usually involves a special type of ultrasound scan of the leg called a duplex ultrasound. If this test does not show a DVT but the doctor still suspects a DVT based on the symptoms, then further tests such as venography may be carried out. Venography uses an X-ray image to track the distribution of a special dye injected into the deep veins of the leg. If DVT is being considered as a diagnosis, but is not thought to be likely, a simple blood test called a D-dimer may be ordered instead of an ultrasound.

How is DVT treated?

 

If symptoms are confined to the leg, the main aim of treatment is to prevent complications such as an embolus. This usually involves giving 2 medications to thin the blood. The first is given by injections under the skin (which can be done at home), or sometimes an intravenous infusion (this necessitates admission to hospital). The first medication is necessary because the second medication, usually warfarin tablets, takes several days to become effective. Once the warfarin is working well, the injections or infusion can be stopped.

In addition, you will be advised to elevate the leg and wear a compression stocking. The blood thinning tablets are usually continued for several months. Throughout treatment, blood samples are taken to monitor the blood’s clotting ability to make sure that it is ‘thin’ enough but not so ‘thin’ that bleeding becomes a high risk.

Pulmonary embolism requires urgent medical treatment that centres on measures to support heart and lung function, pain relieving medication and, again, blood thinning medication.

Who gets DVT?

 

Several factors, unrelated to travel, have been recognised as increasing the risk of a person getting DVT (see table). Your likelihood of getting DVT is thought to increase with the number of risk factors for DVT that you have.

(The following 2 tables are based on Chapter 6 of the 5th Report of the Select Committee on Science and Technology, UK Parliament, entitled ‘Air Travel and Health’, published in November 2000 and have been updated from a 2005 review by Australian experts.) Factors considered to increase the risk of DVT

(‘risk factors’ for DVT) Increasing age above 40 years (especially being elderly) Being pregnant or recently having had a baby Having had a DVT or pulmonary embolism previously or having a family member who has had a DVT Having impaired blood clotting, especially any disorder that increases the tendency of your blood to clot Having major medical disorders, e.g. chronic cardiorespiratory disease, inflammatory bowel disease, nephrotic syndrome or myeloproliferative disorders Having cancer either now or in the past Having a recent major injury or recent surgery, especially involving the abdomen or legs Taking oestrogen hormone therapy or the contraceptive pill (especially if started within the last 2 weeks) Being immobile for one or more days (for example as a result of being ill in hospital or following major surgery, wearing a plaster cast or having a paralysed leg) Losing body fluids, for example through dehydration, which can make your blood more viscous (‘sticky’) Smoking* Being obese (body mass index over 30)* Having varicose veins* *Experts differ in their views as to whether these factors increase the risk of DVT.

It is also suspected that some characteristics of long-distance travel by car or train, and of air travel, may be risk factors for DVT because, for example, they can hinder the return flow of blood from the legs and/or make the blood more likely to clot. Travel-related factors that may increase the risk of DVT Road, rail and air Increasing age above childhood Travelling for a long time Frequently undertaking long-distance travel Being immobile (and this can happen just as easily in business class as in economy class) Being constrained by seating, especially having insufficient leg-room Sitting and sleeping in positions during travel that discourage return blood flow from the legs Wearing tight underwear and/or clothes that restrict your movement For obese people: having their immobility and seating discomfort made worse by their extra weight For tall or short people: having their immobility and constrained seating and posture made worse by their height For smokers: the psychological effects and the effects on their bodies of abiding by a non-smoking policy Air (These are aircraft cabin factors that are considered to increase the risk of DVT.) Lowered air pressure resulting in distension of the abdomen which slows down return blood flow from the legs Lowered oxygen levels and/or pressure resulting in an increased tendency of blood to clot Low humidity affecting the body’s fluid balance** High consumption of alcohol and caffeine resulting in dehydration** Restricted mobility due to aircraft safety procedures and cabin-crew service Increasingly long non-stop flight sectors ** These factors are not unique to the aircraft cabin.

Air travel and the risk of DVT

 

An ongoing investigation by the World Health Organization (WHO) — WHO Research Into Global Hazards of Travel (WRIGHT) Project on Air Travel and Venous Thromboembolism — has found that the risk of DVT approximately doubles after a long-haul flight (more than 4 hours). This increased risk also applies to other forms of travel (such as car, bus or train) where people are exposed to prolonged seated immobility. The risk increases with the duration of travel and with multiple flights within a short period.

The WHO research also revealed that the risk of DVT increased significantly when other risk factors were present. Factors that contribute to the increased risk of travel-related DVT include obesity, extremes of height, use of oral contraceptives and pre-existing blood clotting abnormalities. The absolute risk of DVT in healthy passengers per long-haul flight (more than 4 hours) was found to be about 1 in 6000.

If you are planning to travel by air, and you know or suspect that you have any predisposing risk factors for DVT, you should discuss your risk of DVT with your doctor and find out what precautions you should take, and whether or not it is advisable for you to travel.

General precautions to take when travelling by air

 

Current advice suggests that, where possible, air travellers should adhere to the following precautions to help prevent DVT.

  • Drink plenty of water during the flight.
  • Avoid alcohol and caffeinated drinks before and during the flight.
  • Wear clothing that does not restrict your movement and avoid tight underwear.
  • Don’t take sleeping tablets when flying as the effect of these will further limit your mobility.
  • If possible, don’t let your thighs press on the edge of your seat — slide your legs and bottom forward so that the angle between your legs and abdomen is more open and your bottom is nearer the front of the seat. (This may not be possible if you are tall or have long legs.)
  • Use footrests where available or rest your feet on luggage to get your feet up.
  • Do in-flight exercises every half-hour throughout the flight that include flexing and stretching your legs and feet.
  • Occasionally, and only if it is safe to do so, take a walk around the aircraft cabin.

People with pre-existing risk factors for DVT

 

If you have pre-existing risk factors for DVT you may need to take additional precautions such as wearing prescribed support stockings or taking prescribed blood thinning medication, as discussed with your doctor.

In-flight exercises

 

Here is a sequence of in-flight exercises that you can do every half-hour during a flight as a precaution against getting DVT. The leg exercises aim to encourage blood flow from your legs to your heart and the upper body exercises are aimed at improving your circulation overall. ex_foot_circles.gif1. Foot circles.Lift your feet off the floor. Moving both feet together, draw an imaginary circle with each big toe so that each foot rotates about the ankle joint. Continue several times in one direction, then repeat in the other direction. ex_knee_curls.gif4. Knee curls.Sitting upright, gently lean forward while at the same time raising one knee. Grasp the knee with both arms and gently pull the leg towards your chest as you then lean back. Hold for 15 seconds, then release and gently lower the leg. Do the same for the other leg. Repeat the sequence 10 times. ex_heel_lift2.gif2. Heel lift/Toe lift. Start with your feet flat on the floor. Then lift your heels as high as is comfortable while leaving your toes and the balls of your feet on the floor. Lower your heels and repeat several times. Now leave your heels on the floor and gently lift your toes and the front of your feet off the floor, thus flexing your ankle as far as is comfortable. Lower and repeat several times. ex_neck_stretches3.gif5. Neck stretches. Start with your head in an upright position. Gently drop your right ear towards your right shoulder as far as is comfortable. Then gently roll your head forwards until you are looking down at your lap. Finally roll your head gently up towards your left shoulder, then lift your head to the upright position. Alternate the direction and repeat several times. ex_knee_raises.gif3. Knee raises.Sitting upright with your feet flat on the floor, lift one leg up while keeping your knee bent, hold for 2-3 seconds, then lower. Do the same with the other leg. Repeat the sequence at least 20 times for each leg. ex_shoulder_roll.gif6. Shoulder rolls.Sitting comfortably, roll your shoulders gently backwards, continuing in a circular motion, several times. Repeat the circles, rolling your shoulders forwards several times.

After the flight

 

If you have travelled by air you should be alert for the symptoms of DVT for up to one month after flying, and should seek medical help if any symptoms such as a swollen or painful leg, especially the calf, and/or breathing difficulties occur.

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Hey, good to know your alright. Never knew DVT even existed until I read this post! You're a real lucky guy. Hope you get well soon.

You better check yourself before you wreck yourself!

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You were Lucky Lisbon... Thanks for giving us the awareness of DVT... You should get your blood checked every two/Three months to make sure .. Hope you will recover ASAP.... If you are going to Thailand next time, make sure your health is good before the flight.. Last March, I had bleeding Ulcer in my stomach, and was going to Thailand in April, My Doctor warned me that i wont be covered by the insurance if i get Ulcers again in Thailand because I had record of that illness few weeks previously... But i went ahead against Doctor orders , but end up sick in Guesthouse for 5 days in bed with existing Illness.. Was lucky that i was not needed at hospital when the Tablets(from Ireland) had worked... Back in Ireland in May, Was in Hospital again in October with the same illness, got four bag of blood transfusion.. So i have to watch my health for the first three months to travel to be eligible for insurance if get same illness in Thailand thereafter... Best of luck on your health

Thanks for your wishes mate, I hope to be out of the hospital tomorrow and then a slow road to a fully recovery, I hope?

So, how are you now, have you made a full recovery?

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Hey, good to know your alright. Never knew DVT even existed until I read this post! You're a real lucky guy. Hope you get well soon.

Thanks for your wishes mate, fingered crossed I hope to be back in Patts soon.

Regards,

Lisbon

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Thanks for your wishes mate, I hope to be out of the hospital tomorrow and then a slow road to a fully recovery, I hope?

So, how are you now, have you made a full recovery?

 

Made a good recovery, Waiting for a check up with Endoscopy.. Supposed to be two weeks ago but still on the waiting list.. Probablyad to go to my GP to give em a reminder that i,m due for endoscopy... Thanks for your thought...Take easy when you get home.

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Lisbon

 

I appreciate what you went through and feel your pain brother!

I have been unlucky enough to have had 2 episodes of DVT, both in the left leg, one in the calf and one in the femoral atery. In one of these cases the clot broke up and I developed multiple clots in the lungs. Result...two weeks in hospital.

I guess everyone has heard that on long flights you need to get up and walk around or at least every couple of hours do the exercises that they show you on the pre-flight video. Drinking plenty of water also helps (and not only because you have to keep getting up to take a piss!!).

In my case the respiratory surgeon took some blood for genetic screening and it was discovered I have a genetic problem called factor 5 liedens. Basically it just means that my blood clots way faster than the normal person. I'm now on warfarin for the rest of my life and have a blood test every 3 months to check my clotting levels.

So, Lisbon, my advice would be to talk to your quack about maybe being tested for factor 5, if you do have it you need to know.

I hope all goes well for you....

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Glad to hear your ok lisbon.

Your post is a wake up call dvt is some thing i never thought about.

Hope your back in patts soon.

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thanks for posting, Lisbon. Good information and quite interesting how long it can take until it's realised. You've been damn lucky, mate.

All the best for a speedy recovery!

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thanks for posting must say i do take sleeping pills and im gone most of th flight might think again..

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Thanks for the post Lisbon..Warfarin can have side affects...I take Nattokinase a natural supplement from the Japonese Natto.

 

Basically it helps to stop blood clots and can be used to break them up by attacking fibrogen,the clotting agent, in the blood.

 

There is a lot of info about nattokinase on the web.My buddy who had dvt leading to a pulmonary embolism is using it instead of Warferin and I take every day to

 

keep healthy.

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