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blue1878

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I've been thinking about starting this thread for a long time. Everton are a very famous and old club. I watched my first game back in 1971. My first season has a regular was 1973/74 Season. And I've been a season ticket holder since 1976/77 season. In 1986/87 I watched all 42 home and away league match's. I am thinking of going to live in Pattaya when I retire from work. If I did go and live in Pattaya I would really miss going to Goodison Park and watching the mighty blues. There's something special about going to Goodison Park. It's a famous old stadium that can generate a fantastic atmosphere. During my time watching Everton I've been lucky to see Everton win two league championships, reach 6 FA Cup Finals reach 2 league cup finals and 1 European final.

I've also seen Everton almost get relagated from the top division and that was nerve racking. I hope never to go through that again

Goodison Park.jpg

The famous Goodison Park
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R.I.P to the Everton supporter who died at today's game, suspected heart attack.   YNWA   http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/man-dies-goodison-park-after-11810115

I'm an Evertonian As bitter as the nextBut for one day each yearI give that a rest. Remember 96 brothers and sisters Who never came home Nil Satis Nisi Optimum You’ll Never Walk Alone

Hi Jocky King last night I watched the game again on MOTD2 and I still think the goal should have been allowed.  The United goalie had a clear view of the shot from our attacker.  The shot beat him be

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My first ever match

My Grandad took me to my first ever match on Saturday 20th November 1971. I was 13 years old and it was a very cold day. In fact it was freezing and as I was sitting in the stand before the match started I was thinking it was going to be a long afternoon because of the cold weather but how wrong was I because Everton ran out 8 nil winners against Southampton. I didn't want the match to end. Jor Royle scored 4, David Johnson scored 3 and Alan Ball scored 1.

Jor Royle.jpg David johnson.jpg alan ball 2.jpg

At the end of the match I was completely sold on Everton and couldn't wait to be taken to another game. Besides the score there was something special about being inside Goodison Park. The crowd, the atmosphere and the smell of the ground.

If I remember correctly there was only a small band of traveling Southampton fans at the match. And I felt sorry for them having to make the long journey back home after seeing there team trounced 8 - 0

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Goodison Park

Goodison Park has been Everton's home ground since 1892. And has hosted more top flight games than any other stadium in England.

Goodison Park.jpg early image of Goodison Park.jpg early image of Goodison Park 2.jpg

I have watched many great games at Goodison Park. And at these great games the atmosphere that the ground creates is something very very special. The ground might now be old but it's one of the great old stadiums of England and I love the place. I now have a season ticket for the Park End which is behind one of the goals. My first ever Season Ticket back in 1976/77 was for the Gwladys Street End which is behind the goal at the other end.

Gwladys Street.jpg

A famous ladies football match was played at Goodison park on the 26th December 1920. It was played between Dick,Kerrs ladies and St Helens ladies. The match attracted 53,000 spectators. At a time when Goodison Park's average gate for a league game was 29000. Shortly after the match the Football association banned ladies football because it was perceived by some that the women's teams were a threat to the men's game. The ban was lifted in 1970.

gwladys street 2.htm

Edited by blue1878
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Did you know

Today Manchester City won the FA Cup.

Well did you know that Everton have lost more FA Cup finals than anybody else. Everton have played in 13 cup finals. They've won 5 and lost 8. No other teams have lost that many finals

I've seen Everton play in 6 cup finals. Winning 2 and losing 4

The first time I saw Everton win the cup was in 1984

1984 cup winners.jpg

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I remember when they told Robbie Fowler he was never good enough to play football. Arf arf arf

Edited by kopite
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i remember watching the 1984 final at home with my uncle, i was 9 years old, have been an everton fan since i was old enough to understand what football was. why everton?? i have no idea and can't remember why i made that decision. it is a strange decision as i live in somerset so i guess the closest team to me would be bristol or southampton. however most of my friends are either manc or liverpool supporters so i guess i'm not he only one that supports teams further afield.

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Must say I have a soft spot for the Toffees. Stayed in Fazakerley with a bunch of them and they really were some of the nicest people I have ever met. Still look out for their results and am happy when they win.

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Been to goodison park a few times always a cracking atmosphere there never seen my team win there though I'm a Newcastle fan always get turned over when I've been

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Been to goodison park a few times always a cracking atmosphere there never seen my team win there though I'm a Newcastle fan always get turned over when I've been

 

When I was younger I not only went to the home games but I also went to the away games as well. I followed Everton all around the country. And I visited Newcastle many times. In fact I sometimes stayed in Newcastle for the weekend. Me and my mates would watch the match on the Saturday afternoon and would visit the city centre pubs on the Friday and Saturday nights. I used to stay in a B & B hotel in the jesmond area of Newcastle. Newcastle had a great nightlife.

I remember one year Everton played at Newcastle on the Saturday and played Hearts in Edinburgh in a testimonial match on the Sunday. So on the Friday we traveled to Newcastle and had a night out in Newcastle. On the Saturday we watched the Newcastle V Everton match which ended in a 1 - 1 draw. Straight after the match we traveled to Edinburgh and had a night out in Edinburgh. On the Sunday we watched the testimonial which also ended 1 - 1. And then traveled home and we managed to get home before last orders in our local pub

Edited by blue1878
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For me Everton is a very special club. Winning trophy's is great for a club and it's fans but it's not everything. Everton do a lot of work in the community. And are widely regarded as one of the best clubs in the world for working in the community. And "Everton in the Community" has now been a registered charitable company since 2004. And earlier this year the charity won yet another award.

 

Everton’s official charity has won a top award at the ‘sporting Oscars’.

 

Everton in the Community’s disability programme scooped the Best Community Programme category at the 2011 Sport Industry Awards at London’s Battersea Evolution on Wednesday evening, beating Adidas, Manchester City, the Football Foundation, Premiership Rugby and the Cricket Foundation to the accolade.

 

The Sports Industry Awards, which this year celebrates its tenth anniversary, are attended by the glitterati of the European sporting world and recognise the best sport has to offer across a number of areas including marketing, PR, new media, advertising and community.

 

Among those present on Wednesday evening were Ricky Hatton, Alan Shearer, James Cracknell, Amir Khan and David Seaman.

 

The judging panel, which included the BBC’s John Inverdale, paralympian Dame Tanni Grey-Thompson and Alistair Campbell, former chief press secretary to the Prime Minister, said Everton's scheme was 'single minded, highly impactful, and addressed an important social issue.'

 

The award was collected from Olympic gold medallist Denise Lewis and World Cup winner Geoff Hurst by Steve Johnson, who runs the disability programme and Steven Raynor, Everton in the Community's deputy CEO.

 

Everton in the Community’s disability programme is the largest and most respected in the world, delivering over 10,000 football opportunities for disabled children and adults every year.

 

Using the power of sport, the Blues’ official charity has engaged with over 17,000 disabled participants and 2,850 in the past year alone on a local, national and international level. There are currently 26 successful disability teams representing Everton, which field a total of eight international players.

 

The dynamic and innovative programme has also achieved the FA Community Club Charter Standard Award, and is being used as a benchmark for other clubs across the country.

 

Denise Barrett-Baxendale, Chief Executive Officer of Everton in the Community, said: “We are so proud and thrilled to have won the Best Community Programme award for our fantastic disability programme. Not only does the scheme allow disabled people who wouldn’t normally get the chance to play football, but it gives them the opportunity to make new friends, build self esteem and most importantly have lots of fun!”

 

“This is the second time we have won this category, which demonstrates the exceptional work Everton in the Community coaches deliver week in week out. On behalf of everyone at Everton I would like to express our gratitude for this award.”

 

This is the second consecutive year the Blues’ charity has taken home the top award for this category at Europe’s most prestigious sports awards. Last year Everton’s innovative Imagine Your Goals mental health programme came out on top after beating off still competition from Real Madrid and Manchester United.

 

 

It's stuff lie this that makes me proud to be an Evertonian

 

 

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Must say I have a soft spot for the Toffees. Stayed in Fazakerley with a bunch of them and they really were some of the nicest people I have ever met. Still look out for their results and am happy when they win.

 

 

AC in my younger days I used to travel down to London to watch a lot of Everton's away games. One of the grounds I used to enjoy visiting was Highbury. The coach I traveled down to London on always got to Highbury early. And the raod where the away coaches parked had a pub. And I always used to enjoy going to that pub for a few beers before the game. I just wish that I could remember the name of the pub.

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AC in my younger days I used to travel down to London to watch a lot of Everton's away games. One of the grounds I used to enjoy visiting was Highbury. The coach I traveled down to London on always got to Highbury early. And the raod where the away coaches parked had a pub. And I always used to enjoy going to that pub for a few beers before the game. I just wish that I could remember the name of the pub.

 

Good to hear you have happy memories of visiting the Gunners mate..If ever you are in London again, be sure to let me know first :Chokdee:

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Good to hear you have happy memories of visiting the Gunners mate..If ever you are in London again, be sure to let me know first :Chokdee:

 

 

If I do travel down to London I will get in Touch with you. It'll be great to talk about Pattaya and football over a few pints :Chokdee:

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AC in my younger days I used to travel down to London to watch a lot of Everton's away games. One of the grounds I used to enjoy visiting was Highbury. The coach I traveled down to London on always got to Highbury early. And the raod where the away coaches parked had a pub. And I always used to enjoy going to that pub for a few beers before the game. I just wish that I could remember the name of the pub.

 

Drayton Arms?

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Drayton Arms?

 

It could be but my memory is so bad that I just cannot remember

 

I know that I used to enjoy going in the pub before the game and having a beer or two

 

I never had any problems when I traveled to London to watch Everton play Arsenal. Which is how it should be

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I remember when they told Robbie Fowler he was never good enough to play football. Arf arf arf

 

I was there in '86. Not too impressed at half time but it got better!

 

Travelled back on the coach with Evertonians after the game, couldn't do that with the manks!

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Everton Versus Chelsea

Tomorrow I'm looking forward to watching the Everton toffee's take on the Chelsea pensioners. In what will be the last game league game of the season. As usual I'll be there and will be sitting in my seat in the park end. I'm really looking forward to the game and hopefully it'll be a good one.

toffee lady.jpg

toffee lady 2.jpg

chelsea pensioners.jpg

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Everton 1 Chelsea 0

At 5:55 this afternoon I was proud to be an Evertonian. The 10 men of Everton beat the 12 men of Chelsea

biggrin.gif. The ref did his best to help Chelsea but even when we went down to 10 men we were still to good for Chelsea. At Everton the players have got a great team spirit. And even we went down to 10 men the 10 men were to good for chelsea. After the match the Everton players did a lap of honour and were given a standing ovation. The match was entertaining, the ref was poor and now I have to wait until August before I can see my beloved Everton again

everton v chelsea.jpg

And the game was won by a great individual goal by Beckford. It's well worth watching the highlights of the match on tv just to see Beckford's goal.

And Chelsea's ladyboy got a lot of stick today

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Duncan Ferguson - Everton Legend

 

I've been watching Everton a long time and sen many great players pull on an Everton shirt. And one of my favourite players is the mighty Duncan Furguson. The Everton fans loved him because during his two spells with the club he would give everything. And he loved the club and fans. Duncan suffered with injuries and suspensions. If he could have kept clear of both of these he could have gone on to be a top premiership player. I once went to Old Trafford and saw him score two great goals against United. Duncan was so good that defenders didnt like playing against him. It's also a shame he played in an ordinary Everton side because with better players around him he would have scored a lot more goals.

I always remember a funny story about Duncan. Two burglars broke into his house one night. And Duncan was asleep upstairs. He took on both of them. One ended up in hospital and both went to jail

 

duncan ferguson 2.jpg duncan ferguson 3.jpg duncan ferguson 4.jpg

 

duncan ferguson 5.jpg duncan ferguson 6.jpg duncan ferguson 7.jpg

 

duncan ferguson 8.jpg

Edited by blue1878
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Sam Chedzoy - Everton legend

Not many people will have heard of Sam Chedzoy but he is an Everton legend from the early part of the last century. And he came from my home town of Ellesmere Port. Here is a tribute from Ellesmere Port's local paper "The Pioneer"

Football: Remembering an Ellesmere Port football legend - Everton’s Sam Chedgzoy

Jan 6 2010 by Alec Doyle, Ellesmere Port Pioneer

 

12892771.jpegTOMORROW marks 43 years since the death of an Ellesmere Port footballer who became one of the most influential players in the history of the game – but many readers will probably never have heard of him.

 

Sam Chedgzoy (pronounced Chedzoy), was born in the Port on January 27, 1889 and became one of the most distinguished players ever to don the blue shirt of Everton, surviving the First World War to play until he was 50.

 

But it was his actions in the 1924-25 season, towards the end of his Everton career, which singled him out.

 

That summer the FA had re-worded the RULES to allow players to score directly from a corner kick.

 

Liverpool Echo sports editor Ernest Edwards spotted a loophole, however, and offered Chedgzoy £2 to dribble from the corner flag to score himself during a match against Tottenham Hotspur at White Hart Lane.

 

Never one to shirk a challenge, Chedgzoy agreed and duly scored.

 

When the referee lectured him, Chedgzoy successfully argued there was nothing in the RULES to stop him doing it and the goal was awarded.

 

The FA called an emergency meeting and decreed the corner-taker could only strike the ball once to close the loophole.

 

But Chedgzoy had already secured his place in football history.

 

He began his top flight football career at Goodison Park in 1910, aged 21 after signing from West Cheshire League side Burnell’s Ironworks where he played with Joe Mercer’s father.

 

He spent 12 seasons with the Blues, interrupted by four years during the First World War, predominantly as a right wing forward.

 

He won a Division One Championship medal with the club in 1914/15 – Everton’s second league title – and in total made 300 appearances (279 in the league) for the Toffees, scoring 36 goals.

 

He also won eight caps for England, his first against Wales aged 30, thanks to his pace and bewitching style and he represented the Football League on five occasions.

 

Like his more famous fellow Portite Joe Mercer, Chedgzoy learned his football in Ellesmere Port’s school of hard knocks.

 

And through a twist of fate one of Everton’s greatest providers only played one season with the club’s greatest goalscorer, Dixie Dean, as the goal machine signed from Tranmere Rovers during Chedgzoy’s final season with the Blues in 1925/6.

 

That was not the end of his career, however.

 

In 1922 he had holidayed in Canada and two years later during the close season in England he returned to manage the Grenadier Guards in Canada’s Interprovincial League.

 

When he left Everton aged 37 he was signed by the New Bedford Whalers in Massachusetts to play in the American Soccer League.

 

After four years he returned to Canada when he signed for Montreal Carsteel as a player-coach in the Canadian National Soccer League.

 

Chedgzoy took them to seven league play-off finals, losing the first four before winning the title in 1936, 1939 and 1940.

 

He made his final appearance as a player for Carsteel in the Canadian Club Final in 1939 at the age of 50.

 

Sam Chedgzoy died on January 7, 1967, aged 78, having enjoyed a most illustrious career and was one of the first players inducted into the Everton Giants list in 2000 having already been inducted into the Canadian Soccer Hall of Fame.

 

sam chedzoy.jpg sam chedzoy 2.jpg

 

 

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Good to see some fellow Evertonians on the board.

 

I started following Everton as a yound lad in their glory days in the 80s. One of my earliest footballing memories is of the 86 Cup Final which we lost to the redpox after the great start and Lineker goal. They havent been particularly successful over teh last coupe of decades but I do think they're a bit of a special club with a real community feel which is missing with most big clubs now.

 

I unfortunately only to get to Goodison once or twice each season but love the atmorsphere and the old ground. I've been to see Everton at the Emirates and a few other grounds and the new stadiums just dont have the same atmosphere.

 

Here's hoping for a good season in 2011/2012 - COYB!

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Sam Chedzoy - Everton legend

Not many people will have heard of Sam Chedzoy but he is an Everton legend from the early part of the last century. And he came from my home town of Ellesmere Port. Here is a tribute from Ellesmere Port's local paper "The Pioneer"

Football: Remembering an Ellesmere Port football legend - Everton’s Sam Chedgzoy

Jan 6 2010 by Alec Doyle, Ellesmere Port Pioneer

 

12892771.jpegTOMORROW marks 43 years since the death of an Ellesmere Port footballer who became one of the most influential players in the history of the game – but many readers will probably never have heard of him.

 

Sam Chedgzoy (pronounced Chedzoy), was born in the Port on January 27, 1889 and became one of the most distinguished players ever to don the blue shirt of Everton, surviving the First World War to play until he was 50.

 

But it was his actions in the 1924-25 season, towards the end of his Everton career, which singled him out.

 

That summer the FA had re-worded the rules to allow players to score directly from a corner kick.

 

Liverpool Echo sports editor Ernest Edwards spotted a loophole, however, and offered Chedgzoy £2 to dribble from the corner flag to score himself during a match against Tottenham Hotspur at White Hart Lane.

 

Never one to shirk a challenge, Chedgzoy agreed and duly scored.

 

When the referee lectured him, Chedgzoy successfully argued there was nothing in the rules to stop him doing it and the goal was awarded.

 

The FA called an emergency meeting and decreed the corner-taker could only strike the ball once to close the loophole.

 

But Chedgzoy had already secured his place in football history.

 

He began his top flight football career at Goodison Park in 1910, aged 21 after signing from West Cheshire League side Burnell’s Ironworks where he played with Joe Mercer’s father.

 

He spent 12 seasons with the Blues, interrupted by four years during the First World War, predominantly as a right wing forward.

 

He won a Division One Championship medal with the club in 1914/15 – Everton’s second league title – and in total made 300 appearances (279 in the league) for the Toffees, scoring 36 goals.

 

He also won eight caps for England, his first against Wales aged 30, thanks to his pace and bewitching style and he represented the Football League on five occasions.

 

Like his more famous fellow Portite Joe Mercer, Chedgzoy learned his football in Ellesmere Port’s school of hard knocks.

 

And through a twist of fate one of Everton’s greatest providers only played one season with the club’s greatest goalscorer, Dixie Dean, as the goal machine signed from Tranmere Rovers during Chedgzoy’s final season with the Blues in 1925/6.

 

That was not the end of his career, however.

 

In 1922 he had holidayed in Canada and two years later during the close season in England he returned to manage the Grenadier Guards in Canada’s Interprovincial League.

 

When he left Everton aged 37 he was signed by the New Bedford Whalers in Massachusetts to play in the American Soccer League.

 

After four years he returned to Canada when he signed for Montreal Carsteel as a player-coach in the Canadian National Soccer League.

 

Chedgzoy took them to seven league play-off finals, losing the first four before winning the title in 1936, 1939 and 1940.

 

He made his final appearance as a player for Carsteel in the Canadian Club Final in 1939 at the age of 50.

 

Sam Chedgzoy died on January 7, 1967, aged 78, having enjoyed a most illustrious career and was one of the first players inducted into the Everton Giants list in 2000 having already been inducted into the Canadian Soccer Hall of Fame.

 

post-15515-0-98739700-1306432045.jpg post-15515-0-28131400-1306432065.jpg

 

 

 

Great article on Sam Chedzoy - I'd never heard of him before but he sounds like an absolute legend.

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Good to see some fellow Evertonians on the board.

 

I started following Everton as a yound lad in their glory days in the 80s. One of my earliest footballing memories is of the 86 Cup Final which we lost to the redpox after the great start and Lineker goal. They havent been particularly successful over teh last coupe of decades but I do think they're a bit of a special club with a real community feel which is missing with most big clubs now.

 

I unfortunately only to get to Goodison once or twice each season but love the atmorsphere and the old ground. I've been to see Everton at the Emirates and a few other grounds and the new stadiums just dont have the same atmosphere.

 

Here's hoping for a good season in 2011/2012 - COYB!

 

 

I agree with you Goodison Park creates a very special atmosphere. And I love going there on match days. I don't want to move from Goodison Park but I think we may have to so if a new stadium is built I hope the new stadia is built with some character.

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I couldn't give a flying ferret about the Premier League these days: too many foreign players, prima donnas and WAGS etc.

 

But Everton do seem to be one of the few clubs that's retained links with the local community rather than the financial community. Illustrated no more poignantly than the tribute paid to Rhys Jones at his murder site and at Goodison Park in 2007. Sad, but very moving - were you there Mr Blue?

 

 

 

(second one is poor quality, but ..... )

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I couldn't give a flying ferret about the Premier League these days: too many foreign players, prima donnas and WAGS etc.

 

But Everton do seem to be one of the few clubs that's retained links with the local community rather than the financial community. Illustrated no more poignantly than the tribute paid to Rhys Jones at his murder site and at Goodison Park in 2007. Sad, but very moving - were you there Mr Blue?

 

 

 

(second one is poor quality, but ..... )

 

 

kansuwan I was there at Goodison Park. It was very emotional.

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