Jump to content
IGNORED

Writing Thai...


El Cata
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have only been teaching myself to read / write Thai for a few weeks. I like to problem solve myself, it's more fun that way, but I've come up against a couple of insurmountable stumbling blocks.

 

 

The first 'sala' we learn & the most confusing. Several resources state that this makes an 'a' sound such as in 'bat'. Others insist that it is pronounced as 'u' as is 'gut'. Which is correct?

 

Also, what are the rules governing ะ & it's bastard twin 'mai-hun-aagaat'?

 

 

Along the same lines as above, is it initially pronounced 'g' or 'k'? Apparently Thais pronounce Krabi (as in the island) as 'grabby'.

 

While I'm here, I have another question about 'gor gai'.

 

ก็ = gor = also, too.

 

This uses the special symbol 'mai taiku', which shortens the vowel attached to the initial consonant. Where is the vowel? How can you shorten the vowel in 'g'?

 

One last one; I promise. There are a plethora of rules governing tones (consonant, dead silly ball etc). Do you think it would be a good idea to bypass these rules? I can't imagine Thais applying these rules 'on the fly' when reading. Perhaps they identify the letters / word, identify the context, then voice the word as they have previously heard it.

 

Here are some of my wall charts, which people might find useful.

 

Learning Thai.doc

 

Page 1: Consonants. Lower class (blue), mid class (green), high class (red).

Page 2: Vowels. Sorry, no phonetics.

Page 3: Tone marks. Tone rules.

Page 4: Tone rules.

 

I will be updating this as I go along, if anyone wants a copy.

 

Peace. :GoldenSmile1:

Edited by El Cata
sgu_banner.gif
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have only been teaching myself to read / write Thai for a few weeks. I like to problem solve myself, it's more fun that way, but I've come up against a couple of insurmountable stumbling blocks.

 

 

The first 'sala' we learn & the most confusing. Several resources state that this makes an 'a' sound such as in 'bat'. Others insist that it is pronounced as 'u' as is 'gut'. Which is correct?

 

Also, what are the rules governing ะ & it's bastard twin 'mai-hun-aagaat'?

 

 

The sound it makes is like the 'a' in what, or the 'u' in gut. Definitely not like the 'a' in bat.

 

The comes at the end of a syllable, the Mai Han Agaat comes in the middle of a syllable. So จะ 'ja' is written with and กลับ 'glap' is written with a

 

 

Along the same lines as above, is it initially pronounced 'g' or 'k'? Apparently Thais pronounce Krabi (as in the island) as 'grabby'.

 

In most languagebooks they say it's pronounced as a 'g', but actually it's an unaspirated 'k'. The problem for native English speakers is that that sound doesn't exist as an initial sound in English.

However, the sound does exist in words like 'skate'. If you keep your hand in front of your mouth and compare saying 'Kate' and 'skate', you'll notice that with 'Kate' you feel a puff of air against your hand (=aspirated), and with 'skate' you don't (=unaspirated). That 'k' is exactly the Thai you're looking for!

 

While I'm here, I have another question about 'gor gai'.

 

ก็ = gor = also, too.

 

This uses the special symbol 'mai taiku', which shortens the vowel attached to the initial consonant. Where is the vowel? How can you shorten the vowel in 'g'?

 

You're right, normally you cannot. This is an exception.

 

One last one; I promise. There are a plethora of rules governing tones (consonant, dead silly ball etc). Do you think it would be a good idea to bypass these rules? I can't imagine Thais applying these rules 'on the fly' when reading. Perhaps they identify the letters / word, identify the context, then voice the word as they have previously heard it.

 

Well, you're right about how Thais do it. But they could already speak the language fluently before they went to school and learned how to read and write. And even then they had to go through a lot of drilling at school.

You ask pretty good questions though for someone who just started learning how to read, so my guess is learning the tone rules shouldn't be that difficult for you. After some time you should be able to read 'on the fly' more and more, same as Thais.

 

 

สู้ ๆ !

ขออภัยในความไม่สะดวก กูเกิลทรานสเลทไม่สามารถแปลข้อมูลนี้ได้ 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

One last one; I promise. There are a plethora of rules governing tones (consonant, dead silly ball etc). Do you think it would be a good idea to bypass these rules? I can't imagine Thais applying these rules 'on the fly' when reading. Perhaps they identify the letters / word, identify the context, then voice the word as they have previously heard it.

 

I had the exact same notion when I started to understand the tones rules when reading, "how the hell can anyone read at speed and calculate what each tone is each and every single time". I found most thai's aren't really aware of the tones the same way we are, they just learnt to speak the words first and grew up with an 'ear' for it. After a while it kinda clicks and when you see certain word cluster you kinda just know and also if you pay attention when people are speaking you'll get a better ear for the differences and say things correctly without thinking.

 

Everyone has a different take but I wouldn't stress on the tones too much at this point, especially the ones without tone marks because that takes a while to really get.

Edited by herds
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had the exact same notion when I started to understand the tones rules when reading, "how the hell can anyone read at speed and calculate what each tone is each and every single time". I found most thai's aren't really aware of the tones the same way we are, they just learnt to speak the words first and grew up with an 'ear' for it. After a while it kinda clicks and when you see certain word cluster you kinda just know and also if you pay attention when people are speaking you'll get a better ear for the differences and say things correctly without thinking.

 

Everyone has a different take but I wouldn't stress on the tones too much at this point, especially the ones without tone marks because that takes a while to really get.

 

This is good advice. Better to get your reading up to speed and then add in the tones later. Even after you have the tones, it's always better to mimic a native speaker anyway - until your accent is really good.

 

As herd's says, they just recognize the words. e.g., ใช้ (chaiH) is to use and the word ใช่ (chaiF) is yes and I would bet most wouldn't even be able to tell you the tone - although they can say it perfectly. Whereas knuckleheads like me often have the opposite problem - especially when drinking to excess.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The sound it makes is like the 'a' in what, or the 'u' in gut. Definitely not like the 'a' in bat.

Now I'm really confused. In my accent, the 'a' in 'what' sounds like the 'o' in 'hot'.

 

In most languagebooks they say it's pronounced as a 'g', but actually it's an unaspirated 'k'. The problem for native English speakers is that that sound doesn't exist as an initial sound in English.

However, the sound does exist in words like 'skate'. If you keep your hand in front of your mouth and compare saying 'Kate' and 'skate', you'll notice that with 'Kate' you feel a puff of air against your hand (=aspirated), and with 'skate' you don't (=unaspirated). That 'k' is exactly the Thai you're looking for!

Thanks, I got this one! I've had a lot of exposure to the language, especially the word 'krap'. I must have been unconciously pronouncing it correctly, because when I say it whilst checking for aspiration, in can hear both a 'g' & a 'k' in there.

 

สู้ ๆ !

I see you've left me a little teaser here. Hmmm.

 

Peace. :GoldenSmile1:

sgu_banner.gif
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now I'm really confused. In my accent, the 'a' in 'what' sounds like the 'o' in 'hot'.

 

 

LOL, yeah, that's the big problem with transliteration: everyone has their own idea of what it should sound like.

 

Best thing to do is to listen (and look) how Thais pronounce it and try to copy that.

And if you don't have one around, you could look up the word at a site like www.thai-language.com for instance, where they have soundclips of most of the words in their dictionary (well, I'm sure you already knew that).

 

If you're looking for some more detailed info, this site: slice-of-thai.com is the best I've seen. Complete with soundclips, graphics, etc., they go over all the different sounds in Thai, explaining all the pitfalls for us farang in great detail.

It's better than any explanation I've ever seen in a language book, and it certainly answered all the questions I had about Thai pronunciation.

ขออภัยในความไม่สะดวก กูเกิลทรานสเลทไม่สามารถแปลข้อมูลนี้ได้ 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you want to learn writing that language then you want to try to learn that language and then you can use language translation services and through that services you can get many benefit form them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you want to learn writing that language then you want to try to learn that language and then you can use language translation services and through that services you can get many benefit form them.

F*ck that.

 

I've had 17 weeks exposure (during 5 trips) to the Thai language in 18 months, talked to my girlfriend for 4 hours a day & studied hard to speak language during that that time.

 

There's no way I'd pay anyone, with my experience, knowledge & the free resources out there. :Think1:

 

Peace. :GoldenSmile1:

sgu_banner.gif
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem with writing Thai is that apart from the common words, unless you have seen the word and how its written its very difficult to know you are spelling it correctly.

 

I can write but I don't really do it that often and am hoping that the amount of reading I do will just burn words and how they are spelt into my memory so if I do have to write something its not going to be difficult.

My understanding of women goes only as far as the pleasures.

-- Michael Caine (Alfie, 1966)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reading and listening is passive learning, speaking and writing is active learning.

While passive learning is good, active learning is what really sinks it in for me.

 

I could already read pretty good, but when Apple enabled Thai script on the iPhone last year and I started writing texts to Thai friends, that's when I felt I was really making progress.

At first even simple words that I've read at least a 1000 times like you and I were hard to spell: is it ขุน, คุน or คุณ and ผม or พม?

If you just read it you'll know, but if you have to write it then you really have to think about it and it sinks in a lot faster. Well, for me anyway....

ขออภัยในความไม่สะดวก กูเกิลทรานสเลทไม่สามารถแปลข้อมูลนี้ได้ 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...everyone learns differently. I did "boot camp"at Thai-Whalen near Carrefour and recommend it. Doesn't mean ti will fly with you.

 

I get ahold of a Thai book...any book and write the whole damn thing out from beginning to end.

You bet I get better!

 

Buy Thai coloring books and pratice writing and/or typing passah Thai daily. If you fuck up, so what?

Keep it fun and you will keep doing it.

One day---without warning---you will be with Thais and sudddenly grok wtf all are saying. It is almost better than a wank.

 

Juist keep at it and go lightly on yourself. Always have a notebook at your side to write stuff down.

Memorize menus.

I have had 3-4 Thai tutors at any one time, works for me.

 

My best was this old Thai guy, Pi Cham, great human being. He picks up where you are at and off you go....

PM me if you need or want his contact info....

ALL girls like it in the Ass. Not all know it....yet!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...everyone learns differently. I did "boot camp"at Thai-Whalen near Carrefour and recommend it. Doesn't mean ti will fly with you.

 

I get ahold of a Thai book...any book and write the whole damn thing out from beginning to end.

You bet I get better!

 

Buy Thai coloring books and pratice writing and/or typing passah Thai daily. If you fuck up, so what?

Keep it fun and you will keep doing it.

One day---without warning---you will be with Thais and sudddenly grok wtf all are saying. It is almost better than a wank.

 

Juist keep at it and go lightly on yourself. Always have a notebook at your side to write stuff down.

Memorize menus.

I have had 3-4 Thai tutors at any one time, works for me.

 

My best was this old Thai guy, Pi Cham, great human being. He picks up where you are at and off you go....

PM me if you need or want his contact info....

 

This is excellent advice. The one problem I have is I can't write thai by hand - only with my iphone or computer and it is sometimes handy to do it by hand.

 

I would also like Cham's number, but your mailbox seems to be full :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share



  • COVID-19

    Any posts or topics which the moderation team deems to be rumours/speculatiom, conspiracy theory, scaremongering, deliberately misleading or has been posted to deliberately distort information will be removed - as will BMs repeatedly doing so. Existing rules also apply.

  • Advertise on Pattaya Addicts
  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Our picks

    • For those that don't know, I did Friday meetings before many years ago,  I feel like we are missing a regular meeting for members,  I am aware guys meet at PA affiliated bars. But I want to start meeting people again, I'm inviting the guys following my YouTube also.

      The meetings is a chance to get to meet each other,  I plan to be at every meeting, I also have Dean from Dive bar that has offered to help out with a crawl after.
      The meetings will be  Monday  6 pm - 8 pm each week.  (The improvised bar crawl will commence at 8 p.m.  Dean will make his own plans for that.)

      Due to low numbers of people in town, I will start the meetings in our bars to help our girls and managers, please check back often incase things are changed.  I will be sharing the love around town later, but Soi 6 is first on my list (including bars that are friendly competition)   
      If bar owners want us to have a meeting at their bar,  they need to have a minimum of 10 girls.  I'm not dragging people to empty bars for favours.
      Please help us invite other members, it takes a while to get momentum.
      Monday 6 pm - 8pm  (then bar crawl after)
      21st March - Playpen Soi 6
      28th March - Night wish bar Soi 6
      4th April - Toy Box bar Soi 6
      11th April - Repent Soi 6
      18th April - where angels play Soi 6
      25th April -  (next bar we have open)

      2nd May - (next bar we have open)
      9th May - Cooters bar soi 6 
      16th May - Hot shots bar Soi 6
      23rd May - (next bar we have open)
      30th of May - Lust soi 6 
      6th of June - Illuzion
      13th of June - (next bar we have open)

      I look forward to meeting people again.
      • 66 replies
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.