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Ru4Real

So why do I just want to get the fuck out of dodge?

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Ru4Real

Too long to read - Australia is one hell of a country compared to other OECD countries.


Australia performs very well in many measures of well-being relative to most other countries in the Better Life Index. Australia ranks at the top in civic engagement and above the average in income and wealth, environmental quality, health status, housing, jobs and earnings, education and skills, subjective well-being, social connections and personal security. It is below average in work-life balance. These rankings are based on available selected data.

Money, while it cannot buy happiness, is an important means to achieving higher living standards. In Australia, the average household net-adjusted disposable income per capita is USD 32 759 a year, less than the OECD average of USD 33 604 a year. But there is a considerable gap between the richest and poorest – the top 20% of the population earn nearly six times as much as the bottom 20%.

In terms of employment, around 73% of people aged 15 to 64 in Australia have a paid job, above the OECD employment average of 68%. Some 78% of men are in paid work, compared with 68% of women. In Australia, 13% of employees work very long hours, above the OECD average of 11%, with 19% of men working very long hours compared with just 6% of women.

Good education and skills are important requisites for finding a job. In Australia, 81% of adults aged 25-64 have completed upper secondary education, higher than the OECD average of 78%. This is truer of men than women, as 82% of men have successfully completed high-school compared with 80% of women. In terms of the quality of its educational system, the average student scored 502 in reading literacy, maths and science in the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). This score is higher than the OECD average of 486. On average in Australia, girls outperformed boys by 8 points, above the average OECD gap of 2 points.

In terms of health, life expectancy at birth in Australia is around 83 years, three years higher than the OECD average of 80 years. Life expectancy for women is 85 years, compared with 80 for men. The level of atmospheric PM2.5 – tiny air pollutant particles small enough to enter and cause damage to the lungs – is 5.2 micrograms per cubic meter, the lowest rate in the OECD where the average is 13.9 micrograms per cubic meter. Australia also does well in terms of water quality, as 93% of people say they are satisfied with the quality of their water, higher than the OECD average of 81%.

Concerning the public sphere, there is a strong sense of community and high levels of civic participation in Australia, where 95% of people believe that they know someone they could rely on in time of need, more than the OECD average of 89%. Voter turnout, a measure of citizens' participation in the political process, was 91% during recent elections. This figure is one of the highest in the OECD, where the average is 68% and reflects the  practice of compulsory voting in Australia. Voter turnout for the top 20% of the population is an estimated 95% and for the bottom 20% it is an estimated 89%, a much narrower difference than the OECD average gap of 13 percentage points.

In general, Australians are more satisfied with their lives than the OECD average. When asked to rate their general satisfaction with life on a scale from 0 to 10, Australians gave it a 7.3 grade on averagehigher than the OECD average of 6.5.

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keepitfun

Quite happy with my country.  I don’t think I will leave except for extended or regular holidays.

A few things are starting to give me the irrits but they are people rather than country / infrastructure related.

weak sentencing....do the crime, harsh penalties and if you’re a dual citizen of somewhere else...get out.

bleeding hearts....jumping on bandwagons and protesting but making no difference.  Get a job.

Culture...no, you’re not in your country of origin any more.  By all means keep your culture but within the constraints of the Aussie way...don’t come here and bleat about stuff here or in your homeland that I’m supposed to give a damn about.

 

bout enough for a Sunday rant.  

 

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likeaking

OECD = ?

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Ru4Real

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is a unique forum where the governments of 34 democracies with market economies work with each other, as well as with more than 70 non-member economies to promote economic growth, prosperity, and sustainable development.

Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States

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LOTTELLEE WINNA

TBH, I have enjoyed just about anywhere I have lived.

I am from the UK and was privileged to live in Australia for  couple of years (2011-2014). Subsequently I moved to live in Pattaya and then Udon, both of which I enjoyed, but primarily from the perspective as a playground and a place to retire. Now I am NZ based, but work Auckland, Sydney & Singapore. Intend to move back to LoS in 24 months time. 

Australia is a truly wonderful country, I really enjoyed living in Sydney. I found it to be friendly and the pay was excellent. Sure accommodation is expensive, but the lifestyle is good. 

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Scuba+

I spent a few months in Australia, had a good time there but couldn't see myself living there. New Zealand was more me, funny that i ended up in Scotland for 10 years which is similar to New Zealand. I enjoy Thailand the best though. UK was good for making money

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timbota

If someone wants to get the fuck out of dodge, maybe they should stop looking at dodge and start looking at themselves. 

There are people that stay positive, thrive, & can be happy in a less than stellar environment.   There are people that are never happy no matter how good they have it.

Just saying.....

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Ru4Real

And there are those that ponder aloud (or in this case, online) without being a dick about it ... just saying.

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Dr No
3 hours ago, LOTTELLEE WINNA said:

Australia is a truly wonderful country, I really enjoyed living in Sydney. I found it to be friendly and the pay was excellent. Sure accommodation is expensive, but the lifestyle is good. 

I love living in Sydney, arguably the most beautiful harbour city in the world. Fantastic dining to be had, from cheap Asian food courts in Haymarket to 5 star experiences at Quay and the like. Dozens of clean beaches to be enjoyed, plenty of beautiful young women from all over the world to ogle :)

It was only a few days ago as I walked through the CBD that I noted to myself how diverse the city was, so many different languages being spoken by many different people. 

There’s a reason why millions of tourists visit and tens of thousands want to settle here every year. 

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Itson

Thanks guys for putting this in perspective , I have lived in Sydney all my life and now find it very dull/vanilla , all I can think about is the exciting times I can have in LOS , I have a great life incl family , work , housing , ect and this is all because of the opportunities this wonderful country has brought me , sometime I really need a wake up 

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Redr00ster

I suspect it's the bigger picture OP. Where we live only makes up a fraction of a contribution to our overall wellbeing. Family, friends, relationships, fun+recreation, work, rest+ relaxation, personal growth and contribution as well as sleep, exercise and diet are what's called the "life wheel" ....score each catargory out of 10 and see where you are at. 

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MunterHunter
3 hours ago, Scuba+ said:

I spent a few months in Australia, had a good time there but couldn't see myself living there. New Zealand was more me, funny that i ended up in Scotland for 10 years which is similar to New Zealand. I enjoy Thailand the best though. UK was good for making money

Where did you live in Scotland? Im sure you told me before

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Ru4Real
46 minutes ago, Redr00ster said:

I suspect it's the bigger picture OP. Where we live only makes up a fraction of a contribution to our overall wellbeing. Family, friends, relationships, fun+recreation, work, rest+ relaxation, personal growth and contribution as well as sleep, exercise and diet are what's called the "life wheel" ....score each catargory out of 10 and see where you are at. 

^ This; due to various things that have happened over the past few years and the fact all I seem to do here is work I'm in negative territory. As I said at the start:

12 hours ago, Ru4Real said:

Australia is one hell of a country compared to other OECD countries.

so I wasn't "home country bashing" per se as so many people do. Just in a bit of a rut and need to dig my way out of it. For the first half of my life I moved around a fair bit, couple of years here three there, but have now been in the same place for nearly 30 years (in fact in 2008, where I live now - city, not house - became the longest I'd lived in one place). Australia hasn't gone stale, I have; stumbling over the article I posted led me to ponder why I was feeling like this all things considered. Is it just itchy feet or something deeper.

Your post hit the nail on the head I think, so many thanks.

 

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Redrig

I live in a very quiet place in uk, not much to do socially but have had a small business here for 30 years which is so established that I would never want to pack it in, maybe because although I work hard 7 days a week it doesn’t feel like work and I can do what I want.

Los makes something nice to look forward to every 2 or 3 months but when away doesn’t take long to start missing work.

Maybe I’m ting tong lol

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Ru4Real
2 minutes ago, Redrig said:

Maybe I’m ting tong lol

No maybe about it 555

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Scuba+
Where did you live in Scotland? Im sure you told me before
Glasgow west end...not possilpark...

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taylor1975
1 hour ago, Redr00ster said:

I suspect it's the bigger picture OP. Where we live only makes up a fraction of a contribution to our overall wellbeing. Family, friends, relationships, fun+recreation, work, rest+ relaxation, personal growth and contribution as well as sleep, exercise and diet are what's called the "life wheel" ....score each catargory out of 10 and see where you are at. 

This makes sense, good info.

I would like to add, online battlefield 1 on xbox to that wheel :rolleyes:

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Redr00ster
18 minutes ago, taylor1975 said:

This makes sense, good info.

I would like to add, online battlefield 1 on xbox to that wheel :rolleyes:

Good man....you score highly on the "fun/recreation category :)

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Taa_Saparot
13 hours ago, keepitfun said:

Culture...no, you’re not in your country of origin any more.  By all means keep your culture but within the constraints of the Aussie way...don’t come here and bleat about stuff here or in your homeland that I’m supposed to give a damn about. 

Agreed .... Aboriginal Culture should be preserved.

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kash buc

Sorry way off topic.  I thought the saying “get the hell outta dodge”. was an American thing. They use it in Australia too??

as far as I know it originated from the old western TV show “Gunsmoke “

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boingo

From my perspective the most necessary thing in any society is aspiration to improve your lot in life to be available. Remove that and the society is in trouble. Australia is close to this point now.

Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk

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WalterA
15 hours ago, Ru4Real said:

n . Voter turnout, a measure of citizens' participation in the political process, was 91% during recent elections. This figure is one of the highest in the OECD, where the average is 68% and reflects the  practice of compulsory voting in Australia. Voter turnout for the top 20% of the population is an estimated 95% and for the bottom 20% it is an estimated 89%, a much narrower difference than the OECD average gap of 13 percentage points.

 

Voting is compulsory, hence the high turnout ... I think the fine is $200 for not turning up ....

We are the lucky country! In many respects Australia is if not the best country in the world, definitely one of the best, especially in regards to services and standard of living ....

THERE ARE ISSUES ....

Reckless immigration, feminism, political correctness has soured life in many respects ....

In a land which is mainly uninhabited, housing affordability is a big issue .... since politicians failed to brake overseas buyers from driving up prices .... many young Australians can’t afford a home now, in a mainly empty country ... ??

Australia has one of the highest suicide rates in the world ... especially in the country , in farming communities ...  harsh conditions, isolation etc ....

I could go on and on .... 

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Ru4Real
24 minutes ago, kash buc said:

as far as I know it originated from the old western TV show “Gunsmoke “

Indeed it did, and yes, I belive it's used throughout the English speaking world ... by those of a certain demographic that is 555

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Ru4Real
3 minutes ago, WalterA said:

I think the fine is $200 for not turning up

Is it that much now? Last time I got hit it was only $20, shit ... that'd be either '93 or '96. Time flies when you're having fun 555

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Ru4Real
49 minutes ago, boingo said:

From my perspective the most necessary thing in any society is aspiration to improve your lot in life to be available. Remove that and the society is in trouble. Australia is close to this point now.

Maybe, we've basically lost our manufacturing base and what's left of it is going to get hit hard with upcoming tech IMO. I think we have to quickly become the smart country rather than the "lucky country" for the next generations to have it as good as we've had.

I remember watching a doco years back about Korean ship building, same time people where on about selling out to slave wages overseas. The fact the Koreans where on an average of AU$70,000 kind of put that to rest for me. The way they built them was amazing (no dry dock,  build the shell, launch to see if it floats then then fit out - they built them in sections in huge warehouses so no issue with inclement weather, fully fitted out due to the advent of computers, wheeled the sections out and welded them together then launched)... we sell raw materials for peanuts and then buy them back value added at a premium. Pretty dumb IMO.

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