Jump to content

Support our Sponsors >> Thai Friendly | Pattaya News | Pattaya Unplugged | The Night Wish Group | Thailand 24/7 Forum | TPN Property | La La Land bar | NEW PA website | Subscribe to The Pattaya News | | Pattaya Investigations | ChicaCheck | Add your Text or Event here

IGNORED

Travel insurance & declaring pre-existing medical conditions


jaynewcastle

Recommended Posts

Something I've wondered about but never found the answer to. Different people have different opinions

 

If you don't declare a pre-existing medical condition, say for example asthma, does your entire travel insurance become invalid for any claim whatsoever, or would just claims relating to your undeclared pre-existing medical condition be denied ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes.

Insurance companies look at undeclared pre-existing conditions as a way to invalidate the policy - not just afflictions related to the pre-existing conditions. This is on the basis they might have denied it to begin with, that you are exposed to greater risks and are not paying for the risks, and on the basis they don't like to pay claims. You might get a policy that costs more or that denies asthma claims though then they say well the asthma is why you had the heart attack.

Declare and pay and get coverage that covers. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I contacted my travel insurance company in 2016 and tried to declare an unfortunate  and very much unwanted bout of testicular cancer.

Their response was that my insurance would still be valid and the premium would not increase, however I would not be covered for any complications arising from said illness (eg infected wound from operation or claims for any further treatment).

This was done by telephone and to my knowledge she didn’t even make a note of it on the computer. In any case, if anything serious went wrong I’d be on the first flight back to London (if at all possible).

 

Pattaya is like enjoying yourself -it's not for everyone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reminder to read carefully everything from these cunts,

this my last 12 months price

Thank you for purchasing Priceline Protects Travel Insurance, underwritten by Chubb Insurance Australia Limited (Chubb).

Your payment of $ 369.32 has been processed and your Priceline Protects Travel Insurance Policy is now effective.

Latest reminder

Policy is due to expire on 28/01/2019

Thank you again for purchasing Priceline Protects Travel Insurance policy underwritten by Chubb Insurance Australia Limited (Chubb).

We've now made it easier for you to renew your Priceline Protects Travel Insurance policy. Unless you tell us otherwise, your policy will automatically renew and we will charge your previously nominated Credit/Debit card for your new annual premium shown below:

New Annual Premium: $1,079.3

It will be a rather curt refusal

 

 

www.sugarcanemafia.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't speak for other countries, but in the UK I think you ought to treat it like car insurance. If you fail to inform the insurance company of any pertinent information, such as an accident that you maybe sorted out yourself, or a new medical condition that has a chance of affecting your driving ability, then it can void your entire policy if they find out. Of course, they may never find out, and some people like to gamble, I know. Up to you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always go through the full medical disclosure each time I renew my annual policy.

I usually start with MoneySupermarket which will allow me to choose ‘pre existing conditions’ then go through the medical stuff and give me quotes with several companies.

Annual premium has varied from about £125 to about £200. I can’t simply renew each year as the medical screening has to be done each time.

I work on the basis that insurance companies are all cheating bastards so will wriggle out of paying any claim if they can possibly find a way, so I make sure I do the screening.

"Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans."

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember being taught on a commercial law course that UK insurance contracts are contracts of "Utmost good faith" whereby you should declare something even if you think it may not affect the contract.

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/d/doctrineofutmostgoodfaith.asp

I am relying on worldwide insurance that came with a bank account I have, which provides cover up to £10M including repatration. There is a list of conditions they don't need to be notified of - eg hypertension. So long as my trip is no longer than 30 days I don't need to notify them or warn them of trips abroad. If I stay longer than 30 days I would need to notify them / purchase an extension. Reading reports from customers on the web it seems like a well run scheme and there are posts from people saying they were very well looked after when it was needed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, jaynewcastle said:

Something I've wondered about but never found the answer to. Different people have different opinions

 

If you don't declare a pre-existing medical condition, say for example asthma, does your entire travel insurance become invalid for any claim whatsoever, or would just claims relating to your undeclared pre-existing medical condition be denied ?

It's obvious why you get different opinions. That's due to:

- BMs are from too many countries

- Many companies in each country

- Each company has its own policy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Took out two paid policies last night for two next year 2019 trips.  Have always had the Citibank Platinum Rewards card free insurance but have ALWAYS worried that if I was ever in a position to actually need to use it (for emergency Injury/Accident) then I feel that the Thai providers of such medical services (ambulance, hospital, doctors, etc) would require at least a policy number to get in the gate.  Citibank in Aussie uses Allianz and I have read through their PDS thoroughly (more then once) and there is no policy number provided -  just an "automatic cover".  This cover seems quite adequate but if I was "out of it" so to speak, how would I get inside the hospital???

So bugger it,  now I will have an insurance policy number on my person at all times, for not a huge extra expense.  And for thread purposes, the new company spells out the pre-existing medical conditions situation much more clearer - basically cover is included for 43 pre-conditions "if not hospitalized  for that condition in the last 24 months and medications for the condition have remained unchanged for the last six months."   

Oh well, now can theoretically choose between two policies each trip :rolleyes:, but I can now sleep a bit better knowing there is a policy number to wave under their noses for emergency medical attention :Clap1: if I am ever unfortunate to need it...

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, davidge said:

I always go through the full medical disclosure each time I renew my annual policy.

I usually start with MoneySupermarket which will allow me to choose ‘pre existing conditions’ then go through the medical stuff and give me quotes with several companies.

Annual premium has varied from about £125 to about £200. I can’t simply renew each year as the medical screening has to be done each time.

I work on the basis that insurance companies are all cheating bastards so will wriggle out of paying any claim if they can possibly find a way, so I make sure I do the screening.

Yes, I always use MoneySupermarket to search for, & get my insurance too. Takes a lot more time now due to having 3 medical conditions that need to be declared, and the quotes/policy statements checked in greater detail

Per my original query, when I just had asthma, I always wondered if say you slipped & fell breaking your leg, whether if I hadn't declared that I had asthma, it would allow the insurance company to get out of paying for medical treatment or not. My insurance cost tripled, once I developed & had to start declaring I had asthma.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, Patts Luver said:

It's obvious why you get different opinions. That's due to:

- BMs are from too many countries

- Many companies in each country

- Each company has its own policy

I was thinking of just people in the UK I had discussed this with

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, jaynewcastle said:

Yes, I always use MoneySupermarket to search for, & get my insurance too. Takes a lot more time now due to having 3 medical conditions that need to be declared, and the quotes/policy statements checked in greater detail

Per my original query, when I just had asthma, I always wondered if say you slipped & fell breaking your leg, whether if I hadn't declared that I had asthma, it would allow the insurance company to get out of paying for medical treatment or not. My insurance cost tripled, once I developed & had to start declaring I had asthma.

I would say the policy is invalid if they find out you hadn’t declared a condition.

"Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans."

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's correct,some may payout as long as it's not the pre existing illness,but too me not worth the risk not saying

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When all the trouble happened at Gatwick with the Drones..... the insurance industry representatives differentiated between cheap and proper insurance policies...... it implied cheap policies won't payout 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.



  • COVID-19

    Any posts or topics which the moderation team deems to be rumours/speculatiom, conspiracy theory, scaremongering, deliberately misleading or has been posted to deliberately distort information will be removed - as will BMs repeatedly doing so. Existing rules also apply.

  • Advertise on Pattaya Addicts
  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.