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On 16/06/2020 at 09:04, storytime said:

I try and make my last meal before 4pm, hunger pains get me.

This is not a good strategy. You should have an 8 hour window to eat (like 2 pm - 10 pm) and have 2 meals + snack.

If you stop eating at 4 pm , you will have cravings (can't sleep properly) and then eat junk food because you are tired

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In no way, shape or form is broccoli a snack!!! 

Just a small update a year after I altered my diet! I´m still on "one meal a day", but have started to cheat with some occasional snacks in the afternoon like: 85% chocolate bar (home made w

Some 6 months ago I returned from Patts, in what can only be described as 'Lardy - Bloater' mode. I had one UK mate visit for 2 weeks, then I had the family come down from Udon to Pattaya for a week,

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Key should always be to lose fat not 'weight'. Preserving muscle mass should always be a key component of any diet.

Generally speaking, the fat always comes off before the muscle no matter what diet you are on. The body burns fat when it needs energy. When it runs out of fat, it goes to muscle. Is there any diet that goes counter to this?


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Eat once a day and you can have whatever the fuck you want and still lose weight.  I’ve been OMAD for almost 12 months. 

I try and make my last meal before 4pm, hunger pains get me.


Starvation is not a sustainable diet (for most normal people). It is not about how much you eat but what you eat. There is usually always a healthier alternative for whatever you enjoy. You just have to look for it!


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Western breakfast (eggs on toast) and dinner (Thai food) only.

Lots of water, sleep, and walking 90% of the time.

I try not to worry about my caffeine or alcohol intake but don’t over do it.

I usually drop 10-15 lbs each trip (30 days).



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  • 4 weeks later...

Certain foods are more filling for there calories is something you can consider. Intermittent fasting, eating 6 meals or 2 large meals, eating up until 6pm only etc. All are not really any better over the long term. Its calories in and calories out.

Somethings might work better for certain people because of there lifestyle, work times etc and when they naturally feel hungry. But letting yourself get very hungry and miserable is a disaster waiting to happen when the hormones kick in and will power is at its lowest.

Just try and consume filling types of food. They are generally fibre rich types of food. Anything processed is just not going to be as good as something natural. Oatmeal, greek low fat yoghurt, potatoes are some of the most filling foods for the calories they contain when studies have been done are a few ideas.

 

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Two great tips I received were to drink sparkling water with a squeeze of lemon which makes you feel full so you consume less food at meal time.  And eat lots of watermelon, low calories, good fibre, delicious and a great replacement for other sweet treats.  

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MickyBangBang

The trick is to find healthy activities you enjoy doing and a diet that you actually like and incorporate them into your life, then the byproduct of that lifestyle is a fit and healthy body. Pinning all your hopes on the latest fab diet or trendy workout is only going to end in disappointment and failure. Rather take a long strategic approach to how you live your life and then coupled with some perseverance and discipline you will reap the rewards in no time at all. 

 

I cycle to work, not far, only 5km, but it's mostly uphill on the way home in the evenings and I get a serious cardio workout, but most importantly I look forward to my cycles and love doing it. But cycling alone isn't enough, so I do two full body calisthenics workouts a week, if you want to be lean then you need to build some lean muscle, and I don't like gyms, so I do calisthenics in my garage, and again I love it, really hard to force yourself to do something week in and week out if you find it a drag.

 

And most importantly diet, you gotta watch what you eat, for me I go for whole foods that fill me up for longer, porridge in the morning, sandwich and soup for lunch, roast chicken and roast potatoes and veg for dinner, cup of tea and a biscuit then for a bit of supper, a big dirty pizza and a bag of chips then every Friday night to scoff down all to myself. Have fun, and if you're finding it hard then you probably need to change something around.

 

 

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Keto Diet

I am in Pattaya now and use the Pattaya Keto Delivery Service, she delivers lunch and dinner entry night for the next day and I make breakfast- eggs and 1 avocado

You will loose about 6 to 8 pounds the first week - water weight

in 11 weeks i’ve lost 39 pounds, she keeps me at 1800 calories a day

less than 20 carbs a day no sugar

the thing is I am never hungry, the high fat content keeps me feeling full

my blood sugar has stabilized

its the easiest Program I have been on 

Downside - I don’t eat out very often because I want to stay within my daily calorie count

no beer, not that I drank a lot before it’s more of the social aspect

it’s worth taking a look at on YouTube Dr Berg and Keto Connect can give you the information to get started if your interested 

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That sounds tough in Pattaya. No rice, no bowl of noodles, no mango or pineapple. Anybody eating 1800 calories a day is going to lose weight. That's a pretty low calorie count for anyone long term. I eat about 2800 calories and am fairly active and am 70kgs.

If its working for you then keep doing it but it sounds very restrictive and not a lot of fun lifestyle wise.

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It’s working but your right not a lot of fun, I really want to lose the weight though so the plan is to reach my goal weight and then I can have more flexibility in my diet

 

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7 hours ago, st lou said:

It’s working but your right not a lot of fun, I really want to lose the weight though so the plan is to reach my goal weight and then I can have more flexibility in my diet

 

I think something so restrictive has a tendency to want to make you binge eat . A bit like a build of resentment you can get over something over time. Restrictive diets can increase grehlin (the hunger hormone) and make you feel miserable.

I mean we are all different so a 1 fit diet and lifestyle for everybody wont work. But try and work with what you like that is healthy if that's possible. A list of food you enjoy that are filling and healthy and have a good micro nutrient profile. 

Go for a few walks a day and try some swimming or gym.

Foods like oatmeal, eggs, greek yoghurt and potatoes are considered very satiating for the calories they have.

I eat oatmeal every morning when I had high cholesterol (despite being very lean, non smoker and non drinker.......................genetics). I mix in some fruit some yoghurt and a few other things and water and soak it overnight in the fridge and eat. Lowers cholesterol and is filling and nutritious (and cheap).

Rice is not a very filling food for the calories it provides and white rice turns to sugar very quickly once its eaten. So i would stay away from eating lots of that. The noodle soups although made with rice often have lesser amounts of rice quantity in them and then some delicious and a bit of seafood or chicken or pork or beef and a few green veg would be something also very healthy for you. The seafood would also be very good as long as not to much fried food.

The quicker you lose the weight the more likely you will be to put it back on or fall off the diet.

Just try and work with the things you like and the meal times that fit in with your lifestyle. some people like intermittent fasting and some like OMAD and some like 6 small meals. None of them are really superior long term in weight loss. it comes down to science and maths................calories in and calories out long term. So the "diet" that fits in with your lifestyle and your food preferences that's healthy will be one that's more likely to be sustainable and allow you to be happy. Something like keto in Pattaya sounds expensive, and not much fun. If you cant sustain it long term then its not going to work out.

Large drops in your body weight in restrictive diets then ballooning back up once you stop it has shown to be quite harmful. When you binge eat and gain a lot of weight you produce more fat cells in your body. when you diet they shrink but those new ones don't disappear. once you over eat again your body gains weight more quickly due to having millions more fat cells that can store additional fat over someone who had a maintenance bodyweight most of there life.

Some studies are saying that this is 1 reason for the obesity problems now. Fat parents having kids and genetically pre disposing there kids to being more likely to be fat due to this sort of problems.

 

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Lift weights then cardio, have a good diet, sleep at least 7 hours, repeat  and be constant, what also helps its to cut sugars in everything like sodas coffes, try avena milk instead of normal milk, there is a plenty of ways to stay in shape but nothing is magical so:


Work Out (lift weights+cardio at the end)
Balanced Diet
Good Rest

from 3 to 5 days a week is key

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18 hours ago, vedder529 said:

white rice turns to sugar very quickly once its eaten.

I hear a lot of 'facts' like this one - things turning into other things when we eat them, like un-used protein being 'turned into' fat and un-used carbohydrates also in the same way. And in reverse, that sugar being 'burned off' if you exercise enough. I don't know what the evidence is for any of it, but I'd like to.

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2 hours ago, jed§ said:

I hear a lot of 'facts' like this one - things turning into other things when we eat them, like un-used protein being 'turned into' fat and un-used carbohydrates also in the same way. And in reverse, that sugar being 'burned off' if you exercise enough. I don't know what the evidence is for any of it, but I'd like to.

While most of the calories in white and brown rice come from carbohydrates, white rice has a higher glycemic index than brown rice. This means that a serving of white rice provides a quicker blood sugar spike, which, according to Harvard Medical School, “has almost the same effect as eating pure table sugar”.Jun 22, 2020

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How Rice Affects Blood Sugar & Hunger

ByAglaee JacobUpdated December 06, 2018
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The extent to which different foods affect your blood sugar levels also influences how hungry you will feel. It is mostly foods that contain carbohydrates, such as bread, pasta and rice, that can make your blood sugar levels go up. The more your blood sugar level swings after eating, the more likely you are to have uneven energy levels and to crave more carbohydrate-containing foods in the next several hours. Most types of rice are quickly digested into sugar that can result in high blood sugar levels and increased hunger.

Carbohydrate Content

All types of rice, brown or white, long or short, are packed with carbohydrates. A cup of cooked rice provides an average of 45 grams of carbohydrates, which is the equivalent to the amount found in three slices of bread. Some people can easily eat 2 cups of rice at a time, and this is the amount many restaurants serve, which adds up to 90 grams of carbs or the equivalent of six slices of bread. All of these carbohydrates are broken down into sugar and end up in your blood after eating rice. A serving of rice providing 90 grams of carbohydrates will break down to about the same amount of sugar found in 22 teaspoons of sugar. This will significantly increase your blood sugar levels.

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2 hours ago, vedder529 said:

white rice has a higher glycemic index

Thank you for both of your posts - interesting information, although I don't understand what 'glycaemic index' means, but it sounds good! So, even though the Thai rice my partner buys contains 0% sugar, the fact that it is 78% carbohydrate means that it is, in effect, 78% sugar?? I know I might sound ignorant but I am confused by it all.

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1 minute ago, jed§ said:

Thank you for both of your posts - interesting information, although I don't understand what 'glycaemic index' means, but it sounds good! So, even though the Thai rice my partner buys contains 0% sugar, the fact that it is 78% carbohydrate means that it is, in effect, 78% sugar?? I know I might sound ignorant but I am confused by it all.

"The Glycemic Index (GI) is a relative ranking of carbohydrate in foods according to how they affect blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates with a low GI value (55 or less) are more slowly digested, absorbed and metabolised and cause a lower and slower rise in blood glucose and, therefore usually, insulin levels."

White rice because it does not have a lof of fibre in it is broken down quickly in the body after eating and spikes your blood glucose quickly (simulating what actual sugar does) and therefore increases peoples chances to get type 2 diabetes and so on. Brown rice which has a bit more fibre takes longer to digest and does not spike your blood sugar as much and is more filling because of that.

White rice, white bread are more refined and have less fibre. So try and get woild rice, brown rice, basmati rice if possible. will fill you up a little longer and not spike your blood sugar. those spikes mean a crash shortly afterward and feel hungry again leading to over eating.

 

All food is made up of

carbohydrate - 4 calories per gram

protein - 4 calories per gram

fats- 9 calories per gram

water- no calories

 

Carbohydrates are not bad at all. Its just some carb foods react differently in our body. Oatmeal for example is mostly carbohydrate. But its much more filling than rice. Is slow digesting so wont spike blood glucose like white rice does. Has a lot of fibre to make you feel full for longer.

 

 

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11 hours ago, vedder529 said:

White rice because it does not have a lof of fibre in it is broken down quickly in the body after eating and spikes your blood glucose quickly (simulating what actual sugar does) and therefore increases peoples chances to get type 2 diabetes and so on. Brown rice which has a bit more fibre takes longer to digest and does not spike your blood sugar as much and is more filling

Thank you for your knowledgeable response. I've found this as well. If I eat brown rice in the evening before a run I seem to have more energy during the run, whereas whenever I've eaten white rice I've felt 'drained' on the run - less bouncy and energetic. Also, I hear of a lot of Thai people having diabetes, although I've no evidence that it's more prevalent than in the west or elsewhere.

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On 18/11/2020 at 19:57, jed§ said:

Thank you for your knowledgeable response. I've found this as well. If I eat brown rice in the evening before a run I seem to have more energy during the run, whereas whenever I've eaten white rice I've felt 'drained' on the run - less bouncy and energetic. Also, I hear of a lot of Thai people having diabetes, although I've no evidence that it's more prevalent than in the west or elsewhere.

 

The white rice leading to diabetes is a little bit complicated. Its also linked to a lack of exercise and low protein levels as well. I know in Philippines where I have stayed extensively a lot of people in the provinces sit around all day and eat a lot of rice and not a lot else. those people are at a high risk of developing diabetes. Some exercise and eating a decent amount of protein on top of a lot of rice reduces the risks a decent amount.

 

Moderation is the key with all these things but how to say that to someone who eats 3 meals a day and 2 cups of rice each meal...............

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