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Board Members over age 50: When was your last Colonoscopy?


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Alternative is non-invasive MRI scan.

 

Personally I prefer the tender inspection by a TG.

 

A colonoscopy is not invasive unless every day your poop is an invasion too.

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Don't know what official NHS guidance is in the U.K. but I'm 54 and it's never been suggested. I went to my GP a couple of years ago with what I thought was a possible issue and he just did a blood t

Upon reading this thread I thought I would do a little research, which complicated the matter even more when comparing the various learned faculties and finding them to be almost balanced in those say

2 guys i play hockey with who are surgeons , both told me unless there is a family history or symptoms, they DO NOT recommend it, as there are risks involved under going this procedure.

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A colonoscopy is not invasive unless every day your poop is an invasion too.

Dunno about you bro,but I don't introduce my shit,into my ass.

Up to you though.

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No I had mouth cancer

 

I'm very sorry to hear that, and I hope for the best of you at this point.

 

Although I've never been diagnosed with cancer, it is a serious concern.  Every November, I go to an event called DanceFAR - Dance For a Reason - where many dancers and dance companies perform pro-bono to raise money for cancer research and prevention.  While the federal government does provide much for treatment, it does little with respect to the research component, and that is often left, with challenging funding, to universities and non-profits.

 

http://www.dancefar.org/a-b-o-u-t/

 

At the last DanceFAR event I attended, cancer survivors were talking about what got them so committed to this objective.

 

The organization that we raise money for is CPIC - Cancer Prevention Institute of California:

 

http://www.cpic.org/

 

This thread is a discussion about both the treatment, and prevention, of colon cancer.  As with all cancers, both prevention and treatment options are being talked about here in a mostly cordial and informative manner.  Initially, I brought up this thread because I recently turned 50 and I'm a little anxious about the uncomfortable prep and procedure.  I am now glad I brought it up, despite being trolled by one user, as there's a lot of valuable information and input being shared.

 

I do believe that while treatment is important, both research and prevention are crucial components as well.

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Last October. "You have a beautiful colon...See you in ten years." Exact quote from MD.

 

Although I didn't clarify that above, I expect to get a similar result, and then likely ten years (assuming nothing is found) is more likely based upon my overall health.

 

If this is the case, it'll be a relief, and certainly piece of mind, to know that I won't have to return until age 60.  In the less likely event that something is discovered, I will have been glad that I was pro-active, and headed the advice of my doctors and family who urged me to have a colonoscopy at age 50 (been told since age 47 by my doctor(s) that I should do this at age 50).

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It is interesting that on this issue, there is a discrepancy between the Canadian Cancer Society and the American Cancer Society in the colon cancer screening guidelines.

As was mentioned above, for people without risk factors, the Canadians recommend the stool test and not a colonoscopy. The Americans recommend either a colonoscopy (or a different -scopy) OR a stool test

 

http://www.cancer.org/healthy/findcancerearly/cancerscreeningguidelines/american-cancer-society-guidelines-for-the-early-detection-of-cancer

 

I am not 50 yet, but I think I will pick the stool test when the time comes. I do NOT enjoy having objects stuck up my rectum,

 

In the USA, it can also vary between HMO's (Health Maintenance Organizations) and PPO's (Preferred Provider Organizations). A friend of mine has Kaiser HMO, for example, and they are more prone to the stool test and as they're more managed, and like to cut costs, they tend to fine-tune their criteria for the latter.  My friend told me he was sent the home tool kit, and that if stool test is okay, they might not be given a colonoscopy.

 

This, among many other reasons, is why HMO's are not for me.  I like to be able to choose any doctor or specialist on my own, within the parameters of the PPO, and not have to go through a primary care physician gatekeeper.

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Utter nonsense. Really don't discourage non-mentals over 50 with such silly claims.

 

In a 2008 systematic review of 12 studies totaling 57,742 colonoscopies performed for average risk screening, the pooled overall serious adverse event rate was 2.8 per 1000 procedures.3 The risk of some complications may be higher if the colonoscopy is performed for an indication other than screening.

 

Adverse event does not equal 3 in 1000 dead like a mackerel.

 

I wholeheartedly agree with you on this.  Also, the specific quality of care can also significantly reduce risk, while conversely, lower quality services may increase it:

 

"The rate of complications varies with the practitioner and institution performing the procedure, as well as a function of other variables."

 

I have to believe that the treatment for colon cancer is far worse than a colonoscopy

 

Very well said!  BM's should stop fear-mongering about colon cancer prevention.

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Had my first one at 52.....was putting it off....it was pretty painless....the prep is much easier now as you only have to drink two much smaller liquids mixed with a medicine that tastes like bad lemonaide.  The procedure itself was a breeze.  All cleared and dont need to come back for another one until 5 years later

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In the USA, it can also vary between HMO's (Health Maintenance Organizations) and PPO's (Preferred Provider Organizations). A friend of mine has Kaiser HMO, for example, and they are more prone to the stool test and as they're more managed, and like to cut costs, they tend to fine-tune their criteria for the latter.  My friend told me he was sent the home tool kit, and that if stool test is okay, they might not be given a colonoscopy.

 

This, among many other reasons, is why HMO's are not for me.  I like to be able to choose any doctor or specialist on my own, within the parameters of the PPO, and not have to go through a primary care physician gatekeeper.

 

Upon leaving a job I had a physical at my health care provider at the time (K,,,,,,) since I hadn't had one in at least 5 yrs. Whether I wasn't a good marketing choice (leaving their care due to job change), oversight, some other reason...I was considered pre-diabetic but in need of no further tests. 

 

The health care provider I landed with did a physical 5 times more thorough, said the "pre-diabetic" diagnosis was wrong, ordered tests including an EKG and colonoscopy. The "K" provider still sends me marketing materials tempting me to rejoin. "No, "no" and "no". 

 

Back to the point, I attended a university cultural event and one of the speakers was there to advocate colonoscopy. Her husband hadn't done that and was absent from the event due to being occupied with dying painfully of colon cancer. 

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Family history of colon/bowel cancer and extremely sad to watch a loved one pass away to such a revolting illness.  

 

Recently had my fourth colonoscopy on a 3 yearly cycle.  So far I have had 5 polyps removed, which means having the colonoscopies and removing the polyps has saved my life.

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It is interesting that on this issue, there is a discrepancy between the Canadian Cancer Society and the American Cancer Society in the colon cancer screening guidelines.

As was mentioned above, for people without risk factors, the Canadians recommend the stool test and not a colonoscopy. The Americans recommend either a colonoscopy (or a different -scopy) OR a stool test

 

http://www.cancer.org/healthy/findcancerearly/cancerscreeningguidelines/american-cancer-society-guidelines-for-the-early-detection-of-cancer

 

I am not 50 yet, but I think I will pick the stool test when the time comes. I do NOT enjoy having objects stuck up my rectum,

 

USA and Canada have different health care systems (some might prefer the word 'industries' to 'systems', but call it what you will). It would be nice to think they exert no influence over their respective cancer society's guidelines, but I can see where some might consider that a plausible explanation. One person might argue the Canadians are trying to manage costs by discouraging a more thorough cancer screening technique, another might say it's the Americans who are promoting an unnecessary screening procedure.Take your pick.

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My HMO, Kaiser Permanente, wants me to have one every seven years once I turned 50, as they do with every male 50 and over. I have no history of cancer in my family. That gallon of stuff you have to drink prior to the procedure has ruined lemonade for me.  

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I had one at 52 and three polyps the size of golf balls were removed (1.5")

This was on a Friday, so no results would be available before Monday PM.

Over the weekend I Googled and Googled and Goggled. 

I found that polyps that size are 50% change of cancer.

Add 50% + 50% + 50% and I arrived at 87.5% change of cancer.

Further to that my mom had colon cancer, which was surgically eliminated, but I was at high risk (polyps and family)

Talk about a weekend of fretting.

Results came back as all benign.

Colon cancer has a very high cure rate if caught early, but otherwise can be deadly

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Upon reading this thread I thought I would do a little research, which complicated the matter even more when comparing the various learned faculties and finding them to be almost balanced in those say one should and those saying you should not. So I dropped by PBH to be told absolutely I should and would I like to make an appointment, I declined without even asking the price.

 

I then phoned a medical consultant I am acquainted with in Singapore who advised that if I was concerned I should pop along to any hospital  and have a FIT ( The fecal immunochemical test). Otherwise relax as in his opinion having a colonoscopy when into your seventies the benefits are matched by the risks.

 

​Now I am sure there will be many learned folk here that will argue both recommendations, however as always you pay your money and makes your choice, that being the case I think I will get a G&T and forget about it.

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Now I am sure there will be many learned folk here that will argue both recommendations, however as always you pay your money and makes your choice, that being the case I think I will get a G&T and forget about it.

The poo test (that is the technical name for it...:P) only costs 200 Baht at the Lifecare Lab.

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Upon reading this thread I thought I would do a little research, which complicated the matter even more when comparing the various learned faculties and finding them to be almost balanced in those say one should and those saying you should not. So I dropped by PBH to be told absolutely I should and would I like to make an appointment, I declined without even asking the price.

 

I then phoned a medical consultant I am acquainted with in Singapore who advised that if I was concerned I should pop along to any hospital  and have a FIT ( The fecal immunochemical test). Otherwise relax as in his opinion having a colonoscopy when into your seventies the benefits are matched by the risks.

 

​Now I am sure there will be many learned folk here that will argue both recommendations, however as always you pay your money and makes your choice, that being the case I think I will get a G&T and forget about it.

And judging by the pics of Gin in the other thread,you need some good Gin as well.Jesus man.

IMG_7510.JPG

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I am due for another one this summer. The last two they have found polyps, though they were non cancerous. They cost me nothing with my insurance in the states. The doctor sedates me and I can't feel thing. It is three years between exams. My insurance is with medicare and a medicare supplement I have as part of retirement package. I had my first colonoscopy at 50 and I am now 68.

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Upon reading this thread I thought I would do a little research, which complicated the matter even more when comparing the various learned faculties and finding them to be almost balanced in those say one should and those saying you should not. So I dropped by PBH to be told absolutely I should and would I like to make an appointment, I declined without even asking the price.

 

I then phoned a medical consultant I am acquainted with in Singapore who advised that if I was concerned I should pop along to any hospital and have a FIT ( The fecal immunochemical test). Otherwise relax as in his opinion having a colonoscopy when into your seventies the benefits are matched by the risks.

 

Now I am sure there will be many learned folk here that will argue both recommendations, however as always you pay your money and makes your choice, that being the case I think I will get a G&T and forget about it.

The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) or Guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT) are not tests are to be negated, HOWEVER, they are mostly "after the fact

They are tests that look for tiny amounts of blood in stool.

In other words if a polyp is bleeding you already have cancer.

If lucky such cancer may be contained in the polyp and not have spread (pre-cancer) and a subsequent colonoscopy might fix things, but likely a full cancer treatment is required and which can lead to colostomy or ileostomy.

Of course there are a silver lining to everything and with a colostomy or ileostomy you will never have to wipe you ass or use a bum gun again.

 

A colonoscopy takes a day out of you life every 10 years if all is good, but it allows for polyp removal before they become cancerous where the FIT and gFOBT tests detects only a real cancer or pre-cancer.

These tests also have false positives.

Foe example an ulcer or a simple hemorrhoid will test as cancer.

 

Most people who have had a colposcopy (including myself) will say that it is near uneventful with the prep work being the worst (or only) bad part.

When I had mine I watched it all on a monitor and was joking with the doctor ... until I heard "oh my God"

The polyps I had were benign, but I was told that with near 100% certainty that they would have become cancerous in due time.

I am glad I did not wait till they became cancer so a FIT and gFOBT could confirm that.

 

 

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Had a few in Thailand. I have colitus. Last one was about one year ago.

Good on you to keep checking and with colitis you may fail a FIT and gFOBT test anyway.

When I was a teen I had a "somewhat" painful hemorrhoid that I took it upon myself to cut.

It was bleeding like crazy when I did it, and now 40+ years later it has never flared up again, but occasionally does bleed.

So I most likely would fail a FIT and gFOBT test as you would.

When I had my colonoscopy I asked for that to be examined as well and the doctor saw clear signs but said that with there are no flair-ups the light bleeding as a small streak on the stool is nothing to worry about.

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Not over 50 but my grandfather died of bowel cancer.

 

I'm 36, my health insurance company pays for me to have one every 2 years since I turned 30

 

They obviously have my best interest at heart......!

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One of those test kits help save the life of a work colleague, He didn't know there was a problem until that test and they indicated that he need to go to his GP for further tests and it turned out he had bowel cancer. The operation and whatever else was involved knocked him about a bit.

I've used two test kits sent to me, first one at 50 and again at 55. As you implied the cancer is treatable if detected early so worth the inconvenience to do the test. One less thing to worry about.
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hmmm - just flipped through here. Obviously there are some differences of opinions. 

 

I'll share my own experience. I am 67. I have had the procedure done twice because the doc recommended it when I turned 55. They found something. It was benign. I am due again in a few years and will do it again. 

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More than 10 years ago my US Dr. said it was time.  I didn't like the sound of it, so I gave myself some breaks.

I figured out I could get it done in Bangkok at the upscale Bumrungrad facility for less than my copay would be to have it done at home.  I booked a nearby upscale hotel and scheduled it .

As others have said the procedure is no big deal but the prep is nasty. They provided a dvd of the result.

Dr says its time again.  I'd like to find legit Dr.'s who work with alternative providers combining therapeutic colon cleanse procedure followed by this exam.

Anyone know if this is possible?

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Had my colonoscopy done at age 50 and I did not feel a thing since I was knocked out w/anesthesia.  But a very painful and uncomfortable experience with the flex sigmoidoscopy where they don’t knock you out.  I remember the assisting nurse telling me to relax, relax and I wanted to reply to her with a few choice words.

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At the end of the day if we elect not to have a colonoscopy then we have to face the consequences - it may mean a very slow extremely painful and disgusting way to die.  Not to mention the stench from someone dying from colon cancer is something you do not want to put loved ones through.

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