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Board Members over age 50: When was your last Colonoscopy?


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For those board members over age 50, when was your last colonoscopy?

 

And if so, based upon the first one, and the results of the test, what was advised for your subsequent?  One year, three years, more than five years, etc.?

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Don't know what official NHS guidance is in the U.K. but I'm 54 and it's never been suggested. I went to my GP a couple of years ago with what I thought was a possible issue and he just did a blood t

Upon reading this thread I thought I would do a little research, which complicated the matter even more when comparing the various learned faculties and finding them to be almost balanced in those say

2 guys i play hockey with who are surgeons , both told me unless there is a family history or symptoms, they DO NOT recommend it, as there are risks involved under going this procedure.

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Following with interest.

Never had one,I'm 45 but had a friend recently die of colon cancer.

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Following with interest.

Never had one,I'm 45 but had a friend recently die of colon cancer.

 

It's been argued that if everyone had colonoscopy(s), colon cancer could theoretically be non-existent, or close to zero.

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Is it necessary to have one without any indications of any issues? I would have thought not. You are probably better to first submit your poo for testing for blood content.

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I had mine done right after I turned 50 and the insurance would cover it.  It was nice and clean inside and I was told I wouldn't need another one for 10 years.  The poo blood test should be good enough for the intervening years I guess.

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Following with interest.

Never had one,I'm 45 but had a friend recently die of colon cancer.

Great a new life threatening ailment to worry about ! Now I can google it and convince myself I have it.

 

I did a health check-up at BKK-pattaya hospital a year ago. They didnt mention checking specifically for colon cancer. But did check pooh and blood.

 

Certainly no devices inserted into primary weapon portal. (Just watched independence day).

 

Is it worth having a specific check?

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I just turned 40 and have had one every 3-4 years since I was 30.

 

Family has a history in younger years getting it.

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Is it worth having a specific check?

 

I just turned 40 and have had one every 3-4 years since I was 30.

 

Family has a history in younger years getting it.

 

My doctor says that if you're extremely healthy, and no family history, one can wait until age 50.

 

All of my doctors, mom, dad, and just about everyone I know who's familiar with the established medical science on this matter believes that this should absolutely be done at age 50 and onward, depending upon the advice of the specialist for subsequent exams.

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Never. And the free bowel cancer check kit the government sends out when you're 49 has been sitting on the sideboard where I lobbed it since the day it arrived. Prolly should get onto that.

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There are many articles with respect to the subject of colonoscopy vs stool test, but as I state with everything medically or science related on this board, one should primarily go with their trusted primary physician over the internet or PA board members.

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Age for the first exam and frequency of repeats depends on patient age, family history and findings. A 10 year interval after a negative results exam and no family history is normal, just as are more frequent exams. My doctor, with a family history, has had 7. I'll probably opt for virtual (xray) colonoscopy next time but believe a conventional one is better for a 1st exam.

 

Colon cancer is reportedly one of the most painful ways to go and is far more treatable if caught early. If your MD doesn't suggest screening to you, you should suggest it to the MD.  


My doctor says that if you're extremely healthy, and no family history, one can wait until age 50.

 

All of my doctors, mom, dad, and just about everyone I know who's familiar with the established medical science on this matter believes that this should absolutely be done at age 50 and onward, depending upon the advice of the specialist for subsequent exams.

 

Agreed. While not the most comfortable of exams, it's less stressful than worrying about undiagnosed cancer and FAR FAR better than getting colon cancer. Just do it. 

Edited by CyberPro
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Yep, while not the most comfortable of exams, it's less stressful than worrying about undiagnosed cancer and FAR FAR better than getting colon cancer. Just do it.

 

Agreed on the discomfort concerns. I haven't had one yet, but each of the doctors I've spoken with has said that I'll be put under, but more likely, partially under. I also plan to set up the pre-appointment with the doctor shortly.

 

From what I understand, the worst part of it is the prep, cleaning out your colon, etc. (I'll avoid the graphic details), but from those who have had it, the colonoscopy isn't so bad or discomforting, and once you've completed the prep, the hard part is over.

Edited by ruay
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The prep is shit, literally!

 

By the end of the cleansing I put the TV in front of toilet and just sat there.

 

Got sick of getting up every two minutes.

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Never. And the free bowel cancer check kit the government sends out when you're 49 has been sitting on the sideboard where I lobbed it since the day it arrived. Prolly should get onto that.

 

 

 

One of those test kits help save the life of a work colleague, He  didn't know there was a problem until that test and they indicated that he need to go to his GP for further tests and it turned out he had bowel cancer.  The operation and whatever else was involved knocked him about a bit.

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My doctor is recommending me to have one at 41 due to family history. But also advised it is a serious decision as 1-3 deaths per thousand result from complications having the procedure. Still weighing up the positives and negatives.

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My doctor is recommending me to have one at 41 due to family history. But also advised it is a serious decision as 1-3 deaths per thousand result from complications having the procedure. Still weighing up the positives and negatives.

Sounds a bit unbelievable - that a test for colon cancer would result in about 2 deaths per 1000 tests. No one would choose to have the test surely ?

 

Have I misunderstood ?

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Sounds a bit unbelievable - that a test for colon cancer would result in about 2 deaths per 1000 tests. No one would choose to have the test surely ?

 

Have I misunderstood ?

 

 

 

Maybe in a million  or more maybe?

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Source Wiki:  Colonoscopy - Wikipedia

 

 

Risks[edit]

1 in 200 people who have a colonoscopy have a serious complication.[17] Perforation of the colon occurs at a rate of about 1 in 1000 procedures, and death at a rate of 1 in 3300 to 1 in 333000; therefore, in some low-risk populations, screening in the absence of symptoms would not outweigh the risks of the procedure. For example, the odds of developing colorectal cancer between the ages of 20 and 40 are only 1 in 1250.[18] This procedure has a low (0.35%) risk of serious complications.[19][20] In a 2006 study of colonoscopies done from 1994 to 2002, Levin et al., found serious complications occurred in 1 of 200 colonoscopies,[17] comprising 1 in 1250 colonoscopies without biopsy or polypectomy, and a rate of 7.0 per 1000 for colonoscopies with biopsy or polypectomy; although McDonell and Loura criticize this rate as being unacceptably high.[21]

The rate of complications varies with the practitioner and institution performing the procedure, as well as a function of other variables.

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2.3 complications per thousand is about right - complication can mean anything from fever/infection to a perforation to death or contracting a secondary disease because the 'scope was not properly cleaned (Hepatitis and possibly HIV) 

 

This number gets a little muddled - if it is only a colonoscopy with no polyps removed the rate of complications is 0.8 per thousand (0.6 of those being a perforation of the intestine).

 

When polyps are removed  during a colonoscopy the rate goes up, but that's be expected since you've cut out tissue in a very active environment. Have pre-cancerous polyps removed is still far, far better than allowing them to remain and possibly go malignant. 

 

The most common indications for colonoscopy were polyps seen on sigmoidoscopy (45%, with nearly all involving biopsy) and history of polyps (23%, with half involving biopsy); only 0.7% were primary screening tests. The overall incidence of serious complications was 5 per 1000. Among 5235 colonoscopies that did not involve biopsies, the incidence of serious complications was 0.8 per 1000; the incidence of perforations was 0.6 per 1000. Among 11,083 colonoscopies that involved biopsies, the incidence of serious complications was 7.0 per 1000; the incidence of bleeding was 4.8 per 1000 (1.4 for bleeding requiring surgery or transfusion), and the incidence of perforation was 1.1 per 1000. The risk for perforation was higher in patients aged 60 and older. Overall, 40% of all serious complications and 62% of bleeding episodes occurred after removal of polyps smaller than 10 mm.

 

http://www.jwatch.org/jw200701160000001/2007/01/16/serious-complications-colonoscopy-are-not-rare

 

 


 

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Don't know what official NHS guidance is in the U.K. but I'm 54 and it's never been suggested.

I went to my GP a couple of years ago with what I thought was a possible issue and he just did a blood test. No other investigations.

 

 

 

A friend had colon exam and when the doctor put on the rubber glove the friend asked him if he could use two fingers instead of one.

When the Doctor asked why, he said it was because he wanted a second opinion.

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Sounds a bit unbelievable - that a test for colon cancer would result in about 2 deaths per 1000 tests. No one would choose to have the test surely ?

 

Have I misunderstood ?

 

0.2% death rate does not sound plausible;  I'm going to ask the doctor. 

 

Again, when it comes to medical science, I recommend going by the guidance of a primary physician you trust, and not the internet or PA board members.

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[21]

The rate of complications varies with the practitioner and institution performing the procedure, as well as a function of other variables.

 

^

 

This is key!

Edited by ruay
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The prep is shit, literally!

 

By the end of the cleansing I put the TV in front of toilet and just sat there.

 

Got sick of getting up every two minutes.

 

I thought we were going to avoid the graphic details.

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