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Injections, Where & when to get a injections before going to thailand?.


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Hi I am going for the first time to thailand. I am 26 years old eurepean. Where and when I should get injections, before going to thailand?. I mean how long before departure ? one month?. where I can do it in UK? How much does it cost? And what it will protect me from ?.

 

should i bother whit it or forget about it ?

 

 

 

Thank You

 

 

 

ps.

any idea about this ? :

 

Hepatitus

Polio booster

Tetnus

Typhoid

www.Pattaya-Thai.com - Pattaya, Thailand News and Social Network.

 

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Ms. Palmer: "Are there any inoculations or any special medically-related preparations I should make before coming?"

 

BNH Hospital answers: "Dear Ms. Palmer, Here are the list of vaccination recommended if you are to stay in Thailand for more than three months: 1. Influenza 2. Hepatitis A 3. Typhoid 5. JE 6. Rabies 7. Tetanus/diphtheria. For a short stay (less than three months) only number 1-3 is recommended. The vaccinations should be taken 2 weeks before the trip. Many people seems to be interested in the Malaria issue. Some advice are that Bangkok is not a risk area, taking Malaria tablet is not necessary. Wearing long sleeve shirt and apply the anti-mosquito lotions to prevent mosquito bite would be sufficient."

 

http://www.khaosanroad.com/health2_p2.htm

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Ms. Palmer: "Are there any inoculations or any special medically-related preparations I should make before coming?"

 

BNH Hospital answers: "Dear Ms. Palmer, Here are the list of vaccination recommended if you are to stay in Thailand for more than three months: 1. Influenza 2. Hepatitis A 3. Typhoid 5. JE 6. Rabies 7. Tetanus/diphtheria. For a short stay (less than three months) only number 1-3 is recommended. The vaccinations should be taken 2 weeks before the trip. Many people seems to be interested in the Malaria issue. Some advice are that Bangkok is not a risk area, taking Malaria tablet is not necessary. Wearing long sleeve shirt and apply the anti-mosquito lotions to prevent mosquito bite would be sufficient."

 

http://www.khaosanroad.com/health2_p2.htm

 

good advice jizz flicker, but you've give a link to koa san road! Full of back packer low life cunts!

 

Oh sorry no love there!

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Found this here: Travel Medicine Program

 

11. TRAVEL MEDICINE PROGRAM

 

The Public Health Agency of Canada and the World Health Organization (WHO) report on disease outbreaks that occur throughout the world. For the latest travel health advisories and related information, visit the Public Health Agency of Canada’s Travel Medicine Program Web site.

 

The Public Health Agency of Canada continues to closely monitor and report on occurrences of avian influenza A (H5N1), or "bird flu", in humans and in birds. Further information on avian influenza A (H5N1) and recommendations for travellers can be found on the Public Health Agency of Canada's Travel Medicine Web site as well as on the World Health Organization's Web site. For more information, see our Current Issue on Avian Influenza.

 

The Public Health Agency of Canada strongly recommends that your travel plans include contacting a travel medicine clinic or physician six to eight weeks before departure. Based on your individual risk assessment, a health care professional can determine your need for immunizations and/or preventive medication and advise you on precautions to avoid disease. Travellers are reminded to ensure that their routine (childhood) immunizations (e.g., tetanus, diphtheria, polio, and measles) are up to date.

 

Standards of medical care may differ from those in Canada. Treatment may be expensive, and payment in advance may be required. Travellers are advised to arrange for medical insurance prior to departure. Prescription medications should be kept in the original container and packed in carry-on luggage.

 

The Public Health Agency of Canada also recommends that travellers who become sick or feel unwell on their return to Canada seek a medical assessment with their personal physician. Travellers should inform their physician that they have been travelling or living outside of Canada.

 

12. ADDITIONAL HEALTH INFORMATION

 

In some areas of Thailand, proof of insurance may be required to obtain emergency medical care. Emergency evacuation may cost tens of thousands of dollars or more, depending on the location and severity of the condition. Medical care varies in quality across the country. Travellers in need of medical care are encouraged to go to Bangkok, where hospitals that meet international standards may be found.

 

Rabies vaccination is recommended due to numerous stray dogs throughout Bangkok.

 

Found this here: Immunizations

 

Immunizations Recommended for Travel Outside of Canada

If you are planning to travel outside of Canada, you may require immunizations, depending on your travel destination, the length of your stay and whether or not your routine immunizations are up-to-date. Since it can take several weeks for an immunization to protect you against a disease, you should consult a travel health clinic or your family physician 6 to 8 weeks before your trip in order to allow enough time for the vaccines or immunizing agent to take effect.

 

The actual immunizations you may require will vary according to your age, health, and any pre-existing medical conditions, as well as the nature of your travel, whether you will be staying in city hotels or travelling in remote rural areas. A travel health clinic or family physician should assess your individual circumstances and provide any vaccines that may be required for your trip. This is especially important if you plan to travel with infants or young children. Specific changes to the routine childhood immunization schedule, as well as additional vaccines that may be recommended for infants and young children who travel are outlined in the Canadian Immunization Guide, Sixth Edition, 2002.

 

A list of diseases for which immunization may be required follows. Those which are recommended as part of the routine immunizations in Canada are marked with an asterisk *.

 

Diphtheria*

European tick borne Encephalitis

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis B*

Japanese Encephalitis

Measles*

Meningococcal meningitis

Poliomyelitis*

Rabies

Rubella*

Tetanus*

Typhoid

Yellow Fever

 

 

Diphtheria*

 

Diphtheria is an acute bacterial infection of the throat, nose and tonsils, resulting in lesions in the infected area. In severe cases, it can cause swelling and fluid build-up in the neck. Diphtheria can also infect the skin, causing lesions similar to impetigo. In Canada, a diphtheria booster shot is recommended every 10 years. All travellers should have up-to-date diphtheria shots prior to travel. This is particularly important because of the resurgence of diphtheria in some Eastern European countries.

 

European tick borne Encephalitis

 

European tick borne encephalitis is a viral disease resembling other encephalitides transmitted by mosquito bite. This disease is transmitted by tick bites and has a longer duration of symptoms. Vaccination is recommended for long-term travellers to areas where this disease is widespread, specifically areas of Russia and other countries of the former Soviet Union as well as parts of Europe during April through August. This vaccine is not routinely available in Canada. You should contact a travel health clinic to assess your need for this vaccine and to make arrangements to obtain the vaccine through the Public Health Agency of Canada's Special Access Programme . For additional information on European tick borne Encephalitis, click here.

 

 

Hepatitis A

 

Hepatitis A is a viral disease affecting the liver. The symptoms include abrupt fever, malaise, loss of appetite, nausea and abdominal discomfort, followed by jaundice (yellowing of skin colour). Hepatitis A varies in severity and duration of the illness. In rare cases it can cause fatal liver damage. Protection against Hepatitis A through immunization with Hepatitis A vaccine is recommended for travellers to developing countries, especially rural areas, or areas where the hygenic quality of food and water supply is likely to be poor, or areas where Hepatitis A is widespread. For infants

 

 

Hepatitis B*

 

Hepatitis B is also a viral disease affecting the liver. Usually more serious than Hepatitis A, its symptoms include gradual development of fever, loss of appetite, abdominal discomfort, nausea and vomiting, joint pain, rash and frequently progresses to jaundice. Its severity also varies, but a greater percentage of cases will involve destruction of the liver cells resulting in liver failure and death. Unlike Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B is transmitted through contact with infected blood and other body fluids. Any traveller who will be staying in an area with widespread Hepatitis B for longer than 6 months, or who is doing medical work, or who is likely to have contact with blood or sexual contact with residents of such areas, should be immunized with Hepatitis B vaccine.

 

 

Japanese Encephalitis

 

Japanese encephalitis (JE) is caused by a virus transmitted by mosquito bite. It causes an acute inflammation of the brain, spinal cord and the membranes surrounding them which can result in high fever, headache, disorientation, tremors, convulsions occasionally and coma. This disease occurs throughout most of East Asia from India east to Korea and Japan during the late summer and early fall. It also occurs sporadically throughout the year in tropical areas of Southeast Asia including Thailand. Vaccination is recommended for travel to any area prone to JE for more than 4 weeks. You should contact a travel health clinic in order to have your specific needs assessed.

 

 

Measles*

 

Measles is an acute highly infectious disease caused by a virus. A fever usually develops before the symptoms which include inflammation of the tissue around the eyes, inflammation of the nasal tissues with severe runny nose, cough and red blotchy rash on the skin. Two doses of measles vaccine are recommended for all unimmunized travellers aged > 1 year who were born after 1970 and who are en route to a measles endemic area, unless there is serologic proof of immunity or physician documentation of prior measles. For additional information on Measles, click here.

 

 

Meningococcal meningitis

 

Meningococcal meningitis is an acute bacterial infection resulting in the sudden development of fever, intense headache, nausea and often vomiting, stiff neck and a distinctive rash. Severe cases can result in delirium and coma and, if untreated, toxic shock and death. Meningococcal disease occurs seasonally in some regions of the world. In Sub-Sahara Africa, epidemics of meningococcal disease occur between December and June. Localized outbreaks have been reported in parts of Brazil, India and Nepal. Short-terms travellers staying in city hotels with high standards, and little contact with the local population are at minimal risk and should not need to be vaccinated for travel in Asia, Africa or Latin America. For additional information on Meningitis, click here.

 

 

Poliomyelitis*

 

Poliomyelitis, commonly called polio, is a disease caused by a virus. It can vary in severity from a mild illness with fever, to an inflammation of the lining of the brain, to paralysis and sometimes death. Most residents of Canada are already vaccinated against polio; however, if you have not been vaccinated before, or if you have not had a booster shot in the past 10 years, you may require polio vaccine before you travel. Outbreaks of polio can occur in many countries, especially those without national vaccination programs. For additional information on Polio, click here.

 

 

Rabies

 

Rabies is an acute viral infection, causing inflammation of the brain and spinal cord which is invariably fatal. Rabies occurs in many areas of the world. Travellers planning extended visits to countries where rabies control programs for domestic animals are inadequate, or who are planning to live in areas where rabies is widespread should consider pre-exposure immunization with rabies vaccine. A post-exposure vaccine exists for use following a bite by a rabid animal; however, it may not be easily available in all countries. Regardless of whether pre-exposure immunization has been given, any traveller bitten by a rabid animal should be given the post-exposure vaccine immediately. For additional information on Rabies, click here.

 

 

Rubella*

 

Rubella, also known as German measles, is usually a mild illness caused by a virus. Its symptoms include fever, headache, malaise, inflammation of the tissues around the eyes and a widespread rash. Rubella can cause serious birth defects in an unborn child should the mother be infected during pregnancy. All children and women of childbearing age who have never had rubella or have not been previously vaccinated, should be given a rubella vaccine prior to travel. For additional information on Rubella, click here.

 

 

Tetanus*

 

Tetanus, also known as lockjaw, is caused by a toxin produced by the tetanus bacteria. This bacteria, found usually in the soil, infects an open wound or cut and begins to produce toxin. The toxin causes painful muscle contractions usually in the face and neck muscles. If untreated, the contractions can restrict breathing, causing death. In Canada, a tetanus booster shot is recommended every 10 years. All travellers should have up-to-date tetanus shots prior to travel.

 

 

Typhoid

 

Typhoid fever is caused by a bacterial infection. Its symptoms include a sustained fever, headache, malaise, loss of appetite, slowed heartbeat, enlarged spleen and rose spots developing on the trunk of the body. Typhoid is typically spread through water which has not been adequately treated to remove or kill the bacteria. Typhoid vaccine is recommended for any traveller who will have prolonged exposure to potentially contaminated water and food. Most urban tourist destinations provide water which is adequately treated; however, if you plan to travel in smaller cities and villages in developing countries, or rural areas off the usual tourist routes, you may need to be vaccinated against typhoid before you travel. For additional information on Typhoid, click here.

 

 

Yellow Fever

 

Yellow fever is an viral disease spread by mosquito bite. The symptoms include the sudden onset of fever, chills, headache, generalized muscle pain, severe fatigue, nausea and vomiting.

 

International Health Regulations, established by the World Health Organization, require that travellers to regions where yellow fever is found be vaccinated against yellow fever and given an International Certificate of Vaccination. A valid certificate issued within the past 10 years is required for entry into 21 countries in Central Africa and South America. In addition, 102 other countries require proof of vaccination from travellers who have passed through (non-direct flights) an area where yellow fever occurs. Travellers without proper vaccination and certificate can be seriously delayed, depending on the route and destination. Both the vaccine and certificate are only available at certain travel medicine clinics recognized by the Public Health Agency of Canada as yellow fever clinics.. For additional information on Yellow Fever, click here.

 

Additional Information

The Public Health Agency of Canada's document entitled General Advice for Travellers, provides additional information on Travel Health related issues.

 

And I found this here: Travel Health Advice

 

General Travel Health Advice

The following provides general health-related advice for international travel . For your individual situation, you should consult a physician or travel medicine clinic for advice related to where you are travelling. A listing of travel medicine clinics in Canada is available from the Canadian Society for International Health.

 

Information about safety and security considerations during travel is provided by the Foreign Affairs Canada via web site, phone at 1-800-267-6788 or through a fax retrieval service at 1-800-575-2500.

 

Before You Travel

If you are planning to travel internationally, you should consult a physician or travel medicine clinic at least four to six weeks before travel in order to allow enough time for any immunizations that may be required to be completed. This is especially true for those planning travel to tropical areas or developing countries.

 

A health professional will be able to assess your individual need for immunization or preventative medication depending on your health situation, previous immunization history and your travel itinerary.

 

Recommended Immunizations

 

You should ensure that your routine immunizations - diphtheria, whooping cough (pertussis), tetanus, polio, measles, mumps and rubella- are up-to-date. If you normally receive influenza vaccine in Canada, it should be continued for travel.

 

Immunizations to prevent typhoid and hepatitis A are recommended for travel to areas where sanitary conditions are poor.

 

In travel to remote areas or where special risks exist, immunizations against meningitis, Japanese encephalitis, European tick-borne encephalitis, hepatitis B or rabies may be recommended.

 

Yellow fever vaccination is mandatory for entry into some countries in Central Africa and South America. Travellers to these countries must possess an international certificate of vaccination to certify that they have had yellow fever vaccination. An additional 102 countries, while not requiring proof of vaccination for travellers arriving direct from Canada, do require a yellow fever certificate is there has been a stop-over in a country where yellow fever occurs. More detailed information about yellow fever vaccination requirements.

 

Malaria

If you are travelling to a country or area where malaria occurs, you will need to obtain a sufficient supply of antimalarial medication to begin taking the drug for a full week before departure, for the entire duration of travel in the malarial area, and for four weeks after leaving the area.

 

The actual medication to be taken will vary depending on the particular strain of malaria present in the country or area to be visited and whether or not resistance to drugs has developed.

 

Preventing malaria in travellers includes personal protective measures to reduce the risk of mosquito bites, as well as the appropriate use of antimalarial medications. Travellers to areas where there is a risk of malaria should consult a physician or travel medicine clinic in order to obtain individualized advice regarding malaria prevention during travel.

 

More Information and advice on malaria prevention .

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thank you very much

 

far enough

www.Pattaya-Thai.com - Pattaya, Thailand News and Social Network.

 

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This is exactly the type of info I signed up to get...Well, some of the more important info I was looking for. Thanks

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It is an important issue that everyone should be up to date on when travelling. I've never had to worry as I received all of the mentioned innoculations when I was in the army as well as many that aren't listed here. Some do require periodic boosters as well and I know the Hep A & Hep B shots are multiple shots over a period of months, but you can safely travel between shots to my knowledge.

 

As with anything concerning your health though you should always seek the advice of a competent professional.

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It is an important issue that everyone should be up to date on when travelling. I've never had to worry as I received all of the mentioned innoculations when I was in the army as well as many that aren't listed here. Some do require periodic boosters as well and I know the Hep A & Hep B shots are multiple shots over a period of months, but you can safely travel between shots to my knowledge.

 

As with anything concerning your health though you should always seek the advice of a competent professional.

 

Very good advice, Braveheart

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  • 3 weeks later...

i just went doctors and got em done for nowt

Bassgod and M.Mike are my best mates, not in a gay way..or is it?

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I just went to my local GP, they checked on their charts what i needed as to where I was going (which was Thailand) I needed 2 injections, 1 had 2 things in and the other had 3. All fine, was free as well. Got them done about 2 weeks before going. Your local GP can give you all the information you need. No real need for malaria tablets unless you are going near the borders or possibly down to Koh Chang.

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hi again

 

well so i am confused now, cuz, lots of peoples telling u dont need any injections, and u be fine

 

i was thinking about not doing it, but i go see doc tommorow, see what he say thats the best option i think

 

 

cheers

www.Pattaya-Thai.com - Pattaya, Thailand News and Social Network.

 

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dont bother with doctor, fone, ask for the nurse and get yerself booked in, dunt cost yer a dime,

 

better safe than sorry.

 

there is a form of hepatitus than can be contracted through food.

 

better off having them done for fuck all

Bassgod and M.Mike are my best mates, not in a gay way..or is it?

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Nurse done them for for me, cute little asian girl. Would have fucked her big time!

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i had a fucking audience, students there.

 

id have give them both one

Bassgod and M.Mike are my best mates, not in a gay way..or is it?

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Better Safe than sorry. Had Twinrix set of three now good for life. Cheers T

May the best of your past, be the worst of your future.

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  • 3 weeks later...

went to doc

 

recived 2 injections

 

1. HAVRIX - Hepatitis A, Typhoid - 6 to 12 months need booster, will last for 20 years

2. Revaxis - Diphtheria, Tetanus, Polio - last for 10 years

 

But doctor was thinking about Hepatitis B, and he didnt give it to me, and its the one that spreads through blood, human liquids, and sex intercourse.

 

I might need that one as well, so remmember if u go to doc ask for does.

 

 

 

Any one nows, that u can get Hepatitis B injection in pattaya ? and where and how much they charge for it.

 

 

its got to get it as it is for years .

www.Pattaya-Thai.com - Pattaya, Thailand News and Social Network.

 

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went to doc

 

recived 2 injections

 

1. HAVRIX - Hepatitis A, Typhoid - 6 to 12 months need booster, will last for 20 years

2. Revaxis - Diphtheria, Tetanus, Polio - last for 10 years

 

But doctor was thinking about Hepatitis B, and he didnt give it to me, and its the one that spreads through blood, human liquids, and sex intercourse.

 

I might need that one as well, so remmember if u go to doc ask for does.

Any one nows, that u can get Hepatitis B injection in pattaya ? and where and how much they charge for it.

its got to get it as it is for years .

 

 

today i went to local GB NHS clinic again, (after appointment) to get Hepatitis B done

 

told them I am going for very active holliday to thailand, can ride on elephants, I will do Muay Thai, can get hurt, will be touching other peoples get swet, get tatoo, or u can simply tell them u got thai gf :)

 

recived:

 

Engerix B - Hepatitis B, I will get 2 more in 2 weeks time, so whole course of 3 will takes me 3 weeks, i got it fast, normaly it takes bit longer then that, but as I am leaveing soon, i do it fast, doc told me its fine, u can be safe after one, but there is no guarantee, however if u liveing next day its better to get 1 then none.

 

I have to paid for this one 25£, so whole set cost 75£

 

 

I you cant bother with NHS, go private travel clinic:

 

http://www.masta-travel-health.com/ (UK)

 

http://www.masta-travel-health.com/docs/tcprices.pdf

 

 

 

Hope this helps.

www.Pattaya-Thai.com - Pattaya, Thailand News and Social Network.

 

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