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Australia turns asylum boat back to Indonesia: police


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KUPANG, Indonesia - The Australian navy has turned an asylum-seeker boat back to Indonesia without first informing authorities there, Indonesian police said Tuesday, as part of Canberra's hardline border policies that have angered Jakarta.

 

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wish britain did the same

"And were you pleased?" they asked Helen in Hell.

"Pleased?" answered she,when all Troy's towers fell;

And dead were Priam´s sons, and lost his throne?

And such a war was fought as none had known;

And even the Gods took part; and all because

Of me alone! Pleased?

I should say I was!"

 

Lord Dunsany

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this should have been done a few years ago

Jolly Roger
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Poor Asylum Seekers.

Missed Inonesia completely? Or were they allowed to leave the country without proper exit documents?

Did they pass through Indo Immigration and did they have evidence of onward travel?

I think not.

Just as well the Aus. Navy gave them directions back so they could sort out the unfortunate oversight.

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Poor Asylum Seekers.

Missed Inonesia completely? Or were they allowed to leave the country without proper exit documents?

Did they pass through Indo Immigration and did they have evidence of onward travel?

I think not.

Just as well the Aus. Navy gave them directions back so they could sort out the unfortunate oversight.

 

Yeah, fleeing civil war and chaos - the bastards how dare they.

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Yeah, fleeing civil war and chaos - the bastards how dare they.

No Civil War and Chaos in Indonesia.

Just a bunch of corrupt profiteers prepared to take the money to let these people risk their lives in a leaky boat.

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No Civil War and Chaos in Indonesia.

 

Yes, but they have little hope of making a life in countries like Indonesia or Malaysia, or Thailand; even if these countries are signatories to the refugee convention, the people are treated harshly, usually can't work legally, are subject to arrest, or extrajudicial harassment and abuse.

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Yes, but they have little hope of making a life in countries like Indonesia or Malaysia, or Thailand; even if these countries are signatories to the refugee convention, the people are treated harshly, usually can't work legally, are subject to arrest, or extrajudicial harassment and abuse.

Yeah, funny that.

Australia is then the Racist one?

As outlined by a retired ex Minister for Thai Immigration on Dateline a few months back?

With apologies to current Thai Govt.

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Yeah, funny that.

Australia is then the Racist one?

As outlined by a retired ex Minister for Thai Immigration on Dateline a few months back?

With apologies to current Thai Govt.

 

I don't think so. Australians are pretty good at accepting new immigrants when they are not being whipped into a frenzy by shock jocks and right-wing pollies. Seems to me those countries have less capacity than we have to help. They have enough problems of their own without trying to resettle refugees.

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All they are is economic refos,they pay thousands for a ticket,don't see many "genuine' ref,s having that kind of money,and they certainly are not scared to take on our government in court,must be only their own that terrifies them !! :Raspberry6:

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Yes, but they have little hope of making a life in countries like Indonesia or Malaysia, or Thailand; even if these countries are signatories to the refugee convention, the people are treated harshly, usually can't work legally, are subject to arrest, or extrajudicial harassment and abuse.

I am happy if these people come to Australia,but on the condition that for every family of these "refugees"...they are housed,fed etc etc by some of these "bleeding hearts"(the people that demonstrate in the streets in support of the boats)for the first 5 years of their stay in Australia...no Medicare/dole/pensions...and of ZERO burden to the Australian taxpayer.If they break any laws (serious stuff...not parking tickets)within that 5 years,they are instantly deported to where they came from.For example,that Iraqi cunt that flashed his cock and was man-handling and groping 13 and 14 year old girls(5 or 6 of them) at Sydney Olympic pool about 3 weeks ago,should be instantly deported.

image.png.6eb5df3c4b99a4189996c2a21d8f14af.png

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I don't think so. Australians are pretty good at accepting new immigrants when they are not being whipped into a frenzy by shock jocks and right-wing pollies. Seems to me those countries have less capacity than we have to help. They have enough problems of their own without trying to resettle refugees.

Yes, we are, when done through the proper channels.

So, I guess countries like Indonesia could do better than assist Asylum Seekers to bypass the normal channels, undermining Australia's control of our own Immigration policy.

 

It seems like the classic "Nothing to do with us" argument, when there is quite obviously money changing hands to let these people into Indonesia in the first place and money changing hands to let them out. They're obviously not going to Antartica and they reside in countries like Indonesia for more than just a normal 30 day visa period, waiting for their passage on a dodgy boat.

 

Which raises another question, if I am a poor Man in these countries, am I expected to take a back seat on the Immigration queue whilst moneyed up people get to jump it, blowing the Policy quota as deemed appropriate by the Government, given our own sparse population and supporting infrastructure?

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I am happy if these people come to Australia,but on the condition that for every family of these "refugees"...they are housed,fed etc etc by some of these "bleeding hearts"(the people that demonstrate in the streets in support of the boats)for the first 5 years of their stay in Australia...no Medicare/dole/pensions...and of ZERO burden to the Australian taxpayer.If they break any laws (serious stuff...not parking tickets)within that 5 years,they are instantly deported to where they came from.For example,that Iraqi cunt that flashed his cock and was man-handling and groping 13 and 14 year old girls(5 or 6 of them) at Sydney Olympic pool about 3 weeks ago,should be instantly deported.

 

I don't think we can have a class of people here who don't have access to the basics, mate. That's really not the way we operate and to be honest, we're being self-serving, because that is a recipe for social breakdown. I do agree that there is a big issue with refugee migrants on long term benefits (i.e. not getting into work). In my experience, very few people actually prefer to not work, and I reckon we can do better getting these people into work. I also agree with you that people who have sought refuge here and then abuse it by committing serious offences ought to be get the book thrown at them, but having said that, I also note that the last statistics I heard said that rates of offending in refugee communities are a lot less than in, um, ours, us.

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I don't think we can have a class of people here who don't have access to the basics, mate. That's really not the way we operate and to be honest, we're being self-serving, because that is a recipe for social breakdown. I do agree that there is a big issue with refugee migrants on long term benefits (i.e. not getting into work). In my experience, very few people actually prefer to not work, and I reckon we can do better getting these people into work. I also agree with you that people who have sought refuge here and then abuse it by committing serious offences ought to be get the book thrown at them, but having said that, I also note that the last statistics I heard said that rates of offending in refugee communities are a lot less than in, um, ours, us.

55 yep we're stuck with our own. Perhaps we could send them to Indonesia for an appreciation exercise?

But I do agree that folks who can't respect the local laws and culture should be farked off.

That's the way it is in LOS.

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Yes, we are, when done through the proper channels.

So, I guess countries like Indonesia could do better than assist Asylum Seekers to bypass the normal channels, undermining Australia's control of our own Immigration policy.

 

It seems like the classic "Nothing to do with us" argument, when there is quite obviously money changing hands to let these people into Indonesia in the first place and money changing hands to let them out. They're obviously not going to Antartica and they reside in countries like Indonesia for more than just a normal 30 day visa period, waiting for their passage on a dodgy boat.

 

Which raises another question, if I am a poor Man in these countries, am I expected to take a back seat on the Immigration queue whilst moneyed up people get to jump it, blowing the Policy quota as deemed appropriate by the Government, given our own sparse population and supporting infrastructure?

 

We can't do anything about corruption abroad. I agree with you that it is frustrating that transit countries don't do better, but "what are you gonna do"? Immigration policy and obligation to refugees are different, but relates; we plan immigration, but we have obligations under refugee conventions, though I understand that an over-subscription on refugees leads to a tailoring of the immigration target, and I understand that we set these targets with our skills needs in mind.

 

I'm just saying that we need a balance.

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I just want to say:

 

In a lot of countries, people's lives are really threatened and there is no orderly queue; in fact even seeking to get in the queue can get you locked up, tortured or killed, your family , and so on.

 

Also, when people talk about these people paying $10K USD etc to get on a boat, so they must be economic migrants, just remember, a lot of times this is borrowed money (they aren't rich at all) and the family back home is collateral against payment.

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I don't think we can have a class of people here who don't have access to the basics, mate. That's really not the way we operate and to be honest, we're being self-serving, because that is a recipe for social breakdown. I do agree that there is a big issue with refugee migrants on long term benefits (i.e. not getting into work). In my experience, very few people actually prefer to not work, and I reckon we can do better getting these people into work. I also agree with you that people who have sought refuge here and then abuse it by committing serious offences ought to be get the book thrown at them, but having said that, I also note that the last statistics I heard said that rates of offending in refugee communities are a lot less than in, um, ours, us.

These people have no basics where they came from and if they were with a "sponsor" for that 5 year period...well the "sponsor" pays for them.If the "sponsors" felt so heart-felt and strong about these peoples plight...they would truly "sponsor" them and not just limit themselves to periodically walking down George Street with a group of like-minded "bleeding hearts".

 

I know that people prefer to work...I want to work myself but have been unemployed for over a year now,but have been knocked back for positions that have been taken by others ,so I am living off my own savings...no dole,nothing...however I do have a medicare card(woopie),but still have to pay for private health insurance as well.

image.png.6eb5df3c4b99a4189996c2a21d8f14af.png

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We can't do anything about corruption abroad. I agree with you that it is frustrating that transit countries don't do better, but "what are you gonna do"? Immigration policy and obligation to refugees are different, but relates; we plan immigration, but we have obligations under refugee conventions, though I understand that an over-subscription on refugees leads to a tailoring of the immigration target, and I understand that we set these targets with our skills needs in mind.

 

I'm just saying that we need a balance.

What are you gonna do? Send them back, so the message gets out that this is not the way to get to Australia.

This last incident with the Oz Navy did not result in any loss of life or hardship. Unless you count the financial hardship, potential loss of life to Indonesian Profiteers resulting from disgruntled customers wanting their money back.

 

Then, hopefully we can get back control of and, importantly, scrutinisation of our Refugee intake.

We certainly don't need to be importing the kind of people who are genuinely not fleeing persecution or are hopeful of a better, integrated life.

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These people have no basics where they came from and if they were with a "sponsor" for that 5 year period...well the "sponsor" pays for them.If the "sponsors" felt so heart-felt and strong about these peoples plight...they would truly "sponsor" them and not just limit themselves to periodically walking down George Street with a group of like-minded "bleeding hearts".

 

I know that people prefer to work...I want to work myself but have been unemployed for over a year now,but have been knocked back for positions that have been taken by others ,so I am living off my own savings...no dole,nothing...however I do have a medicare card(woopie),but still have to pay for private health insurance as well.

 

Appreciate what you're saying, but I think we should be compassionate as a nation. I don't know how taxing individual people would work in practice. Sorry to hear that you are not in work.

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What are you gonna do? Send them back, so the message gets out that this is not the way to get to Australia.

This last incident with the Oz Navy did not result in any loss of life or hardship. Unless you count the financial hardship, potential loss of life to Indonesian Profiteers resulting from disgruntled customers wanting their money back.

 

Then, hopefully we can get back control of and, importantly, scrutinisation of our Refugee intake.

We certainly don't need to be importing the kind of people who are genuinely not fleeing persecution or are hopeful of a better, integrated life.

 

 

Can only reply by referring to post #16.

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Appreciate what you're saying, but I think we should be compassionate as a nation. I don't know how taxing individual people would work in practice. Sorry to hear that you are not in work.

No taxing individual people at all...the"sponsors" pay for everything for these people out of their own pockets.If they need to build a granny flat at the back of their house to house these people...then they pay out of their own pocket.Exactly the same way that some guys get their TGFs out to Australia...they pay for everything.

image.png.6eb5df3c4b99a4189996c2a21d8f14af.png

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Can only reply by referring to post #16.

Yeah, true but you wouldn't borrow the money if you didn't think there was a better than average chance of realising your goal.

I figure, back to the original post that Indonesia is pissed at Australia turning back the boats, that certain elements in Indonesia are not towing the line to support our good relations. I think I can guess why.

Plus these people have had to cross at least seven countries to get to Indonesia.

Sounds like a pretty well organised network to me.

Another reason to shut down the Profiteers of Misery.

 

One other thought, you can't buy into everyone else's emotional blackmail. You realistically can only look after your own backyard.

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What are you gonna do? Send them back, so the message gets out that this is not the way to get to Australia.

This last incident with the Oz Navy did not result in any loss of life or hardship. Unless you count the financial hardship, potential loss of life to Indonesian Profiteers resulting from disgruntled customers wanting their money back.

 

Then, hopefully we can get back control of and, importantly, scrutinisation of our Refugee intake.

We certainly don't need to be importing the kind of people who are genuinely not fleeing persecution or are hopeful of a better, integrated life.

 

Where? You can't force a transit country to accept them back - you literally can't fly them there - they won't get through immigration,  and there is an international law principle called non-refoulement, which means you can't repatriate a person to the place they fled.

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No taxing individual people at all...the"sponsors" pay for everything for these people out of their own pockets.If they need to build a granny flat at the back of their house to house these people...then they pay out of their own pocket.Exactly the same way that some guys get their TGFs out to Australia...they pay for everything.

You can't link a refugee to a sponsor; people just arrive.

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Will swop some of your Indonesians for a shit load of the Romanian and Bulgarian pikey's thieves and dippers  we are getting in UK . At least we could get some decent  nasi goreng and babi pangang . fuck your political correctness . we should make it as hard as possible for them to come here . we might slag off the Thais but they have the right ideas on somethings . 

oops just read this back , mods please feel free to move to rant section

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