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There's no "NO" in thai language


learningthaihelp

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I read many time, that thai doesn't have word for "NO".

 

So what does mean these two words?

 

ไมไข (mai chai)

ไมอูะ (mai au)

 

I'm just guessing how to write it. Read it aloud, you will understand.

23 24 25 26 27 28 years old farang & living in Pattaya north Thailand. :Finger4:

And I ride Kawasaki KSR only!

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I read many time, that thai doesn't have word for "NO".

 

So what does mean these two words?

 

ไมไข (mai chai)

ไมอูะ (mai au)

 

I'm just guessing how to write it. Read it aloud, you will understand.

 

Mia chai = not yes

 

Mia au = not want

 

this is MY understanding of it, but could be vastly wrong!

 

 

Bill

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Is Mai not not?? 555

When it's followed by aow yes. 

Haha now it's getting even more confusing. 

My Youtube Channel about everything Thailand - TravInThailand


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Mia chai = not yes

 

Mia au = not want

 

this is MY understanding of it, but could be vastly wrong!

 

 

Bill

Mine too, they use "not yes" as "no" (so I was told)

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Oh, of course, au means want. I didn't realized that.

 

And...when I use au and when I use yaak (=want)?

23 24 25 26 27 28 years old farang & living in Pattaya north Thailand. :Finger4:

And I ride Kawasaki KSR only!

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Oh, of course, au means want. I didn't realized that.

 

And...when I use au and when I use yaak (=want)?

Don't say mai yaak...it's not polite. 

My Youtube Channel about everything Thailand - TravInThailand


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I often hear the single word "Mai" used as "no", although "baw" (isaan) is more common. Whether this is grammatically correct or not, I don't know, but it does appear to be a bit blunt and maybe impolite when "mai" is used  alone.

As for "ao" and "yaak", I always thought that "yaak" is the more polite version.

I believe that "yaak" is always used with a verb.

Ie. in a restaurant, the waitress may ask "ao arai", but I am sure that "yaak arai" is wrong. It would be "yaak gin arai" or "yaak sung arai" "What would you like to eat/order?"

Chasing girls can be expensive

But it's more expensive if you catch one

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If I understand it correctly, than:

 

pom yaak boom boom == I want (do) sex == I want verb

pom ao nam prao  == I want water == I want thing

23 24 25 26 27 28 years old farang & living in Pattaya north Thailand. :Finger4:

And I ride Kawasaki KSR only!

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In my opnion, Mai is basically a negative. Not necessary a "No" like we use in English.

 

Mai ao - Not want

Mai kao jai - Not understand

Mai chai - Not yes. 

 

You could just respond by saying "Mai" but that is seen as impolite. 

 

Yaak = Want to (Activity)

Ao = want (Object)

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In my opnion, Mai is basically a negative. Not necessary a "No" like we use in English.

 

Mai ao - Not want

Mai kao jai - Not understand

Mai chai - Not yes. 

 

You could just respond by saying "Mai" but that is seen as impolite. 

 

Yaak = Want to (Activity)

Ao = want (Object)

 

What do they put on forms beside boxes, as in "tick one, Yes, No"?

"Life teaches you how to live it, if you live long enough." - Tony Bennett

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What do they put on forms beside boxes, as in "tick one, Yes, No"?

 

 

chai - mai chai

23 24 25 26 27 28 years old farang & living in Pattaya north Thailand. :Finger4:

And I ride Kawasaki KSR only!

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I often hear the single word "Mai" used as "no", although "baw" (isaan) is more common. Whether this is grammatically correct or not, I don't know, but it does appear to be a bit blunt and maybe impolite when "mai" is used  alone.

As for "ao" and "yaak", I always thought that "yaak" is the more polite version.

I believe that "yaak" is always used with a verb.

Ie. in a restaurant, the waitress may ask "ao arai", but I am sure that "yaak arai" is wrong. It would be "yaak gin arai" or "yaak sung arai" "What would you like to eat/order?"

 

"Baw" is Lao (or Isaan) not Thai. Isaan is a dialect of the Lao language not Thai.

 

Same with Farang or Falang. Falang is Lao, Farang is Thai. Lao does not have a "R" as Thai does hence all the Issan girls (who grew up speaking Isaan) change a lot of the R's to L's when speaking Thai.

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"Baw" is Lao (or Isaan) not Thai. Isaan is a dialect of the Lao language not Thai.

 

Same with Farang or Falang. Falang is Lao, Farang is Thai. Lao does not have a "R" as Thai does hence all the Issan girls (who grew up speaking Isaan) change a lot of the R's to L's when speaking Thai.

 

Did you somehow manage to miss the (isaan) that I put after "baw" in my post that you quoted ??

Chasing girls can be expensive

But it's more expensive if you catch one

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Did you somehow manage to miss the (isaan) that I put after "baw" in my post that you quoted ??

 

Actually I did.

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I think you're safe to forego some of the polite versions of the Thai language when frequenting the bars in Patttaya :GoldenSmile1:

 

 

You are correct however My advice would be to ALWAYS try  to speak the best and correct Thai you can it WILL pay off in the long term.

 

 

JDM

if you are Looking to rent an apartment in a condo take a look at my website.

 

http://www.condopattaya-rent.com

 

 

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MAI ME (not have) i seem to get that when i go shop and they dont have or a reply if some one trys to up you for a few bucks.

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I read many time, that thai doesn't have word for "NO".

 

So what does mean these two words?

 

ไมไข (mai chai)

ไมอูะ (mai au)

 

I'm just guessing how to write it. Read it aloud, you will understand.

If somebody tries to sell you something you do not want, just say “Mai, khrab.” (ไม่ ครับ) if you are a man and “Mai, khaa.” (ไม่ ค่ะ) if you are a woman or a ladyboy.

If you want to be extremely polite you can pronounce “khraab” instead of “khrab”.

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