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Thai Conjunctions....Many ways to say the same thing....


Kerivara1000

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Certainly not the sexiest of topics on PA, but do any of you geniuses have a special formula for remembering Thai conjunctions?  There seem to be several ways in Thai to say the same English conjunctions, none of which stick in the brain easily, as there is not an object to latch onto, only an abstract concept. 

 

Repetition?  Self flagellation?  How do you remember these?

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My english isn't too great, so can you give some examples.

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For me it's repetition.

 

When you start out learning Thai your sentences will be so short that you don't really need them. But when your Thai improves and your sentences get longer, you use them all the time, no matter what subject you're talking about. The common ones will then stick in your brain soon enough.

 

Most of the common ones are pretty straightforward: but, if, because, or, etc. are used pretty much the same as in English.

 

The most common one though is a bit different: and

 

Most beginner books and classes translate it as และ "lae" because that word is used the same as in English.

Nothing wrong with that, just that it's a bit formal and mostly used in written language. In a normal conversation Thais rarely use it.

 

In a normal conversation they mostly use 2 words, depending on what needs to be connected:

-กับ "gap" (literally: with), to connect words, like: me and my friend, sugar and milk, I like tits and ass

-แล้วก็ "laew gor" (sth like: and then), to connect sentences, like: I like tits and I like ass too.

Or like when you're telling a story: and then...and then...and then...

 

Well, as you can see it's a bit more difficult, so you can understand why most beginner books stick with "lae" :D

 

So if you find yourself using "lae" all the time and you want to sound more Thai, then try to minimize that and use "gap" and "laew gor" instead.

ขออภัยในความไม่สะดวก กูเกิลทรานสเลทไม่สามารถแปลข้อมูลนี้ได้ 

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For me it's repetition.

 

When you start out learning Thai your sentences will be so short that you don't really need them. But when your Thai improves and your sentences get longer, you use them all the time, no matter what subject you're talking about. The common ones will then stick in your brain soon enough.

 

Most of the common ones are pretty straightforward: but, if, because, or, etc. are used pretty much the same as in English.

 

The most common one though is a bit different: and

 

Most beginner books and classes translate it as และ "lae" because that word is used the same as in English.

Nothing wrong with that, just that it's a bit formal and mostly used in written language. In a normal conversation Thais rarely use it.

 

In a normal conversation they mostly use 2 words, depending on what needs to be connected:

-กับ "gap" (literally: with), to connect words, like: me and my friend, sugar and milk, I like tits and ass

-แล้วก็ "laew gor" (sth like: and then), to connect sentences, like: I like tits and I like ass too.

Or like when you're telling a story: and then...and then...and then...

 

Well, as you can see it's a bit more difficult, so you can understand why most beginner books stick with "lae" :D

 

So if you find yourself using "lae" all the time and you want to sound more Thai, then try to minimize that and use "gap" and "laew gor" instead.

Thanks.....that was very helpful. I was always using "lae" because the books that I have teach it that way, but your advice makes more sense.

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