Jump to content
IGNORED

Learn Thai in a Week! intensive accelerated-learning workshop


Rapid Language Learning

Recommended Posts

Chiang Mai  September 30 - October 6, Monday - Saturday (8am-5pm) - or do it online at your own convenience.

I'm giving another of my famous intensive accelerated-learning Read+Speak Thai "bootcamps".

 

Come to Chiang Mai for a wonderful "learning holiday", it's cooler than Pattaya, life is cheaper here, the food is delicious, people are friendly, the girls are arguably more genuine and this little but sophisticated city is surrounded by forests, mountains, hot springs, rivers and waterfalls. (Nakhonchai Air run a very efficient 10-hour coach service between Pattaya and Chiang Mai, 800 baht.)

Many expats find it very difficult or time-consuming to learn Thai, and what they do learn is often a mangled "farang" dialect of Thai - without being able to read the signs and menus (the "living dictionary") that surround us and no way to easily progress. I know many people who've lived here 5, 10, 15 years - and even have Thai kids they can't understand - and have never got around to learning Thai beyond the very simplistic market or "taxi" Thai.

baat2.jpg

Well, now there is a way. The revolutionary Rapid Method is based on quirky visual associations, a simplified restructuring of the Thai language, and a minimalist less-is-more approach, so that instead of have to wade through mountains of material, you only need to *master* a relatively small number of sentence patterns, an easy-to-remember vocabulary (using electronic flashcards and mnemonics) and perhaps an interesting book or movie or two.

workshop_in_lanna_house.jpg

In one week, you'll learn to read Thai plus speak & understand about 100 words and phrases, but it doesn't end there. You get a year's worth of follow-up material and instruction - with a native Thai teacher via Skype. Very little study time is required, 15 minutes a day plus two 1-hour sessions per week with your teacher - to become fluent in everyday spoken (and written) Thai.

If you can't attend (or afford) the workshop then you can just as easily learn to speak and read Thai yourself by following the self-study courses online.

It's vitally important to learn to read first! Once you can read, you gradually absorb Thai from your environment with minimal effort. It doesn't take long. At the end of this one-week workshop, you will be able to recognize and accurately sound out thousands of Thai words and sentences - albeit slowly and without necessarily understanding what you are reading... and also pronounce them with the correct tones.

To try out the Rapid Method yourself, please watch the ten-minute video to learn the top 13 letters and sign up for the free Starter Course. Full details about the workshop, online and video courses on the website.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 63
  • Created
  • Last Reply

All sounds very good but in a week i would think.many would struggle at the amount you claim they could learn

 

In one week learn to reconize some words would be more seemingly than learn to

read Thai.

 

I can speak a bit and admit my accent lets me down more and how i say things than anything ekse

 

i hope it goes well for you and i will look at these methods and video when at my main computer

 

Ghosty

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've just signed up for your free starter course!

 

If it's good then I will happily pay for the further courses!

 

 

Thanks

 

 

Bill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks like a good course. I've had experience with similar methods in the past.

Women are made to be loved, not understood.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The dates of your 'boot camp' are no good for me.  Do you have any other dates planned for later in the year ?

If it flies, floats or fucks - it will be cheaper to rent !
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi all and thanks for your support and good wishes.

 

Ghosty, I've done these courses many times before (usually in just two days). Learning to read Thai is the easy part! I've discovered that it takes a bit more time to get your head around speaking correctly and developing a vocabulary and understanding of Thai. That's why I've extended the workshop so that we can spend the afternoons on "mental aerobics" and "face gym" activities. We'll build up a useful vocabulary using my "stick figure" mnemonic method and then practice saying useful phrases in the style of mastering tongue twisters, plus have some fun reading menus, short stories and singing a few karaoke songs. This is already an awful lot for one week, so the idea is to establish a firm foundation for a longer-term (one year) program of developing fluency in speaking everyday Thai in a relaxed manner, using the same techniques we practiced in the workshop.

 

Listen to the youtube video: what other people have said about the course. And here are a couple of my favorite testimonials:

 

This course was fantastic – exactly what I needed in my quest to learn to read Thai.  I must admit I was a little skeptical at first, but the course exceeded my expectations by miles. We were really reading Thai script by the end of the week and I am continuing to learn more every day with the online resources and follow on suggestions from the instructor.  I’ve tried other methods of learning the Thai alphabet but Gary’s pictures are just what I needed to help me remember.  I highly recommend this course. Cheron Gelber, businesswoman, Seattle

I've just finished the four half-day course learning the Thai script almost effortlessly and now I can read Thai. I am not often sure what the word means but I can read it in Thai. The course is based on associating each letter with a drawn character, sometimes funny, sometimes rude and always memorable. After a couple of lessons you can read some of the signs in the street and by the end of the course you are fluent in the Thai alphabet. This painless way of mastering the alphabet gives a sense of achievement and learning the language itself becomes less daunting, more interesting and great fun. Paul Sullivan, author, Chiang Mai

 

I've also had Bangkok Post (Learning) evaluate my course, the editor didn't believe it was possible to learn to read in a weekend and he challenged me to allow him to attend and bring a Thai reporter. Here's what he wrote. Virtual Travel Guides also sent a reporter, who has since become one of my most enthusiastic advocates. Read what she wrote here. I've even had a competitor review my online course, JC from retirecheap.asia - he's been trying to learn to read for 10 years and produced a youtube video where he enthusiastically

after finding that he could already start to read Thai in just a few hours of following my course. (He made quite a few mistakes in the video, but keep in mind that he'd only just completed the introductory lessons in the course.)

 

Rod, if I get enough people wanting to attend the bootcamp then I'll do it when and where it's convenient for the participants. There are a few people from USA and Australia who want to attend. They are planning a trip around September or October, so I'll probably run a workshop in Bangkok to fit in with their schedules.

 

In the meantime, you can follow the entire series of courses online. I'm currently editing a video version of the workshop, which may make the bootcamps redundant in the future - except for those really lazy bastards who keep procrastinating and just want someone to tie them to their seats in chains, whip them and verbally abuse them to force them to swallow all those nasty Thai words and phrases until they speak beautifully!

:Teacher1:

 

(I might charge a lot more for that service!!!!) :laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess I'm just stupid but I'm an American and it took me

longer than a weel to learn English?

A SMART MONKEY IS A MONKEY THAT DOESN'T MONKEY WITH ANOTHER MONKEY'S MONKEY.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Dave - not all Americans are stupid :laugh: What makes the Rapid Method so radical is that it does not try to re-invent the wheel by expecting you to learn all over again like a child.Most other approaches think that this is the "natural" way to learn. It may be, but it's tough, grueling and very time-consuming. We take 10 years of daily toil to learn our own language! And all a child can achieve in that time is mostly just basic, everyday speech.

 

I take what you already know in your own language, culture and general knowledge and harness that as an existing scaffold for building on the Thai language (or whatever other language you want to learn). Are you old enough (or know enough about world history) to know what a U-Boat is, for instance? Well, that gives you the letter "b" in Thai because it looks like a "U" (see the image in the OP). As for the tones, it's the same as we have in English - the inflection you use when asking a question is the same inflection for the numbers 2 (sawng?) and 3 (saam?) etc. For remembering new words, just make pictures of them using English words - The Japanese spend a lot of YEN to keep their sushi cold. Here's one you'll like: imagine going snorkling inside a woman's pussy. It's dark and you shout up to her "aHOY is there anyone out there?" (hoy? as a question also means seashell or mollusc - obviously.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gotta be BS. I've been teaching language for 14 years off and on and there's no way a week can do much. Seen nice ads for Enlish in 3 months and even thats rediculous.  The books from Chiang Mai Uni are the best and were a great help but thousands of words of vocabulary, grammar, phonetics, and tonals. I have to assume you teach only super geniuses. Take a week just to learn the phonetic symbols for the Thai script much less the Thai script itself. Just reality.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All sounds very good but in a week i would think.many would struggle at the amount you claim they could learn

 

In one week learn to reconize some words would be more seemingly than learn to

read Thai.

 

I think you would be quite surprised. I have completed the reading course and it does not concentrate on recognising certain works. It takes a bit of time but I am now able to sound out words from Thai script. Most of the time I have no idea what a lot of it means but I have a good idea of what they sound like.

Pattaya Photos Free newbie guide to Pattaya How to get a TG a tourist visa for Australia Pattaya Weather


My moto for 2017: Don't argue with an idiot. Don't argue with.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Take a week just to learn the phonetic symbols for the Thai script much less the Thai script itself. Just reality.

I learnt the Thai alphabet in less than 15 hours of study using this system!

Pattaya Photos Free newbie guide to Pattaya How to get a TG a tourist visa for Australia Pattaya Weather


My moto for 2017: Don't argue with an idiot. Don't argue with.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I learnt in a similar timeframe from the same concept. Around 8 hours to learn consonants, 6 hours to learn vowels. Was writing thai alphabet in thai script with names, initial and final consonants and vowels from memory after 6 weeks. Now can read reasonably well, just need to build vocab. Been learning a total of 13 weeks. Once you can read thai script sooooo much easier to pick up words and phrases.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I learnt in a similar timeframe from the same concept. Around 8 hours to learn consonants, 6 hours to learn vowels. Was writing thai alphabet in thai script with names, initial and final consonants and vowels from memory after 6 weeks. Now can read reasonably well, just need to build vocab. Been learning a total of 13 weeks. Once you can read thai script sooooo much easier to pick up words and phrases.

Right, it's not at all difficult to learn to read Thai, and once you can read you can't stop, everywhere you look you're spelling things out in your mind and making sense of it all. 

Women are made to be loved, not understood.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Learn Thai in a week? Bollocks! Surface learning at a pinch. Long term knowledge retention only for those who have exceptional neurological abilities.

 

I've educated myself / been educated continuously from aged 18 to present (38) in various disciplines & after 2 years living in Thailand I'm still not proficient in the 4 skills! I have conversational Thai, can read very slowly but still find listening difficult as colloquial Thai is vastly different from the formal Thai one learns from the books / Thai teachers.

 

I have the CELTA along with PGCE qualifications from the UK so I do know something about pedagogy.

 

Anyway, beware of 'get rich quick' schemes generally...nuff said.

sgu_banner.gif
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gotta be BS. I've been teaching language for 14 years off and on and there's no way a week can do much. Seen nice ads for Enlish in 3 months and even thats rediculous.  The books from Chiang Mai Uni are the best and were a great help but thousands of words of vocabulary, grammar, phonetics, and tonals. I have to assume you teach only super geniuses. Take a week just to learn the phonetic symbols for the Thai script much less the Thai script itself. Just reality.

 

 

Learn Thai in a week? Bollocks! Surface learning at a pinch. Long term knowledge retention only for those who have exceptional neurological abilities.

 

I've educated myself / been educated continuously from aged 18 to present (38) in various disciplines & after 2 years living in Thailand I'm still not proficient in the 4 skills! I have conversational Thai, can read very slowly but still find listening difficult as colloquial Thai is vastly different from the formal Thai one learns from the books / Thai teachers.

 

I have the CELTA along with PGCE qualifications from the UK so I do know something about pedagogy.

 

Anyway, beware of 'get rich quick' schemes generally...nuff said.

 

 

Why shit on the OP's advert?   Are you familiar with the product and services offered by him?  Have you made a thorough review of his materials and practices?   Better be careful OP as you might make some enemies amongst the 40K Baht a month language teachers union.types.  Also, how does having a 120 hour CELTA (Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults) certificate provide any support for being critical of a program that teaches Thai language skills?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Learn Thai in a week? Bollocks! Surface learning at a pinch. Long term knowledge retention only for those who have exceptional neurological abilities.

 

I've educated myself / been educated continuously from aged 18 to present (38) in various disciplines & after 2 years living in Thailand I'm still not proficient in the 4 skills! I have conversational Thai, can read very slowly but still find listening difficult as colloquial Thai is vastly different from the formal Thai one learns from the books / Thai teachers.

 

I have the CELTA along with PGCE qualifications from the UK so I do know something about pedagogy.

 

Anyway, beware of 'get rich quick' schemes generally...nuff said.

He is very clear about what you will and will not learn:  The 'Rapid' approach to learning Thai

Pattaya Photos Free newbie guide to Pattaya How to get a TG a tourist visa for Australia Pattaya Weather


My moto for 2017: Don't argue with an idiot. Don't argue with.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course you cannot get full fluency in a language in one week, but that's not what OP claims. He said "In one week, you'll learn to read Thai plus speak & understand about 100 words and phrases. This is a reasonable claim.

Women are made to be loved, not understood.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

seen the youtube videos - entertaining and novel high energy approach. i like it! 

This version of me will not stay the same, tomorrow I will be different.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As for the tones, it's the same as we have in English - the inflection you use when asking a question is the same inflection for the numbers 2 (sawng?) and 3 (saam?) etc. 

 

Are you sure?     :7of10Score:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

filibuster:

 

Everyone uses inflections slightly differently, but once you've found the right inflection for you in English that matches the Thai tone then use it.

 

For me, if I say in English "Are you well?" I get the inflection I need for "sawng?" and "saam?" and "huay?" (lottery), etc.

 

If I'm a bit incredulous: "What!? Are you sure?" then I get the inflection for words like "wad!?" (temple) or "rot!?" (vehicle). Sometimes I do a kind of a mental run up: "Is that really a...." (Harley!? wad!? rot!?)

 

I have to put in a lot of excitable, emphatic energy to get the tone for "caaw!" (rice) and "som!" (orange) and "mai!" (no/not) and "dai!" (can/able). It's like saying "Yeah!!" in English and actually helps to physically make a fist while saying the Thai word in question.

 

Yes it may feel a bit silly to us, but Thais won't notice the internal antics going in our heads and to them we will actually sound quite natural.

 

Try it out with your Thai friend (girlfriends) and get them to help you find the right tone - your job is then to find an emotion or phrase that you say that gives the same intonation.

 

For most people, the suggestions I've made above seems to work. Sometimes I have to coach a person individually - in the workshop - to find something that works for him/her. In fact, I've had people who can already read come to my workshop for the sole purpose of "getting" the tones. It doesn't take long, but you need to practice it all the time until it becomes so natural that you do it without thinking. it feels like a bit of an emotional roller coaster at first.

 

"mee" (keep your voice deadpan)

"beeya" (deadpan)

"sod" (feel sad/depressed)

"dtraa" (deadpan)

"sing?" (ask a question)

"rue?" (another question)

"bplao" (sad)

"khab!?" (feel uncertain)

 

มี เบียร์ สด ตรา สิงห์ หรือ เปล่า ครับ

You don't have any Sing(ha) draft beer, do you?

 

it sounds complicated, but it really isn't because in colloquial speech, one rarely enunciates the tone for each word. Nevertheless, it's important to know what the tone should be so that you appear to be speaking naturally.

 

Otherwise it's a bit like getting the stresses wrong in English (did you know that every word in English has different stresses on each syllable?) What if I asked you to send me a list of your "com-PAANy's a-SETS". You wouldn't understand me - but that's how the Singaporeans speak English.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

filibuster:

 

Everyone uses inflections slightly differently, but once you've found the right inflection for you in English that matches the Thai tone then use it.

 

 

For me, if I say in English "Are you well?" I get the inflection I need for "sawng?" and "saam?" and "huay?" (lottery), etc. 

 

"Are you well?" is a closed (yes/no) question.  As such, it is spoken in English with a rising tone - just like sawng and saam.  On the other hand, "Where are you going?" is an open question (lots of possible answers) and is spoken with a falling tone - nothing at all like the tone used with sawng and saam.

 

 

Otherwise it's a bit like getting the stresses wrong in English (did you know that every word in English has different stresses on each syllable?) 

 

Indeed.  And on different words in a sentence.

 

What if I asked you to send me a list of your "com-PAANy's a-SETS". You wouldn't understand me - but that's how the Singaporeans speak English.

 

I live in the south of Thailand.  I deal with Singaporeans every day of the week without any problem.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

"Are you well?" is a closed (yes/no) question.  As such, it is spoken in English with a rising tone - just like sawng and saam.  On the other hand, "Where are you going?" is an open question (lots of possible answers) and is spoken with a falling tone - nothing at all like the tone used with sawng and saam.

 

Yes, you are absolutely right! I never thought about it as open or closed questions, with different intonations, so thanks for that!

 

The problem is people do use different intonations for the same thing. I know several people who ask questions - in English - with a "falling tone", so it's tough for them to find the right intonation for use with the Thai "rising tone". In your case, "Are you well?" will give you the right intonation for the "rising tone".

 

The reason why I avoid the terms "rising", "falling" etc in the Rapid Method is that it doesn't really work. It may be technically correct if you think of it musically or measure the frequencies, but if you try to make a sound with a "rising tone", it comes out sounding very contrived and somewhat ridiculous. Thais don't understand us when we make a "rising" or "falling" tone - we sound faintly operatic in our speech when we do so, kind of like speaking with a hot potato in your mouth.

 

That's why I came up with this other approach, and maybe it's not 100% correct, but it's a lot easier for us and it does come across as sounding a lot more natural.

 

 

I live in the south of Thailand.  I deal with Singaporeans every day of the week without any problem.

 

haha - then you might not appreciate why we regular folk can't understand Singaporeans speak "English" so easily. And subsequently why Thais find it difficult to understand our mangled Thai. We're supposed to be speaking the same language, right? How do you get on with understanding Indians or Scottish people? It took me several calls with different Indian call center staff to realize that the "data bit" that they always asked me for was in fact my "date of birth"....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, you are absolutely right! I never thought about it as open or closed questions, with different intonations, so thanks for that!

 

The problem is people do use different intonations for the same thing. I know several people who ask questions - in English - with a "falling tone", so it's tough for them to find the right intonation for use with the Thai "rising tone". In your case, "Are you well?" will give you the right intonation for the "rising tone".

 

The reason why I avoid the terms "rising", "falling" etc in the Rapid Method is that it doesn't really work. It may be technically correct if you think of it musically or measure the frequencies, but if you try to make a sound with a "rising tone", it comes out sounding very contrived and somewhat ridiculous. Thais don't understand us when we make a "rising" or "falling" tone - we sound faintly operatic in our speech when we do so, kind of like speaking with a hot potato in your mouth.

 

That's why I came up with this other approach, and maybe it's not 100% correct, but it's a lot easier for us and it does come across as sounding a lot more natural.

 

It worked fine for folks before the so-called Rapid Method made an appearance.

 

 

I live in the south of Thailand.  I deal with Singaporeans every day of the week without any problem.

 

haha - then you might not appreciate why we regular folk can't understand Singaporeans speak "English" so easily. And subsequently why Thais find it difficult to understand our mangled Thai. We're supposed to be speaking the same language, right? How do you get on with understanding Indians or Scottish people? It took me several calls with different Indian call center staff to realize that the "data bit" that they always asked me for was in fact my "date of birth"....

 

Since I was born and brought up in Edinburgh, it hasn't been a particular problem for me.  How about you "regular folk", how do you get by?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.




  • COVID-19

    Any posts or topics which the moderation team deems to be rumours/speculatiom, conspiracy theory, scaremongering, deliberately misleading or has been posted to deliberately distort information will be removed - as will BMs repeatedly doing so. Existing rules also apply.

  • Advertise on Pattaya Addicts
  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.